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SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!



 
 
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  #191  
Old October 11th 18, 01:27 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 3,727
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 5:55:19 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-10 14:29, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/10/2018 3:14 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-10 09:19, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/10/2018 10:54 AM, Joerg wrote:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgybEXkhvHQ

"At Exposure, we feel it's as important to use good lights throughout
the day, as well as at night."

... um, because we're trying to sell the things, of course!

I don't use flash mode on my front lights though.

Then you disagree with the source you cited?


No. Those bright lights are visible enough in non-flash mode.


Speaking of visible enough: My wife and I just returned from a little
ride. We rode out to the suburban branch of our credit union to cash a
check, then a bit beyond it into sort of semi-rural roads. We returned
by different roads. We were on some quiet residential streets, some
former farm roads that are now short cuts to housing developments, a bit
on an arterial road or two with 50 mph traffic, etc. Quite a few miles
were on lanes that were obviously too narrow to share (like 9 feet wide)
so we rode at lane center.

As usual, we had no problems with any drivers. (Well, except a couple
who were clogging things up while they seemed to be looking for
entrances to some obscure businesses). And there was absolutely no
indication that anyone had any trouble seeing us.

Apparently, we were visible enough. Our bikes both had dynamo powered
lights, but neither of us had them on.



Some people are not so lucky in the lane.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGD5P_LHEHs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abqysSwOcIQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqbbiRxoWR4

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


So you manages to find ONE incident each in Britain, Australia and Tennessee U.S.A. Oh the GREAT DANGER!

Geeze Joerg, if bicycling is so darn dangerous why do you do it? Or is that why you consume so much beer = to get courage enough to ride those deadly roads and trails?

Cheers
Ads
  #192  
Old October 11th 18, 01:28 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,727
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 6:14:44 PM UTC-4, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 1:57:03 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 1:26:01 PM UTC-4, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 9:35:17 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/10/2018 1:35 AM, news18 wrote:
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 22:02:14 -0400, Frank Krygowski wrote:



I've tried rain pants only once, IIRC. IMO there can't possibly be
enough ventilation. But I admit, I know no really comfortable way of
riding in the rain.

Use 1: a cape, 2: mudguards and 3: sandals. (Wool soxes/socks if it is
cold). Caveat, I made the cape myself.

Plenty of ventilation.

That's what I usually use, except for the sandals part, although I have
friends who love their riding sandals. The mud flap on my fender takes
care of most road spray at my feet. Shoe covers over my toe clips offer
further help when necessary.

But I'm still not really comfortable riding in the rain, unless it's the
lightest sprinkle.

I've never used a rain cape and hate things that flap. For long rides in the rain, I wear basically this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIzz9VBdKCU Showers Pass jacket, PI Amfib tights, Gore booties (or one of my four or five pairs of booties). I wear a poly pro base layer and a mid-layer. This time of year, wool is a good mid-layer. I have some lightweight long-finger Giro gloves my son got on pro deal that are good for early fall, and I switch to more robust gloves as the temperatures drop.

That video has snippets of Larch Mountain (cut back and forth with hills practically in my back yard -- odd), which is a 14.5 mile climb and probably the hardest ride for picking clothing since it can be 50F at the bottom and snow at the top. You have to have something that vents really well for the climb, stays relatively dry and zips up tight for the descent. I also take a light vest and an ear band or balaclava to put on at the top.

I've told this story before, but the RT from my house to the top of Larch Mountain is 90 miles depending on route, and I did it with some friends entirely in the rain -- all day from beginning to end. Everyone got hypothermic on the descent. We had to stop repeatedly to warm up. Half the group called their wives for a ride home from Corbett. I had pretty good layering and revitalized with a life-saving corn dog at the Corbett store (and stood over a heating vent) http://columbiariverimages.com/Image...t_06-30-14.jpg , and although I suffered in the freezing rain coming down the mountain, the ride home was reasonably comfortable.

Everything soaks through eventually, and you have to pick layers that will keep you reasonably warm when wet. IMO, booties are the most important. I can't stand cold swamp feet. Everybody has fenders and rain bikes. You get shunned on a group ride if you don't have flaps on your fenders. https://www.flickr.com/photos/krheap...7632139896627/

-- Jay Beattie.


I still remember the bicycling adage folr when riding in the rain especially a heavy rain. "You're wet and cold or you're wet and warm but either way you're wet". That adage was true whether one was wearing waterproof breathable clothing, waterproof only clothing or regular clothing. When honking up a steep climb or otherwise exerting myself I found that the waterproof breathable jackets didn't vent sweat or other body moisture fast enough to prevent my clothing getting wet. At least the jacket was windproof which stopped me from getting hypothermia.

