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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #251  
Old July 3rd 15, 08:48 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Rolf Mantel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 147
Default AG: Twist-ties

Am 03.07.2015 um 05:32 schrieb Frank Krygowski:

(BTW, note the spelling. "Lose" is one of the most frequently
misspelled words in English - so much so that I briefly wondered if
other English-speaking countries spelled it differently.)


Homophones are difficult to deal with for native speakers who learn
language by ear; more important common errors are
who's vs whose
it's vs its
their vs there (vs. they're in Northern England)

So lose vs. on the loose (escaped) just lines up with the others.
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  #252  
Old July 3rd 15, 12:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
john B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,603
Default AG: Twist-ties

On Fri, 03 Jul 2015 09:48:59 +0200, Rolf Mantel
wrote:

Am 03.07.2015 um 05:32 schrieb Frank Krygowski:

(BTW, note the spelling. "Lose" is one of the most frequently
misspelled words in English - so much so that I briefly wondered if
other English-speaking countries spelled it differently.)


Homophones are difficult to deal with for native speakers who learn
language by ear; more important common errors are
who's vs whose
it's vs its
their vs there (vs. they're in Northern England)

So lose vs. on the loose (escaped) just lines up with the others.


From time to time I've had folks that were learning English tell me
how difficult it is. For example, if an Indonesian can hear an
Indonesian word pronounced he can spell it. I remember my secretary
trying to come to grips with some of the English words, break and
brake, for example.
--
cheers,

John B.

  #253  
Old July 5th 15, 03:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,022
Default AG: Grease on your hands


(written 23 June 2015)

Tragically, one day I bungeed a plastic grocery bag of emergency stuff
to the outside of a pannier without tying the handles through the
wires.

I'd been refining that kit for decades, and I'd just made a spiffy new
case for the tools. http://wlweather.net/pagesew/BIKE_KIT/BIKEROLL.HTM

This morning I realized that one thing I haven't added to the
regenerating tool kit is a lip-salve box filled with Eucerin Original
Healing (the hand-lotion you can slice). So where do I get a
lip-salve box now that lip salve comes only in sticks? Perhaps the
screw-top nail-art boxes they sell at Sally's Beauty Supply would do
(but what do I do with the other five boxes in the package?)

I have some drop-dispenser bottles, and could substitute olive oil --
but I had a *very* good reason to stop carrying liquids in my tool
kit.

Oh, well, these days I fix my flats with a cell phone anyway.

I've heard of people who clean their hands with gasoline after working
on their bikes. Ew, gross, ick! *Any* grease or oil will take chain
grease off; you don't have to use a solvent that stinks to high
heaven, poses a fire hazard, and strips enough fat out of your skin to
leave you with a medical condition.

I used to use abrasive soap, but it doesn't dissolve grease as well as
grease does.

I generally use olive oil, because there's a bottle next to the
microwave, and the kitchen is only one door from the garage. Before I
started cooking with olive oil, there was usually a skillet of used
fat sitting around.

Special containers of "mechanic's hand cleaner" are available; the
smallest can of Crisco works just as well.

All work the same way: grab a glob of grease, rub it into the stain,
rub it off with a paper towel, repeat until clean -- or, out on the
road, until you don't mind touching stuff.

-------------------

At that point I stopped writing and went for a twenty-five mile ride.
Happened to pass Sally's Beauty Supply on the way back, but they have
discontinued the empty boxes. Maybe I can find something suitable in
the craftsy-waftsy department at Walmart. (Or I might find an old
lip-salve box if I cleaned out all my drawers.) I must also check
pill-box displays.

-------------------

Before getting around to posting this, I found a sample packet of hand
lotion left over from when I was a Fuller Brush Man. It still
squished, so I added it to the emergency kit.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
http://wlweather.net/N3F/ -- Writers' Exchange


  #254  
Old July 5th 15, 12:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
john B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,603
Default AG: Grease on your hands

On Sat, 04 Jul 2015 23:31:17 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


(written 23 June 2015)

Tragically, one day I bungeed a plastic grocery bag of emergency stuff
to the outside of a pannier without tying the handles through the
wires.

I'd been refining that kit for decades, and I'd just made a spiffy new
case for the tools. http://wlweather.net/pagesew/BIKE_KIT/BIKEROLL.HTM

This morning I realized that one thing I haven't added to the
regenerating tool kit is a lip-salve box filled with Eucerin Original
Healing (the hand-lotion you can slice). So where do I get a
lip-salve box now that lip salve comes only in sticks? Perhaps the
screw-top nail-art boxes they sell at Sally's Beauty Supply would do
(but what do I do with the other five boxes in the package?)

