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Why are pavements not gritted?



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 5th 19, 10:03 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Peter Keller[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,092
Default Why are pavements not gritted?

On 05/02/2019 01:49, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:
wrote:
On Monday, February 4, 2019 at 11:05:08 AM UTC, GB wrote:
On 04/02/2019 10:14,
wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 7:36:19 PM UTC, Rob Morley wrote:

On a brighter note, the other day I saw an Audi go right to the
other side of the road to pass a cyclist. :-)

I do that every time I pass a cyclist.


I leave a couple of metres. Is that not what the Highway Code
recommends? It's about 50 years since I last studied it in any
detail.


Two metres is fine.

QUOTE:

According to the new law to protect cyclists, the driver needs to
leave a minimum distance from a cyclist when overtaking or travelling
alongside the bike or they could receive a fine. This would be £100
and three points on the licence for being too close to a bike on the
road.

So, how close is too close? According to experts, the recommended
distance between car and cyclist is 1.5 metres. If you are caught
within this distance, then you face the potential of a fine and
points on your licence, to the same value as speeding. This has
replaced the previous recommendation in the Highway Code which merely
said that drivers should leave 'plenty of room' when overtaking
someone on a bike.

ENDS.

https://www.petrolprices.com/news/dr...st-leads-fine/


Should not a problem as most cyclists are on the footpath anyway.


Waiting for your blood-dripping sharpened battleaxe.
Ads
  #12  
Old February 5th 19, 08:31 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
MrCheerful
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,365
Default Winter tyres

On 04/02/2019 09:48, Kerr-Mudd,John wrote:
On Mon, 04 Feb 2019 09:07:38 GMT, TMS320 wrote:

On 03/02/2019 16:02, Simon Jester wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 10:57:58 AM UTC, TMS320 wrote:

[]

What I was trying to say about winter tyres is that the tyre industry

is
currently busy trying to flog them. They do appear to offer better
traction in snow and are probably an insurance for people in essential
services (once the jack-knifed lorries have been cleared and everybody
else has decided to stay at home). But there are likely to be a lot of
"enthusiasts", that only have 2 days a year to go out to play to

justify
the outlay. If you are in the way it will annoy them.

There were (car) tyre tracks across a roundabout near me on Sat a.m.
It's just a winter playground to some of the nutters around here.



I now use winter tyres all year round (for the last three or four
years), the grip in the cold and wet is astonishing, it enables much
shorter stopping distances, which makes them worth every penny.
  #13  
Old February 5th 19, 09:48 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
TMS320
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,429
Default Winter tyres

On 05/02/2019 19:31, MrCheerful wrote:
On 04/02/2019 09:48, Kerr-Mudd,John wrote:
On Mon, 04 Feb 2019 09:07:38 GMT, TMS320 wrote:

On 03/02/2019 16:02, Simon Jester wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 10:57:58 AM UTC, TMS320 wrote:

[]

What I was trying to say about winter tyres is that the tyre
industry

is
currently busy trying to flog them. They do appear to offer
better traction in snow and are probably an insurance for people
in essential services (once the jack-knifed lorries have been
cleared and everybody else has decided to stay at home). But
there are likely to be a lot of "enthusiasts", that only have 2
days a year to go out to play to

justify
the outlay. If you are in the way it will annoy them.

There were (car) tyre tracks across a roundabout near me on Sat
a.m. It's just a winter playground to some of the nutters around
here.

I now use winter tyres all year round (for the last three or four
years), the grip in the cold and wet is astonishing, it enables much
shorter stopping distances, which makes them worth every penny.


The propaganda shows a small gain in stopping distances, not "much"
shorter distances.

Anyway, how come you are driving in a fashion where you notice? Perhaps
it supports my point.
  #14  
Old February 5th 19, 10:25 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Simon Jester
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,965
Default Winter tyres

On Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 7:31:08 PM UTC, MrCheerful wrote:
On 04/02/2019 09:48, Kerr-Mudd,John wrote:
On Mon, 04 Feb 2019 09:07:38 GMT, TMS320 wrote:

On 03/02/2019 16:02, Simon Jester wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 10:57:58 AM UTC, TMS320 wrote:

[]

What I was trying to say about winter tyres is that the tyre industry

is
currently busy trying to flog them. They do appear to offer better
traction in snow and are probably an insurance for people in essential
services (once the jack-knifed lorries have been cleared and everybody
else has decided to stay at home). But there are likely to be a lot of
"enthusiasts", that only have 2 days a year to go out to play to

justify
the outlay. If you are in the way it will annoy them.