BTW, true hypothermia requires medical treatment and can NOT be overcome simple by standing someplace warm. In fact true hypothermia plus an external heating source can be fatal. One of the greatest treatments for hypothermia these days is to give the victim WARM air or oxygen via a face mask so that the body warms from the inside towards the outside.


Well, lucky for me, I was riding with my panniers filled with, among other things, a heart bypass machine and an O2 bottle. I used the bypass machine to recirculate and warm my blood and huffed a little on the 02. There were a whole bunch of other cyclists suffering like me, so I warmed their blood too, and then I pulled them back to Portland with my rope. I always keep rope with me so I can tow people. We all stopped at a brewpub on the way home. The people at the pub said, "hey, don't you know that it's raining out there!" We had a big laugh together.

-- Jay Beattie.


+10!

ROTFLMAO

Cheers
  #193  
Old October 11th 18, 01:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 121
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Wed, 10 Oct 2018 16:05:06 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-10-10 15:44, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 10 Oct 2018 07:54:40 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-10-09 17:01, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 07:57:06 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-10-08 17:22, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 16:16:43 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-10-08 16:05, John B. Slocomb wrote:

[...]

... but
having said that I might comment that it is not difficult to change
socks, even sitting on the roadside curb.


And change all the other things sitting on a curb in a business park? I
rather flick a little switch and have instant visibility. Upon arrival I
flick it again, visibility turns off. Simple.

As I said, I noticed the orange socks going up and down a kilometer
away on a bright summer day. I doubt strongly whether your super-duper
light would even be visible (in bright daylight) at that distance.


It sure is. I can say that for sure because this occasionally happens on
Green Valley Road when I have to use the car and another cyclist has
such good lighting. No orange socks. The riders with good lights are
often longhaul bike commuters. They wear nice shirts, khakis and have
panniers for their laptops and stuff.

Strange you know. I used to be a sailor and even the navigation lights
on a ship that must be visible from a 3 mile distance are hardly
noticeable in broad daylight.


Compared to a MagicShine or similar light many red and green position
lights on ships are rather dim. Also, I do not need to be seen from 3mi
away but from 1/2mi away I sometimes want to be seen.


I see. A light that can be seen from a 3 mile distance is rather dim
while a light that can be seen from 1/2 a mile is O.K.???



https://www.go2marine.com/product/16...onet-base.html

Navigation light: 30W incandescent, efficiency about 20 lumens/watt (if
you are lucky), omnidirectional 360 degrees, only vertically focused.

Mine: 8W LED, efficiency about 100 lumens/watt, not omnidirectional but
60 degree horizontal spread, similar vertical focus.

I trust you can do the math.

You certainly do not know your subject. You carefully selected a nav
light for a tiny little boat while I was talking about lights for
"ships". See
http://www.nauticexpo.com/prod/perko...71-215905.html
and then look up the light bulb (0374001CLR) which is a 30 watt bulb.

As for your claimed efficiency of the LED, so what? Can it be see from
three miles away? Certainly the U.S. Government, nor any other country
that I know of certifies shipping lights by watts, whether LED or
other . They all seem to say effectively the same thing - you gotta be
able to see it from a long way away.





--
Cheers

John B.
  #194  
Old October 11th 18, 02:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 121
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Wed, 10 Oct 2018 17:27:29 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 5:55:19 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-10 14:29, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/10/2018 3:14 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-10 09:19, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/10/2018 10:54 AM, Joerg wrote:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgybEXkhvHQ

"At Exposure, we feel it's as important to use good lights throughout
the day, as well as at night."

... um, because we're trying to sell the things, of course!

I don't use flash mode on my front lights though.

Then you disagree with the source you cited?


No. Those bright lights are visible enough in non-flash mode.

Speaking of visible enough: My wife and I just returned from a little
ride. We rode out to the suburban branch of our credit union to cash a
check, then a bit beyond it into sort of semi-rural roads. We returned
by different roads. We were on some quiet residential streets, some
former farm roads that are now short cuts to housing developments, a bit
on an arterial road or two with 50 mph traffic, etc. Quite a few miles
were on lanes that were obviously too narrow to share (like 9 feet wide)
so we rode at lane center.

As usual, we had no problems with any drivers. (Well, except a couple
who were clogging things up while they seemed to be looking for
entrances to some obscure businesses). And there was absolutely no
indication that anyone had any trouble seeing us.

Apparently, we were visible enough. Our bikes both had dynamo powered
lights, but neither of us had them on.