I have some drop-dispenser bottles, and could substitute olive oil --
but I had a *very* good reason to stop carrying liquids in my tool
kit.

Oh, well, these days I fix my flats with a cell phone anyway.

I've heard of people who clean their hands with gasoline after working
on their bikes. Ew, gross, ick! *Any* grease or oil will take chain
grease off; you don't have to use a solvent that stinks to high
heaven, poses a fire hazard, and strips enough fat out of your skin to
leave you with a medical condition.

I used to use abrasive soap, but it doesn't dissolve grease as well as
grease does.

I generally use olive oil, because there's a bottle next to the
microwave, and the kitchen is only one door from the garage. Before I
started cooking with olive oil, there was usually a skillet of used
fat sitting around.

Special containers of "mechanic's hand cleaner" are available; the
smallest can of Crisco works just as well.

All work the same way: grab a glob of grease, rub it into the stain,
rub it off with a paper towel, repeat until clean -- or, out on the
road, until you don't mind touching stuff.

-------------------

At that point I stopped writing and went for a twenty-five mile ride.
Happened to pass Sally's Beauty Supply on the way back, but they have
discontinued the empty boxes. Maybe I can find something suitable in
the craftsy-waftsy department at Walmart. (Or I might find an old
lip-salve box if I cleaned out all my drawers.) I must also check
pill-box displays.

-------------------

Before getting around to posting this, I found a sample packet of hand
lotion left over from when I was a Fuller Brush Man. It still
squished, so I added it to the emergency kit.



Way back when I was an apprentice one of the lads used to get cleaned
up at the end of the day by plunging both hands in a 50 gal. drum of
oil, scrubbing his hands together and than "rinsing " them in the oil
again. Than just wash the oil off with soap and water. Apparently the
oil and scrubbing got the grease and grime off, the rinse cleaned off
the dirty oil-grease-grime layer and the soap just sluiced the new
clean oil away.

While the rest of us were struggling with the "Lava" soap and the
scrubbing brushes he was off and away with clean hands :-)

( I'm not sure whether that was good for the lube oil though :-)



--
cheers,

John B.

  #255  
Old July 12th 15, 04:03 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,022
Default AG: I never tried this myself, but it ought to work


I read somewhere on the Web that if you haven't got a wringer, you can
press water out of wet clothing with a rolling pin: Simply lay the
clothes out flat and roll the pin over them.

The source said "a plastic table" -- I'd use my wooden picnic table,
because the expressed water is going to drip all over, and it would be
nice not to have to mop it up.

I once stayed in a mountain cabin that had a wooden counter that also
served as the drainboard of the sink; that would be an ideal place to
roll water out of wet cloth.

This trick might be useful when you've come in out of the rain, or
when you come home dripping with sweat and rinse your clothes in a
bucket.

Better make it two buckets -- one for the black stuff and one for the
rest.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.

  #256  
Old July 12th 15, 01:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 115
Default AG: I never tried this myself, but it ought to work

On Sun, 12 Jul 2015 00:03:46 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


I read somewhere on the Web that if you haven't got a wringer, you can
press water out of wet clothing with a rolling pin: Simply lay the
clothes out flat and roll the pin over them.

The source said "a plastic table" -- I'd use my wooden picnic table,
because the expressed water is going to drip all over, and it would be
nice not to have to mop it up.

I once stayed in a mountain cabin that had a wooden counter that also
served as the drainboard of the sink; that would be an ideal place to
roll water out of wet cloth.

This trick might be useful when you've come in out of the rain, or
when you come home dripping with sweat and rinse your clothes in a
bucket.

Better make it two buckets -- one for the black stuff and one for the
rest.


Way back when, they used to make a two roller "wringer" for those who
did the laundry by hand. Two rubber rollers in a frame with a hand
crank to turn the rollers and a clamp sort of thing to attach it to
the wash tub.

Just the thing, if they still make them :-)

My wife just reminded me that way, way, way, back when we were first
married and coin washers weren't invented she used to wash all our
stuff by hand, To get the water out, she tells me, just twist (wring)
the clothes and then give them several vigorous shakes to get the
wrinkles out.
--
cheers,

John B.
  #257  
Old July 12th 15, 01:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Andrew Chaplin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 207
Default AG: I never tried this myself, but it ought to work

John B. Slocomb wrote in
:

On Sun, 12 Jul 2015 00:03:46 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


I read somewhere on the Web that if you haven't got a wringer, you can
press water out of wet clothing with a rolling pin: Simply lay the
clothes out flat and roll the pin over them.

