A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » Regional Cycling » UK
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Helmets



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #101  
Old April 21st 04, 02:14 PM
Just zis Guy, you know?
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Helmets

David Martin wrote:

Kayak has a deck and can happily be rolled if the occupant has a
splashdeck and appropriate competence.


But not kept warm. Hence the old adage: you can't have your kayak and heat
it.

--
Guy
===
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University


Ads
  #102  
Old April 21st 04, 02:18 PM
Peter Clinch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Helmets

James Annan wrote:

Not entirely sure why the location makes a particular difference, it is
either where the boat is stored or it is not.


You were in the habit of launching racing 8s off of small rocky beaches
with *very* minor roads to access them?

As for subsidised transits, the once I did the the driving it was in a
hired car with a towbar.


i.e., effectively a private motor vehicle.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

  #103  
Old April 21st 04, 02:18 PM
Peter Clinch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Helmets

James Annan wrote:

Not entirely sure why the location makes a particular difference, it is
either where the boat is stored or it is not.


You were in the habit of launching racing 8s off of small rocky beaches
with *very* minor roads to access them?

As for subsidised transits, the once I did the the driving it was in a
hired car with a towbar.


i.e., effectively a private motor vehicle.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

  #104  
Old April 21st 04, 02:20 PM
Roos Eisma
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Helmets

David Martin writes:

What is the difference (If it can be explained in less than 3 lines)?

Kayak has a deck and can happily be rolled if the occupant has a splashdeck
and appropriate competence.
Canoe is open and sinks when filled with water (if it has no additional
buoyancy.


Also a kayak is typically paddled seated wheras a canoe should typically be
paddled kneeling


The latter definition is better. A canoe is typically paddled kneeling
with a single-bladed paddle, a kayak is paddled sitting with a double
bladed paddle.
The first description doesn't work for things like a C1, which looks like
a whitewater kayak in every respect (closed deck, can be rolled) but does
have a kneeling support rather than a seat and is paddled with only half a
paddle...

Roos
  #105  
Old April 21st 04, 02:20 PM
Roos Eisma
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Helmets

David Martin writes:

What is the difference (If it can be explained in less than 3 lines)?

Kayak has a deck and can happily be rolled if the occupant has a splashdeck
and appropriate competence.
Canoe is open and sinks when filled with water (if it has no additional
buoyancy.


Also a kayak is typically paddled seated wheras a canoe should typically be
paddled kneeling


The latter definition is better. A canoe is typically paddled kneeling
with a single-bladed paddle, a kayak is paddled sitting with a double
bladed paddle.
The first description doesn't work for things like a C1, which looks like
a whitewater kayak in every respect (closed deck, can be rolled) but does
have a kneeling support rather than a seat and is paddled with only half a
paddle...

Roos
  #106  
Old April 21st 04, 02:28 PM
Peter Clinch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Helmets

David Martin wrote:

Kayak has a deck and can happily be rolled if the occupant has a splashdeck
and appropriate competence.
Canoe is open and sinks when filled with water (if it has no additional
buoyancy.


Sorry, nul points :-(

sprint K boats have open cockpits and will swamp if they go over,
spraydeck in place or not, as there's no way to brace yourself in to
roll. Whitewater Cs are closed and though harder to roll than a roughly
equivalent kayak it can certainly be done.

Difference is in ancestry and the paddling style. Canoes are derived
from Native American designs and use a single bladed paddle used on one
side of the craft, kayaks are derived from Inuit and Aleut designs and
are powered with a double-ended paddle used on both sides alternately.

Designs tend to be merging in some areas, especially inflatables where
the basic ancestry is more canoe but the paddles are double ended.

Also a kayak is typically paddled seated whereas a canoe should typically be
paddled kneeling


Nearer... Most open canoes have seats which are used in calmer water,
though you kneel or half-kneel in the rough stuff. Serious white water
canoes often have a saddle, though it's used in a kneeling position.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

  #107  
Old April 21st 04, 02:28 PM
Peter Clinch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Helmets

David Martin wrote:

Kayak has a deck and can happily be rolled if the occupant has a splashdeck
and appropriate competence.
Canoe is open and sinks when filled with water (if it has no additional
buoyancy.


Sorry, nul points :-(

sprint K boats have open cockpits and will swamp if they go over,
spraydeck in place or not, as there's no way to brace yourself in to
roll. Whitewater Cs are closed and though harder to roll than a roughly
equivalent kayak it can certainly be done.

Difference is in ancestry and the paddling style. Canoes are derived
from Native American designs and use a single bladed paddle used on one
side of the craft, kayaks are derived from Inuit and Aleut designs and
are powered with a double-ended paddle used on both sides alternately.

Designs tend to be merging in some areas, especially inflatables where
the basic ancestry is more canoe but the paddles are double ended.

