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  #11  
Old May 4th 19, 01:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,270
Default Biking shorts

On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7:24:21 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy


The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.


I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


YES! For most people riding bent over rather than upright IS MORE comfortable. That's because being bent over a bit allows the spine to absorb road shock a lot better than does an upright position.

Some people who insist on riding upright do a lot better with a saddle with springs on it or with a suspension seatpost.

Also, some shorts have way to much "padding" in them which can also cause problems.

Cheers
Ads
  #12  
Old May 4th 19, 01:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ralph Barone[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 853
Default Biking shorts

AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it
would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy


The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position
is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the
suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.


I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


When riding, your weight is carried on three points - your hands, your
feet, and your ass. Leaning forwards shifts your upper body weight off your
ass to your hands and pedaling harder shifts your lower body weight from
your ass to your feet. So if you want your ass not to hurt, ride a time
trial on a triathlon bike.

  #13  
Old May 4th 19, 06:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,261
Default Biking shorts

On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:24:21 PM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy


The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.


I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


You're the best judge of that.
  #14  
Old May 4th 19, 08:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,016
Default Biking shorts

On 2019-05-03 17:15, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7:24:21 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5,
wrote:


[...]


The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your
position is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your
bottom. But the suspension of the later models greatly takes the
stress off.


I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy



Andy, since when do you ride? When I took a break of more than a decade
my behind and my wrists hurt after less than 20mi. After a year or so
that became better and now I can ride all day long. Sometimes it takes
the human body a while to get used to new modes of operation.


YES! For most people riding bent over rather than upright IS MORE
comfortable. That's because being bent over a bit allows the spine to
absorb road shock a lot better than does an upright position.


Yup. Most people think that a bent spine hurts the back but it really
doesn't. It actually helps as long as it's not an extreme racer position
at a ripe old age. Way to fix that if too upright is to try a longer
stem. Change it by several centimeters.


Some people who insist on riding upright do a lot better with a
saddle with springs on it or with a suspension seatpost.


Still makes for a bumpy ride and pain in the you know what.


Also, some shorts have way to much "padding" in them which can also
cause problems.


I ride with regular jeans shorts all year round. Loose fitting so not
much friction. I can ride all day long in those. My favorite for riding
is the cargo style because the hammer pocket is very useful to carry
glasses which can be pulled out in a second. Even on rough MTB rides
they don't fly out.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #15  
Old May 5th 19, 03:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 226
Default Biking shorts

On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7:21:26 PM UTC-5, Ralph Barone wrote:
AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it
would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy

The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position
is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the
suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.


I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


When riding, your weight is carried on three points - your hands, your
feet, and your ass. Leaning forwards shifts your upper body weight off your
ass to your hands and pedaling harder shifts your lower body weight from
your ass to your feet. So if you want your ass not to hurt, ride a time
trial on a triathlon bike.


Ok, I will try raising my seat a little and leaning forward.

Andy
  #16  
Old May 5th 19, 04:38 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,421
Default Biking shorts

On Sat, 4 May 2019 19:29:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7:21:26 PM UTC-5, Ralph Barone wrote:
AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it
would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy

The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position
is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the
suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.

I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


When riding, your weight is carried on three points - your hands, your
feet, and your ass. Leaning forwards shifts your upper body weight off your
ass to your hands and pedaling harder shifts your lower body weight from
your ass to your feet. So if you want your ass not to hurt, ride a time
trial on a triathlon bike.


Ok, I will try raising my seat a little and leaning forward.

Andy


I think Andrew Muzi offered the suggestion to have someone that is
familiar with bicycle fit have a look (at you).

In general, for example, the height of your saddle should be so that
sitting on the bike with your leg extended and the pedal at the bottom
of it's stroke, your heel should rest comfortable on the pedal with
your leg extended ( straight). Note that this is altered somewhat by
Mountain Bike guys but for road riding it should be the norm.

The fore and aft position of the seat is such that with your foot on
the pedal, with the crank arms horizontal , it should be a vertical
line from the front of your kneecap to the ball of your foot which
should be over the pedal axle.

See
https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitnes...ad-bike-370764
Which goes into even more details such as stem length, handle bar
width and so on. All with a road bike in mind but the basics apply to
all bikes.
--
cheers,

John B.

  #17  
Old May 5th 19, 05:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,131
Default Biking shorts

On Sat, 04 May 2019 12:05:35 -0700, Joerg wrote:

I ride with regular jeans shorts all year round. Loose fitting so not
much friction. I can ride all day long in those. My favorite for riding
is the cargo style because the hammer pocket is very useful to carry
glasses which can be pulled out in a second. Even on rough MTB rides
they don't fly out.


Except for the three times I wore "bike pants', I've always work standard
bike pants.

Can not stand anything in leg pockets, except when I wore home maid B&B
for rock climbing.