The source said "a plastic table" -- I'd use my wooden picnic table,
because the expressed water is going to drip all over, and it would be
nice not to have to mop it up.

I once stayed in a mountain cabin that had a wooden counter that also
served as the drainboard of the sink; that would be an ideal place to
roll water out of wet cloth.

This trick might be useful when you've come in out of the rain, or
when you come home dripping with sweat and rinse your clothes in a
bucket.

Better make it two buckets -- one for the black stuff and one for the
rest.


Way back when, they used to make a two roller "wringer" for those who
did the laundry by hand. Two rubber rollers in a frame with a hand
crank to turn the rollers and a clamp sort of thing to attach it to
the wash tub.

Just the thing, if they still make them :-)

My wife just reminded me that way, way, way, back when we were first
married and coin washers weren't invented she used to wash all our
stuff by hand, To get the water out, she tells me, just twist (wring)
the clothes and then give them several vigorous shakes to get the
wrinkles out.


The other day after cycling to my gym to work out, I rinsed my jersey to
get the sweat out. All I had to do was hand-wring it and, after 45
minutes, it was wearable--and it kept me cool in the 30 Celsius weather
until it dried.

It was a "Screaming Yellow" version of this:
http://www.mec.ca/product/5036-376/p...-jersey-mens/?
q=pearl%2Bizumi%2Bss%2Bjersey.
--
Andrew Chaplin
SIT MIHI GLADIUS SICUT SANCTO MARTINO
(If you're going to e-mail me, you'll have to get "yourfinger." out.)
  #258  
Old July 13th 15, 12:44 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,544
Default AG: I never tried this myself, but it ought to work

On 7/12/2015 8:12 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:


Way back when, they used to make a two roller "wringer" for those who
did the laundry by hand. Two rubber rollers in a frame with a hand
crank to turn the rollers and a clamp sort of thing to attach it to
the wash tub.

Just the thing, if they still make them :-)


Several choices:

https://www.lehmans.com/p-690-our-good-wringer.aspx

https://www.lehmans.com/p-2399-lehma...d-wringer.aspx

https://www.lehmans.com/p-3046-home-...r-washers.aspx

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #259  
Old July 13th 15, 12:45 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,022
Default AG: I never tried this myself, but it ought to work

On Sun, 12 Jul 2015 19:12:10 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

Way back when, they used to make a two roller "wringer" for those who
did the laundry by hand. Two rubber rollers in a frame with a hand
crank to turn the rollers and a clamp sort of thing to attach it to
the wash tub.

Just the thing, if they still make them :-)


$195.00 from Dynajet
$159,99 from Lehman
$115.00 from Etsy
$140.00 from Woodward Crossings
$149.00 "from 2 stores"
$165.33 from Shopzeon

But there isn't room in my closet-size laundry room -- not to mention
no tub to clamp it to.

Swimming pools used to have free-standing hand-cranked wringers to dry
bathing suits before you went home. I believe that the water just
dripped onto the floor, which was designed for dripping-wet people. If
I recall correctly there was a grid-like mat to accommodate people who
hadn't taken their shoes off yet.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #260  
Old July 13th 15, 07:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 115
Default AG: I never tried this myself, but it ought to work

On Sun, 12 Jul 2015 20:45:53 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Sun, 12 Jul 2015 19:12:10 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

Way back when, they used to make a two roller "wringer" for those who
did the laundry by hand. Two rubber rollers in a frame with a hand
crank to turn the rollers and a clamp sort of thing to attach it to
the wash tub.

Just the thing, if they still make them :-)


$195.00 from Dynajet
$159,99 from Lehman
$115.00 from Etsy
$140.00 from Woodward Crossings
$149.00 "from 2 stores"
$165.33 from Shopzeon

But there isn't room in my closet-size laundry room -- not to mention
no tub to clamp it to.

Swimming pools used to have free-standing hand-cranked wringers to dry
bathing suits before you went home. I believe that the water just
dripped onto the floor, which was designed for dripping-wet people. If
I recall correctly there was a grid-like mat to accommodate people who
hadn't taken their shoes off yet.


Strange, You know. Hand wringers used to be for "po folks" that
couldn't afford an electric washing machine. It looks that they have
moved up-market more than a little.

Perhaps they have been classified as "retro" and thus have become more
valiable :-)
--
cheers,

John B.
 




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