Also a kayak is typically paddled seated whereas a canoe should typically be
paddled kneeling


Nearer... Most open canoes have seats which are used in calmer water,
though you kneel or half-kneel in the rough stuff. Serious white water
canoes often have a saddle, though it's used in a kneeling position.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

  #108  
Old April 21st 04, 03:05 PM
Simon Brooke
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Helmets

in message , Peter Clinch
') wrote:

Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
Gawnsoft wrote:


Cars are used often for transport where there are no easily
substitutable alternative forms of transport.


The word "no" seems to have slipped into the above by accident ;-)


Yes and no ;-)
Tell me how to get to Arisaig with 2x5m sea kayaks in an evening
without using a private motor vehicle and I'll be interested and
surprised.


Helicopter? Flying boat? VSTOL? Matter tranference gateway?

A more serious question (for all of us) is why we do these things. We
all claim, more or less, to care about the environment, and people who
ride mountain bikes and paddle sea kayaks on the whole claim to care
more about the environment than others.

So why do you need to tear across Scotland and back in a weekend? Why,
of course, because you have to go to work on Monday. Why do you have to
go to work on Monday? Why, so you can earn enough to be able to afford
to tear across Scotland and back in a weekend.

Strictly on topic for this group, it's a vicious cycle.

And its a vicious cycle with an alarming appetite for non-renewable
resources. The car (almost certainly less than a decade old) which we
use to tear about the place has a huge energy cost of manufacture, and
uses large amounts of plastics, etc, which are themselves made lagely
of petrochemicals. Substantial parts of it can never effectively be
recycled. It's using large amounts of fuel. The roads it needs are
polluting and destroying the fragile ecosystems we say we're going to
enjoy.

Break the cycle, sack your boss, go and live somewhere where the
facilities you want are on your doorstep, and find a way to earn a
living there - where you don't have to run a car which can blast across
Scotland and back in a weekend, where your housing costs are likely to
be cheaper, and where, consequently, you can get by on a much smaller
salary.

--
(Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; may contain traces of nuts, bolts or washers.
  #109  
Old April 21st 04, 03:05 PM
Simon Brooke
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Helmets

in message , Peter Clinch
') wrote:

Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
Gawnsoft wrote:


Cars are used often for transport where there are no easily
substitutable alternative forms of transport.


The word "no" seems to have slipped into the above by accident ;-)


Yes and no ;-)
Tell me how to get to Arisaig with 2x5m sea kayaks in an evening
without using a private motor vehicle and I'll be interested and
surprised.


Helicopter? Flying boat? VSTOL? Matter tranference gateway?

A more serious question (for all of us) is why we do these things. We
all claim, more or less, to care about the environment, and people who
ride mountain bikes and paddle sea kayaks on the whole claim to care
more about the environment than others.

So why do you need to tear across Scotland and back in a weekend? Why,
of course, because you have to go to work on Monday. Why do you have to
go to work on Monday? Why, so you can earn enough to be able to afford
to tear across Scotland and back in a weekend.

Strictly on topic for this group, it's a vicious cycle.

And its a vicious cycle with an alarming appetite for non-renewable
resources. The car (almost certainly less than a decade old) which we
use to tear about the place has a huge energy cost of manufacture, and
uses large amounts of plastics, etc, which are themselves made lagely
of petrochemicals. Substantial parts of it can never effectively be
recycled. It's using large amounts of fuel. The roads it needs are
polluting and destroying the fragile ecosystems we say we're going to
enjoy.

Break the cycle, sack your boss, go and live somewhere where the
facilities you want are on your doorstep, and find a way to earn a
living there - where you don't have to run a car which can blast across
Scotland and back in a weekend, where your housing costs are likely to
be cheaper, and where, consequently, you can get by on a much smaller
salary.

--
(Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; may contain traces of nuts, bolts or washers.
  #110  
Old April 21st 04, 03:38 PM
Peter Clinch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Helmets

Simon Brooke wrote:

Break the cycle, sack your boss, go and live somewhere where the
facilities you want are on your doorstep, and find a way to earn a
living there - where you don't have to run a car which can blast across
Scotland and back in a weekend, where your housing costs are likely to
be cheaper, and where, consequently, you can get by on a much smaller
salary.


I don't know of anywhere with all the facilities I want on my doorstep,
because I'm not immediately content to potter about in a single location
or be away from the various benefits of an urban centre. At some level
this does mean I'm a selfish person. As does the fact I'm willing to
buy expensive bicycles while people are starving. Nobody's perfect.

As it is, I've already made the decision to live somewhere where *most*
of the facilities I'm after are reasonably close to me, and I do so
despite a fairly low renumeration, so I don't spend as much time tearing
about the place as I might. But I still like to drive or fly off to go
skiing etc., and I'm nasty enough that I'll continue to do so.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
published helmet research - not troll patrick Racing 1790 November 8th 04 03:16 AM
published helmet research - not troll Frank Krygowski General 1927 October 24th 04 06:39 AM
published helmet research - not troll Frank Krygowski Social Issues 1716 October 24th 04 06:39 AM
Cricket helmets may slow the brain, says study (D. Telegraph, 15.4.2004) Scott Leckey UK 7 April 17th 04 08:57 PM
Compulsory helmets again! Richard Burton UK 526 December 29th 03 08:19 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.