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  #21  
Old May 5th 19, 10:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 226
Default Biking shorts

On Saturday, May 4, 2019 at 10:38:09 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 4 May 2019 19:29:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7:21:26 PM UTC-5, Ralph Barone wrote:
AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it
would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy

The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position
is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the
suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.

I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


When riding, your weight is carried on three points - your hands, your
feet, and your ass. Leaning forwards shifts your upper body weight off your
ass to your hands and pedaling harder shifts your lower body weight from
your ass to your feet. So if you want your ass not to hurt, ride a time
trial on a triathlon bike.


Ok, I will try raising my seat a little and leaning forward.

Andy


I think Andrew Muzi offered the suggestion to have someone that is
familiar with bicycle fit have a look (at you).

In general, for example, the height of your saddle should be so that
sitting on the bike with your leg extended and the pedal at the bottom
of it's stroke, your heel should rest comfortable on the pedal with
your leg extended ( straight). Note that this is altered somewhat by
Mountain Bike guys but for road riding it should be the norm.

The fore and aft position of the seat is such that with your foot on
the pedal, with the crank arms horizontal , it should be a vertical
line from the front of your kneecap to the ball of your foot which
should be over the pedal axle.

See
https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitnes...ad-bike-370764
Which goes into even more details such as stem length, handle bar
width and so on. All with a road bike in mind but the basics apply to
all bikes.
--
cheers,

John B.


I will look at the site.

I frequently ride on the side walk because of dangerous drivers.

And the side walk is frequently sunken in places resulting in bumps that I can feel in my rear.

I also have had chronic back and neck pain for over 40 years which does not help. The neck pain is the most frequent.

I am going to a neck surgeon after I get an MRI.

My PCP said 3 things can occur with surgery.

1. No help at all
2. Some help
3. Problem gets worse

He said once nerves are cut, there is no going back.

He recommended neck injections first as they sometimes provide 3 - 6 months relief.

Andy
Ads
  #22  
Old May 6th 19, 12:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,421
Default Biking shorts

On Sun, 5 May 2019 14:27:11 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Saturday, May 4, 2019 at 10:38:09 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 4 May 2019 19:29:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7:21:26 PM UTC-5, Ralph Barone wrote:
AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it
would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy

The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position
is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the
suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.

I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


When riding, your weight is carried on three points - your hands, your
feet, and your ass. Leaning forwards shifts your upper body weight off your
ass to your hands and pedaling harder shifts your lower body weight from
your ass to your feet. So if you want your ass not to hurt, ride a time
trial on a triathlon bike.

Ok, I will try raising my seat a little and leaning forward.

Andy


I think Andrew Muzi offered the suggestion to have someone that is
familiar with bicycle fit have a look (at you).

In general, for example, the height of your saddle should be so that
sitting on the bike with your leg extended and the pedal at the bottom
of it's stroke, your heel should rest comfortable on the pedal with
your leg extended ( straight). Note that this is altered somewhat by
Mountain Bike guys but for road riding it should be the norm.

The fore and aft position of the seat is such that with your foot on
the pedal, with the crank arms horizontal , it should be a vertical
line from the front of your kneecap to the ball of your foot which
should be over the pedal axle.

See
https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitnes...ad-bike-370764
Which goes into even more details such as stem length, handle bar
width and so on. All with a road bike in mind but the basics apply to
all bikes.
--
cheers,

John B.


I will look at the site.

I frequently ride on the side walk because of dangerous drivers.

And the side walk is frequently sunken in places resulting in bumps that I can feel in my rear.

I also have had chronic back and neck pain for over 40 years which does not help. The neck pain is the most frequent.

I am going to a neck surgeon after I get an MRI.

My PCP said 3 things can occur with surgery.

1. No help at all
2. Some help
3. Problem gets worse

He said once nerves are cut, there is no going back.

He recommended neck injections first as they sometimes provide 3 - 6 months relief.

Andy


I am not a doctor but it has been my experience that many pains are
due to either weak supporting muscles or overly stressed tendons and
that often exercises to strengthen weak muscles and/or stretching to
loosen overly tight tendons will often lessen or alleviate pain.