There were (car) tyre tracks across a roundabout near me on Sat a.m.
It's just a winter playground to some of the nutters around here.



I now use winter tyres all year round (for the last three or four
years),


Since you passed your driving test, you mean.

the grip in the cold and wet is astonishing, it enables much
shorter stopping distances, which makes them worth every penny.


When you gain experience you will learn hazard perception and not need this.



  #15  
Old February 6th 19, 01:51 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
GB[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default Why are pavements not gritted?

On 05/02/2019 09:03, Peter Keller wrote:
On 05/02/2019 01:49, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:
wrote:
On Monday, February 4, 2019 at 11:05:08 AM UTC, GB wrote:
On 04/02/2019 10:14,
wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 7:36:19 PM UTC, Rob Morley wrote:

On a brighter note, the other day I saw an Audi go right to the
other side of the road to pass a cyclist. :-)

I do that every time I pass a cyclist.


I leave a couple of metres. Is that not what the Highway Code
recommends? It's about 50 years since I last studied it in any
detail.

Two metres is fine.

QUOTE:

According to the new law to protect cyclists, the driver needs to
leave a minimum distance from a cyclist when overtaking or travelling
alongside the bike or they could receive a fine. This would be £100
and three points on the licence for being too close to a bike on the
road.

So, how close is too close? According to experts, the recommended
distance between car and cyclist is 1.5 metres. If you are caught
within this distance, then you face the potential of a fine and
points on your licence, to the same value as speeding. This has
replaced the previous recommendation in the Highway Code which merely
said that drivers should leave 'plenty of room' when overtaking
someone on a bike.

ENDS.

https://www.petrolprices.com/news/dr...st-leads-fine/


Should not a problem as most cyclists are on the footpath anyway.


Waiting for your blood-dripping sharpened battleaxe.

Who uses a blunt battleaxe?
  #16  
Old February 6th 19, 06:19 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Simon Jester
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,965
Default Why are pavements not gritted?

On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 12:51:06 PM UTC, GB wrote:
On 05/02/2019 09:03, Peter Keller wrote:
On 05/02/2019 01:49, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:
wrote:
On Monday, February 4, 2019 at 11:05:08 AM UTC, GB wrote:
On 04/02/2019 10:14,
wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 7:36:19 PM UTC, Rob Morley wrote:

On a brighter note, the other day I saw an Audi go right to the
other side of the road to pass a cyclist. :-)

I do that every time I pass a cyclist.


I leave a couple of metres. Is that not what the Highway Code
recommends? It's about 50 years since I last studied it in any
detail.

Two metres is fine.

QUOTE:

According to the new law to protect cyclists, the driver needs to
leave a minimum distance from a cyclist when overtaking or travelling
alongside the bike or they could receive a fine. This would be £100
and three points on the licence for being too close to a bike on the
road.

So, how close is too close? According to experts, the recommended
distance between car and cyclist is 1.5 metres. If you are caught
within this distance, then you face the potential of a fine and
points on your licence, to the same value as speeding. This has
replaced the previous recommendation in the Highway Code which merely
said that drivers should leave 'plenty of room' when overtaking
someone on a bike.

ENDS.

https://www.petrolprices.com/news/dr...st-leads-fine/

Should not a problem as most cyclists are on the footpath anyway.


Waiting for your blood-dripping sharpened battleaxe.

Who uses a blunt battleaxe?


Executioner's axes were usually blunt instruments that crushed the victims neck and tore the head from the body by brute force.
  #17  
Old February 6th 19, 07:45 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Mr Pounder Esquire
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,223
Default Why are pavements not gritted?

Simon Jester wrote:
On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 12:51:06 PM UTC, GB wrote:
On 05/02/2019 09:03, Peter Keller wrote:
On 05/02/2019 01:49, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:
wrote:
On Monday, February 4, 2019 at 11:05:08 AM UTC, GB wrote:
On 04/02/2019 10:14,
wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 7:36:19 PM UTC, Rob Morley wrote:

On a brighter note, the other day I saw an Audi go right to the
other side of the road to pass a cyclist. :-)

I do that every time I pass a cyclist.