Some people are not so lucky in the lane.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGD5P_LHEHs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abqysSwOcIQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqbbiRxoWR4

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


So you manages to find ONE incident each in Britain, Australia and Tennessee U.S.A. Oh the GREAT DANGER!

Geeze Joerg, if bicycling is so darn dangerous why do you do it? Or is that why you consume so much beer = to get courage enough to ride those deadly roads and trails?

Cheers


Given that the reports I read say that as many as 30% of the
bicyclists that die in crashes had been drinking it might appear that
Jeorg is an accident waiting to happen. Bright lights or no lights.
--
Cheers

John B.
  #195  
Old October 11th 18, 02:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,271
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On 10/10/2018 6:14 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 1:57:03 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 1:26:01 PM UTC-4, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 9:35:17 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/10/2018 1:35 AM, news18 wrote:
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 22:02:14 -0400, Frank Krygowski wrote:



I've tried rain pants only once, IIRC. IMO there can't possibly be
enough ventilation. But I admit, I know no really comfortable way of
riding in the rain.

Use 1: a cape, 2: mudguards and 3: sandals. (Wool soxes/socks if it is
cold). Caveat, I made the cape myself.

Plenty of ventilation.

That's what I usually use, except for the sandals part, although I have
friends who love their riding sandals. The mud flap on my fender takes
care of most road spray at my feet. Shoe covers over my toe clips offer
further help when necessary.

But I'm still not really comfortable riding in the rain, unless it's the
lightest sprinkle.

I've never used a rain cape and hate things that flap. For long rides in the rain, I wear basically this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIzz9VBdKCU Showers Pass jacket, PI Amfib tights, Gore booties (or one of my four or five pairs of booties). I wear a poly pro base layer and a mid-layer. This time of year, wool is a good mid-layer. I have some lightweight long-finger Giro gloves my son got on pro deal that are good for early fall, and I switch to more robust gloves as the temperatures drop.

That video has snippets of Larch Mountain (cut back and forth with hills practically in my back yard -- odd), which is a 14.5 mile climb and probably the hardest ride for picking clothing since it can be 50F at the bottom and snow at the top. You have to have something that vents really well for the climb, stays relatively dry and zips up tight for the descent. I also take a light vest and an ear band or balaclava to put on at the top.

I've told this story before, but the RT from my house to the top of Larch Mountain is 90 miles depending on route, and I did it with some friends entirely in the rain -- all day from beginning to end. Everyone got hypothermic on the descent. We had to stop repeatedly to warm up. Half the group called their wives for a ride home from Corbett. I had pretty good layering and revitalized with a life-saving corn dog at the Corbett store (and stood over a heating vent) http://columbiariverimages.com/Image...t_06-30-14.jpg , and although I suffered in the freezing rain coming down the mountain, the ride home was reasonably comfortable.

Everything soaks through eventually, and you have to pick layers that will keep you reasonably warm when wet. IMO, booties are the most important. I can't stand cold swamp feet. Everybody has fenders and rain bikes. You get shunned on a group ride if you don't have flaps on your fenders. https://www.flickr.com/photos/krheap...7632139896627/

-- Jay Beattie.


I still remember the bicycling adage folr when riding in the rain especially a heavy rain. "You're wet and cold or you're wet and warm but either way you're wet". That adage was true whether one was wearing waterproof breathable clothing, waterproof only clothing or regular clothing. When honking up a steep climb or otherwise exerting myself I found that the waterproof breathable jackets didn't vent sweat or other body moisture fast enough to prevent my clothing getting wet. At least the jacket was windproof which stopped me from getting hypothermia.

BTW, true hypothermia requires medical treatment and can NOT be overcome simple by standing someplace warm. In fact true hypothermia plus an external heating source can be fatal. One of the greatest treatments for hypothermia these days is to give the victim WARM air or oxygen via a face mask so that the body warms from the inside towards the outside.


Well, lucky for me, I was riding with my panniers filled with, among other things, a heart bypass machine and an O2 bottle. I used the bypass machine to recirculate and warm my blood and huffed a little on the 02. There were a whole bunch of other cyclists suffering like me, so I warmed their blood too, and then I pulled them back to Portland with my rope. I always keep rope with me so I can tow people. We all stopped at a brewpub on the way home. The people at the pub said, "hey, don't you know that it's raining out there!" We had a big laugh together.


:-)



--
- Frank Krygowski
  #196  
Old October 11th 18, 02:14 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,271
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On 10/10/2018 7:48 PM, sms wrote:
On 10/10/2018 2:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-10 14:29, Frank Krygowski wrote:


Apparently, we were visible enough. Our bikes both had dynamo powered
lights, but neither of us had them on.


Some people are not so lucky in the lane.