As for a doctor's recommendation, I once read a dialog between a
doctor and an exercise fanatic. The fanatic argued that as exercise
and diet can in many cases control cholesterol levels why did the
doctor recommend pills which in some cases have severe side effects?

The doctor replied that if he prescribed one hour of exercise daily
and a diet low in saturated fats that *maybe* some of his patients
*might* follow his recommendations. But, if he prescribed a little
pill every morning after breakfast that most, perhaps all, would
follow his directions.

Most doctors are realists :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #23  
Old May 6th 19, 12:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,447
Default Biking shorts

On 5/5/2019 6:12 PM, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 5 May 2019 14:27:11 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Saturday, May 4, 2019 at 10:38:09 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 4 May 2019 19:29:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7:21:26 PM UTC-5, Ralph Barone wrote:
AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it
would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy

The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position
is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the
suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.

I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


When riding, your weight is carried on three points - your hands, your
feet, and your ass. Leaning forwards shifts your upper body weight off your
ass to your hands and pedaling harder shifts your lower body weight from
your ass to your feet. So if you want your ass not to hurt, ride a time
trial on a triathlon bike.

Ok, I will try raising my seat a little and leaning forward.

Andy

I think Andrew Muzi offered the suggestion to have someone that is
familiar with bicycle fit have a look (at you).

In general, for example, the height of your saddle should be so that
sitting on the bike with your leg extended and the pedal at the bottom
of it's stroke, your heel should rest comfortable on the pedal with
your leg extended ( straight). Note that this is altered somewhat by
Mountain Bike guys but for road riding it should be the norm.

The fore and aft position of the seat is such that with your foot on
the pedal, with the crank arms horizontal , it should be a vertical
line from the front of your kneecap to the ball of your foot which
should be over the pedal axle.

See
https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitnes...ad-bike-370764
Which goes into even more details such as stem length, handle bar
width and so on. All with a road bike in mind but the basics apply to
all bikes.
--
cheers,

John B.


I will look at the site.

I frequently ride on the side walk because of dangerous drivers.

And the side walk is frequently sunken in places resulting in bumps that I can feel in my rear.

I also have had chronic back and neck pain for over 40 years which does not help. The neck pain is the most frequent.

I am going to a neck surgeon after I get an MRI.

My PCP said 3 things can occur with surgery.

1. No help at all
2. Some help
3. Problem gets worse

He said once nerves are cut, there is no going back.

He recommended neck injections first as they sometimes provide 3 - 6 months relief.

Andy


I am not a doctor but it has been my experience that many pains are
due to either weak supporting muscles or overly stressed tendons and
that often exercises to strengthen weak muscles and/or stretching to
loosen overly tight tendons will often lessen or alleviate pain.

As for a doctor's recommendation, I once read a dialog between a
doctor and an exercise fanatic. The fanatic argued that as exercise
and diet can in many cases control cholesterol levels why did the
doctor recommend pills which in some cases have severe side effects?

The doctor replied that if he prescribed one hour of exercise daily
and a diet low in saturated fats that *maybe* some of his patients
*might* follow his recommendations. But, if he prescribed a little
pill every morning after breakfast that most, perhaps all, would
follow his directions.

Most doctors are realists :-)



There's that.
A lifetime of exercise won't generate the ongoing fees of a
pill with regular office visits and lab work.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #24  
Old May 6th 19, 12:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,421
Default Biking shorts

On Sun, 05 May 2019 18:20:19 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 5/5/2019 6:12 PM, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 5 May 2019 14:27:11 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Saturday, May 4, 2019 at 10:38:09 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 4 May 2019 19:29:18 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7:21:26 PM UTC-5, Ralph Barone wrote:
AK wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 6:06:15 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, May 3, 2019 at 4:03:28 AM UTC-7, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 10:42:32 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 11:31:36 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
On Thursday, May 2, 2019 at 7:39:41 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 5/2/2019 6:16 PM, AK wrote:
I bought some Baleaf biking shorts with the expectation that it
would reduce glut pain. It did not help. ?