One of the 'bike pants' was netti Mtn bikes pants which were dngerous as
swinging you leg over often resulted in a bicycle seat up your leg. They
were/are just volumous in the leg.
  #18  
Old May 5th 19, 03:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,016
Default Biking shorts

On 2019-05-04 21:54, news18 wrote:
On Sat, 04 May 2019 12:05:35 -0700, Joerg wrote:

I ride with regular jeans shorts all year round. Loose fitting so not
much friction. I can ride all day long in those. My favorite for riding
is the cargo style because the hammer pocket is very useful to carry
glasses which can be pulled out in a second. Even on rough MTB rides
they don't fly out.


Except for the three times I wore "bike pants', I've always work standard
bike pants.


What are "standard bike pants"? I tried Lycra bike pants a couple of
times and the artificial fibers in there give me a rash. Jeans shorts
are so practical. Same for the upper body where I wear simple cotton
T-shirts.


Can not stand anything in leg pockets, except when I wore home maid B&B
for rock climbing.


I have no problems carrying a Swiss army knife, a small magnifier and in
the hammer pocket glasses. That way it's all accessible immediately. A
cycling buddy even carries his smart phone in there but then it can
break in a crash. On some MTB rides I also carry pepper spray in a
pocket in case an angry animal wants to attack me. Never had to use it
so far.


One of the 'bike pants' was netti Mtn bikes pants which were dngerous as
swinging you leg over often resulted in a bicycle seat up your leg. They
were/are just volumous in the leg.


Hmm, I never had that problem even though jeans shorts have
loose-fitting legs. The only concern is when a wasp gets in there during
a high-speed descent. Doesn't happen a lot though. But when it does ...

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #19  
Old May 5th 19, 04:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,016
Default Biking shorts

On 2019-05-04 20:38, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 4 May 2019 19:29:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7:21:26 PM UTC-5, Ralph Barone wrote:
AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it
would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy

The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position
is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the
suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.

I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


When riding, your weight is carried on three points - your hands, your
feet, and your ass. Leaning forwards shifts your upper body weight off your
ass to your hands and pedaling harder shifts your lower body weight from
your ass to your feet. So if you want your ass not to hurt, ride a time
trial on a triathlon bike.


Ok, I will try raising my seat a little and leaning forward.

Andy


I think Andrew Muzi offered the suggestion to have someone that is
familiar with bicycle fit have a look (at you).

In general, for example, the height of your saddle should be so that
sitting on the bike with your leg extended and the pedal at the bottom
of it's stroke, your heel should rest comfortable on the pedal with
your leg extended ( straight). Note that this is altered somewhat by
Mountain Bike guys but for road riding it should be the norm.

The fore and aft position of the seat is such that with your foot on
the pedal, with the crank arms horizontal , it should be a vertical
line from the front of your kneecap to the ball of your foot which
should be over the pedal axle.

See
https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitnes...ad-bike-370764
Which goes into even more details such as stem length, handle bar
width and so on. All with a road bike in mind but the basics apply to
all bikes.



Good advice.

Andy, if in doubt post a picture of the bike from the side. Maybe even
one with the bike only and one with you on it. It's ok to mask your face
if you want to remain incognito :-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #20  
Old May 5th 19, 10:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 226
Default Biking shorts

On Sunday, May 5, 2019 at 10:07:23 AM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-05-04 20:38, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 4 May 2019 19:29:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7:21:26 PM UTC-5, Ralph Barone wrote:
AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it
would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy

The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position
is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the
suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.

I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


When riding, your weight is carried on three points - your hands, your
feet, and your ass. Leaning forwards shifts your upper body weight off your
ass to your hands and pedaling harder shifts your lower body weight from
your ass to your feet. So if you want your ass not to hurt, ride a time
trial on a triathlon bike.

Ok, I will try raising my seat a little and leaning forward.

Andy


I think Andrew Muzi offered the suggestion to have someone that is
familiar with bicycle fit have a look (at you).

In general, for example, the height of your saddle should be so that
sitting on the bike with your leg extended and the pedal at the bottom
of it's stroke, your heel should rest comfortable on the pedal with
your leg extended ( straight). Note that this is altered somewhat by
Mountain Bike guys but for road riding it should be the norm.

The fore and aft position of the seat is such that with your foot on
the pedal, with the crank arms horizontal , it should be a vertical
line from the front of your kneecap to the ball of your foot which
should be over the pedal axle.

See
https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitnes...ad-bike-370764
Which goes into even more details such as stem length, handle bar
width and so on. All with a road bike in mind but the basics apply to
all bikes.



Good advice.

Andy, if in doubt post a picture of the bike from the side. Maybe even
one with the bike only and one with you on it. It's ok to mask your face
if you want to remain incognito :-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Alright.

Andy
 




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