I leave a couple of metres. Is that not what the Highway Code
recommends? It's about 50 years since I last studied it in any
detail.

Two metres is fine.

QUOTE:

According to the new law to protect cyclists, the driver needs to
leave a minimum distance from a cyclist when overtaking or
travelling alongside the bike or they could receive a fine. This
would be 100 and three points on the licence for being too close
to a bike on the road.

So, how close is too close? According to experts, the recommended
distance between car and cyclist is 1.5 metres. If you are caught
within this distance, then you face the potential of a fine and
points on your licence, to the same value as speeding. This has
replaced the previous recommendation in the Highway Code which
merely said that drivers should leave 'plenty of room' when
overtaking someone on a bike.

ENDS.

https://www.petrolprices.com/news/dr...st-leads-fine/

Should not a problem as most cyclists are on the footpath anyway.


Waiting for your blood-dripping sharpened battleaxe.

Who uses a blunt battleaxe?


Executioner's axes were usually blunt instruments that crushed the
victims neck and tore the head from the body by brute force.


Pillock.


  #18  
Old February 6th 19, 09:15 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Simon Jester
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,965
Default Why are pavements not gritted?

On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 6:45:41 PM UTC, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:
Simon Jester wrote:
On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 12:51:06 PM UTC, GB wrote:
On 05/02/2019 09:03, Peter Keller wrote:
On 05/02/2019 01:49, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:
wrote:
On Monday, February 4, 2019 at 11:05:08 AM UTC, GB wrote:
On 04/02/2019 10:14,
wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 7:36:19 PM UTC, Rob Morley wrote:

On a brighter note, the other day I saw an Audi go right to the
other side of the road to pass a cyclist. :-)

I do that every time I pass a cyclist.


I leave a couple of metres. Is that not what the Highway Code
recommends? It's about 50 years since I last studied it in any
detail.

Two metres is fine.

QUOTE:

According to the new law to protect cyclists, the driver needs to
leave a minimum distance from a cyclist when overtaking or
travelling alongside the bike or they could receive a fine. This
would be £100 and three points on the licence for being too close
to a bike on the road.

So, how close is too close? According to experts, the recommended
distance between car and cyclist is 1.5 metres. If you are caught
within this distance, then you face the potential of a fine and
points on your licence, to the same value as speeding. This has
replaced the previous recommendation in the Highway Code which
merely said that drivers should leave 'plenty of room' when
overtaking someone on a bike.

ENDS.

https://www.petrolprices.com/news/dr...st-leads-fine/

Should not a problem as most cyclists are on the footpath anyway.


Waiting for your blood-dripping sharpened battleaxe.

Who uses a blunt battleaxe?


Executioner's axes were usually blunt instruments that crushed the
victims neck and tore the head from the body by brute force.


Pillock.


?

  #19  
Old February 6th 19, 09:30 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Kerr-Mudd,John[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 115
Default Why are pavements not gritted?

On Wed, 06 Feb 2019 20:15:47 GMT, Simon Jester
wrote:

On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 6:45:41 PM UTC, Mr Pounder Esquire
wrote:
Simon Jester wrote:
On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 12:51:06 PM UTC, GB wrote:


[a lot of snipping]

Executioner's axes were usually blunt instruments that crushed the
victims neck and tore the head from the body by brute force.


Pillock.


?


Maybe it's one of his supposed "rational thoughts"?


--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
  #20  
Old February 6th 19, 09:42 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Simon Jester
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,965
Default Why are pavements not gritted?

On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 8:30:18 PM UTC, Kerr-Mudd,John wrote:
On Wed, 06 Feb 2019 20:15:47 GMT, Simon Jester
wrote:

On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 6:45:41 PM UTC, Mr Pounder Esquire
wrote:
Simon Jester wrote:
On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 12:51:06 PM UTC, GB wrote:


[a lot of snipping]


His Royal shortness JNugent of Bedlam does not allow snipping on His newsgroup.
Unless it suits Him, of course.

 




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