How do you explain to someone that just because they engaged in
dangerous behavior and got lucky that it does not prove that what they
did was intelligent or logical?

In their minds, the fact that they were lucky is absolute proof that
what they did was a good idea.


sigh The techniques of riding lane centered for conspicuity have been
taught in cycling courses and written about in books and pamphlets since
at least the 1970s.

And for normal conditions, those sources have NOT required that the
cyclists use daytime running lights. This mania about the necessity of
lights in daytime has popped up only in the past few years. And it's not
coincidental that it popped up when high lumen LEDs allowed lots of new
bike lights to be marketed.

To put it more briefly: Road position works. Glaring daytime bike lights
are largely a marketing scam.

My father smoked two packs a day for about 40 years and did not get lung
cancer so that must prove that smoking was not a problem despite all the
evidence to the contrary.


Like it or not, based on the information given, smoking was NOT a
problem for your father.

For well over 40 years, riding without daytime lights has never been a
problem for me. Today, as on almost every other ride, I can see
motorists behind me approaching and if necessary waiting until it's safe
to pass. They clearly see me. So do the motorists in front of me.

But more significantly, riding without daytime lights hasn't been a
problem for millions of cyclists who rode before your flashy toys were
invented. People have been riding bikes since the 1880s. There's never
been any mass carnage.

Take your fear mongering marketing scams elsewhere. Sell your ugly
lights to pedestrians. They're at more risk than bicyclists, as the
numbers show.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #197  
Old October 11th 18, 12:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Wed, 10 Oct 2018 07:45:35 -0700, Joerg wrote:

On 2018-10-09 22:35, news18 wrote:
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 22:02:14 -0400, Frank Krygowski wrote:



I've tried rain pants only once, IIRC. IMO there can't possibly be
enough ventilation. But I admit, I know no really comfortable way of
riding in the rain.



Ride fast enough and dodge the rain drops :-)


Use 1: a cape, 2: mudguards and 3: sandals. (Wool soxes/socks if it is
cold). Caveat, I made the cape myself.

Plenty of ventilation.

I've tried the gamit from plastic, coated to fancy breathable gear, but
the above was the best set up. YMMV.


I second that.

Sans the mud guard but the splatter onto my back is muffled by racks and
panniers on both bikes.


You can always find something to weave into the top of the rack to stop/
reduce that.

Hail is a real pain though. Every time I got into that I had forgotten a
plastic bag to strap over the helmet.


Shower caps are good for that. Either pick one up from Walmart or similar
or the free ones from motel/hotel. Just pack it in a side pocket on the
handlbar bag or pocket in a pannier. Or place inside the loo roll, which
is in a plastic bag anyway.

So the hail pebbles piled up in
its vent holes, almost giving me a brain freeze.


Never had that happen. Long cold descents has to be the closest as we
have very few very cold places in Australia. Thankfully. I do have a
thin knitted beanie that fits under the cold weatrher helmet(MSR*) to
stop brain freeze on really cold times.

*MSR (rock) climbing helmets were the first 'bicycle" helmet to meet the
then new Australian bicycle helmet regulations. Second was a local
canoeing helmet, and the next changes allowed the Bell white mushroom to
meet the regs. Fourth was an Australian copy in yellow of the Bell.

The MSR was odd in that the padding was two layers of "rubber" which
eventually solidified and had all the comfort of a concrete helmet and
lead to its retirement.

  #198  
Old October 11th 18, 01:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On Wed, 10 Oct 2018 17:29:55 -0400, Frank Krygowski wrote:

On 10/10/2018 3:14 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-10 09:19, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/10/2018 10:54 AM, Joerg wrote:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgybEXkhvHQ

"At Exposure, we feel it's as important to use good lights throughout
the day, as well as at night."

... um, because we're trying to sell the things, of course!

I don't use flash mode on my front lights though.

Then you disagree with the source you cited?


No. Those bright lights are visible enough in non-flash mode.


Speaking of visible enough: My wife and I just returned from a little
ride. We rode out to the suburban branch of our credit union to cash a
check, then a bit beyond it into sort of semi-rural roads. We returned
by different roads. We were on some quiet residential streets, some
former farm roads that are now short cuts to housing developments, a bit
on an arterial road or two with 50 mph traffic, etc. Quite a few miles
were on lanes that were obviously too narrow to share (like 9 feet wide)
so we rode at lane center.

As usual, we had no problems with any drivers. (Well, except a couple
who were clogging things up while they seemed to be looking for
entrances to some obscure businesses). And there was absolutely no
indication that anyone had any trouble seeing us.