Andy


Have someone who knows something about riding position
critique your stem and saddle positions. Nothing wrong with
good cycling shorts, which are a good thing, but they can't
cover poor setup.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

I will check my bike shop.

I use a wide gel seat.

Maybe I need a more narrow one?

See if http://bicyclinglife.com/PracticalCycling/Sore.htm helps.

- Frank Krygowski

Thanks Frank.

I have found that periodically "walking" my bike helps too.

I forgot to mention that I have a mountain bike.

Andy

The old fashion unsuspended MTB's were pretty awful since your position
is pretty upright and most of the weight goes on your bottom. But the
suspension of the later models greatly takes the stress off.

I try to ride upright because I thought that is better on my back.

Maybe I am mistaken. ?

Andy


When riding, your weight is carried on three points - your hands, your
feet, and your ass. Leaning forwards shifts your upper body weight off your
ass to your hands and pedaling harder shifts your lower body weight from
your ass to your feet. So if you want your ass not to hurt, ride a time
trial on a triathlon bike.

Ok, I will try raising my seat a little and leaning forward.

Andy

I think Andrew Muzi offered the suggestion to have someone that is
familiar with bicycle fit have a look (at you).

In general, for example, the height of your saddle should be so that
sitting on the bike with your leg extended and the pedal at the bottom
of it's stroke, your heel should rest comfortable on the pedal with
your leg extended ( straight). Note that this is altered somewhat by
Mountain Bike guys but for road riding it should be the norm.

The fore and aft position of the seat is such that with your foot on
the pedal, with the crank arms horizontal , it should be a vertical
line from the front of your kneecap to the ball of your foot which
should be over the pedal axle.

See
https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitnes...ad-bike-370764
Which goes into even more details such as stem length, handle bar
width and so on. All with a road bike in mind but the basics apply to
all bikes.
--
cheers,

John B.

I will look at the site.

I frequently ride on the side walk because of dangerous drivers.

And the side walk is frequently sunken in places resulting in bumps that I can feel in my rear.

I also have had chronic back and neck pain for over 40 years which does not help. The neck pain is the most frequent.

I am going to a neck surgeon after I get an MRI.

My PCP said 3 things can occur with surgery.

1. No help at all
2. Some help
3. Problem gets worse

He said once nerves are cut, there is no going back.

He recommended neck injections first as they sometimes provide 3 - 6 months relief.

Andy


I am not a doctor but it has been my experience that many pains are
due to either weak supporting muscles or overly stressed tendons and
that often exercises to strengthen weak muscles and/or stretching to
loosen overly tight tendons will often lessen or alleviate pain.

As for a doctor's recommendation, I once read a dialog between a
doctor and an exercise fanatic. The fanatic argued that as exercise
and diet can in many cases control cholesterol levels why did the
doctor recommend pills which in some cases have severe side effects?

The doctor replied that if he prescribed one hour of exercise daily
and a diet low in saturated fats that *maybe* some of his patients
*might* follow his recommendations. But, if he prescribed a little
pill every morning after breakfast that most, perhaps all, would
follow his directions.

Most doctors are realists :-)



There's that.
A lifetime of exercise won't generate the ongoing fees of a
pill with regular office visits and lab work.


I suppose, like smoking, a doctor gets accustomed to that regular
income :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #25  
Old May 6th 19, 03:07 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,638
Default Biking shorts

On Sun, 5 May 2019 14:27:11 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

I frequently ride on the side walk because of dangerous drivers.


Since that requires you to get off at every intersection, you should
look into a drop-frame bike if you haven't already done so for the
back problem.

My "comfort" bike (an extreme drop frame with the cranks somewhat
forward of the normal position) has an extremely short range, but I
can ride it when I can't walk. It doesn't climb worth a nickle, but
it makes a good rolling cane on the uphills.

Now if I could figure out a way to carry my walker on it . . .

(Actually I have: buy a second walker to keep at my destination. With
luck, it will be years before I need to do that.)

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


 




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