Apparently, we were visible enough. Our bikes both had dynamo powered
lights, but neither of us had them on.


It is all relative to the surroundng conditions. In the past on one of my
commutes, i had a heady 12v battery and a 50W whte halogen to the front
and a 25 red halogen to the rear simple for the short section of main
road through a commercial area full of neon signs, etc.

Other dark places, a few 3" reflectors do the job very well and lighting
is only to improve your vision and keep plod happy.



  #199  
Old October 11th 18, 03:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,507
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On 2018-10-11 04:57, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 10 Oct 2018 07:45:35 -0700, Joerg wrote:

On 2018-10-09 22:35, news18 wrote:
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 22:02:14 -0400, Frank Krygowski wrote:



I've tried rain pants only once, IIRC. IMO there can't possibly be
enough ventilation. But I admit, I know no really comfortable way of
riding in the rain.



Ride fast enough and dodge the rain drops :-)


Use 1: a cape, 2: mudguards and 3: sandals. (Wool soxes/socks if it is
cold). Caveat, I made the cape myself.

Plenty of ventilation.

I've tried the gamit from plastic, coated to fancy breathable gear, but
the above was the best set up. YMMV.


I second that.

Sans the mud guard but the splatter onto my back is muffled by racks and
panniers on both bikes.


You can always find something to weave into the top of the rack to stop/
reduce that.



I have panniers mounted permanently and they have a cross-canvas that
catches mud on the road bike. On the MTB there are several panels plus a
loading platform, so no splatters either. The problem is the front tire.
Some day I might make a custom guard for that. The stuff you can buy for
MTB is too floppy.


Hail is a real pain though. Every time I got into that I had forgotten a
plastic bag to strap over the helmet.


Shower caps are good for that. Either pick one up from Walmart or similar
or the free ones from motel/hotel. Just pack it in a side pocket on the
handlbar bag or pocket in a pannier. Or place inside the loo roll, which
is in a plastic bag anyway.


I'd sweat profusely plus plastic gives me skin rashes. I usually carry a
plastic bag and a rubber band. But you know how it is, looking into the
sky, nah, nothing's gonna happen today. And then it does.


So the hail pebbles piled up in
its vent holes, almost giving me a brain freeze.


Never had that happen. Long cold descents has to be the closest as we
have very few very cold places in Australia. Thankfully. I do have a
thin knitted beanie that fits under the cold weatrher helmet(MSR*) to
stop brain freeze on really cold times.

*MSR (rock) climbing helmets were the first 'bicycle" helmet to meet the
then new Australian bicycle helmet regulations. Second was a local
canoeing helmet, and the next changes allowed the Bell white mushroom to
meet the regs. Fourth was an Australian copy in yellow of the Bell.


I use a standard Bell cycling helmet.


The MSR was odd in that the padding was two layers of "rubber" which
eventually solidified and had all the comfort of a concrete helmet and
lead to its retirement.


Ouch.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #200  
Old October 11th 18, 03:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,507
Default SIX thousand and FIVE hundred lumens !!!!!!!!!!

On 2018-10-10 15:17, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/10/2018 5:55 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-10 14:29, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/10/2018 3:14 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-10 09:19, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/10/2018 10:54 AM, Joerg wrote:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgybEXkhvHQ

"At Exposure, we feel it's as important to use good lights throughout
the day, as well as at night."

... um, because we're trying to sell the things, of course!

I don't use flash mode on my front lights though.

Then you disagree with the source you cited?


No. Those bright lights are visible enough in non-flash mode.

Speaking of visible enough: My wife and I just returned from a little
ride. We rode out to the suburban branch of our credit union to cash a
check, then a bit beyond it into sort of semi-rural roads. We returned
by different roads. We were on some quiet residential streets, some
former farm roads that are now short cuts to housing developments, a bit
on an arterial road or two with 50 mph traffic, etc. Quite a few miles
were on lanes that were obviously too narrow to share (like 9 feet wide)
so we rode at lane center.

As usual, we had no problems with any drivers. (Well, except a couple
who were clogging things up while they seemed to be looking for
entrances to some obscure businesses). And there was absolutely no
indication that anyone had any trouble seeing us.

Apparently, we were visible enough. Our bikes both had dynamo powered
lights, but neither of us had them on.



Some people are not so lucky in the lane.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGD5P_LHEHs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abqysSwOcIQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqbbiRxoWR4


You can find videos of almost anything on the web.


It's called facts. Two university mates of mine were rear-ended in the
lane. One lost a kidney, the other had a ruptured spleen. At least in
one case the driver stuck around, something that doesn't appear popular
anymore these days.

Permission to stick head back into sand granted.

[...]

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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