A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

my fixie doesn't need improvement



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #81  
Old February 24th 18, 09:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,442
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On 2/24/2018 2:57 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/24/2018 2:57 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-23 10:01, Tim McNamara wrote:


In my reference, generators mounted on the seatstay or
chainstays would
be "rear triangle" mounted. Because the frame is the
ground (earth on
the east side of the Atlantic), a single wire ran through
the frame
tubes. It connected to a carbon brush in the head tube,
which me
contact with an insulated ring on the steerer tube. A
wire from that
traveled through the front rack to the headlight.


And ground went via the bearings like it does in most
European dynamos set-ups? That was always a sick concept.
I don't think in automotive anyone would let a blooper
like that pass a design review. Yet that was and maybe
still is standard fare on most dynamo-equiped bicycles.


I agree that grounding via the bike frame is a bad idea. But
it's always been possible to run a two-conductor cord and
ground things properly, which is what I've done at least
since 1980.

And AFAIK all hub dynamos have always used proper grounding
through a two-conductor cord.


Right and a fascinating history, too.
When the British invented vehicle electric systems they had
to pick a number and six is a good number so they went with
6v. Positive Earth too, which is a good name for a garage
band or a cult. Anyway over time (usually a few months) they
discovered that linen wrapped single wire passing through
punched panel holes will let the essential smoke out, at
which point the car stops. So Sturmey Archer went with
double wire. Keeps the smoke in better. All was well after that.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Ads
  #82  
Old February 24th 18, 10:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,096
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 11:57:38 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-23 10:01, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Mon, 19 Feb 2018 08:29:16 -0800, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-02-18 14:21, Tim McNamara wrote:
Since stopping racing, though, I've converted everything back to DT
shifters. I use a handlebar bag on two of my bikes and the extra cables
interfere with that. Since I'm not racing, the minor inconvenience of
reaching down to shift is a moot point for me. Plus- maybe this is a
function of my generation- I prefer the looks of DT shifters due to the
reduced cables sticking out the front. Once we have wireless shifters
that are reliable, ...

Then one sunny day it don't shift no more and the display bluntly
scrolls "An irrecoverable error has occurred. Please can 1-800 ..."
:-)


LOL! Funny because it's true. "Hang on, dudes, I have to reboot my
bike."


Almost. IIRC a guy had to bring his bike back to the shop because new
software had to be loaded to cure some suboptimal shifting behavior. In
the good old days pliers, wrenches and 15 minutes in the garage
sufficed, as it does on all my current bikes.


I'd rather upgrade software than have to toss out a POS friction-shifting derailleur like an old Campy Rally or a lot of the Simplex. Many derailleurs were suboptimal out of the box back in the supposed golden era of cycling. And it's not like DT friction shifters were immune from problems. SIS levers failed a lot.

I just got back from a ride on my UDi2 equipped Synapse -- which is my fast rain bike. Worked like a charm. However, if I hadn't gotten the bike with a crash-replacement discount and insurance money, I wouldn't have bought Di2. The price differential is not worth it to me. Cable STI works beautifully, although with the bizarre internal cable routing these days, it can be a little stiff shifting on some bikes.

-- Jay Beattie.



  #83  
Old February 24th 18, 11:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,099
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On Thu, 22 Feb 2018 00:03:47 -0800 (PST), wrote:

Some people are better of with platform pedals for their kind of riding.
I think you one of them.


Not if I'm actually riding. I can't pedal with any effort without toe
clips, and cleats make a noticeable improvement over that.

The platform pedals are on a wheelchair/walker. I can't climb a hill
on that bike, but the step-through notch is deep enough that I can
hold the bars straight in front of me when pushing it, so it makes a
good rolling cane.

The whole point of the Trek Pure is that it's easy to get on and off,
so platform pedals make a lot of sense. (I rode it barefoot once.)
The fellow who first called my attention to "comfort bikes"
demonstrated that one could mount it by walking up from the back, but
his legs are longer than mine, not to mention that I added a rack, and
if I'm using the bike, there will be a basket hanging from it.
(Besides, I'm usually wearing an ankle-length skirt when I ride it. I
stand over the step-through, pull my skirt up in the back, then sit
down, trapping the skirt pulled up to my knees. Since the bike is
semi-recumbent, it is necessary to wear trousers under the skirt.)

I chose a detachable basket, thinking that I could take it into a
store, fill it up, and hang it on the bike. But bag boys haven't a
clue as to how to pack a bike basket.

The only place that lets you pack your own bags is two miles from
here, and the route crosses 30 at an intersection that gets mentioned
on the front page of the newspaper. I'd venture to cross Winona on
the Trek, since one can get off and walk, but crossing 30 on Parker is
a suspenseful sprint when I'm riding my real bike, and pedestrians
need not apply.

Not to mention that if I go to Aldi, I want more stuff than will fit
into that little basket.

I should dust off the Trek and use it to let my rotator cuff practice
driving. But that would mean riding in circles, since every way out
of here is up.

Riding the semi-recumbent makes me see that people who think bikes
don't belong on streets aren't crazy, they have just never ridden a
real bike. I can't, for example, go through a light-controlled
intersection without getting off and using the crosswalk, because I
can't stand on the pedals for a prompt start. And two miles is a very
long trip.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


  #84  
Old February 25th 18, 05:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,019
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 5:51:24 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:

I'd rather upgrade software than have to toss out a POS friction-shifting derailleur like an old Campy Rally or a lot of the Simplex. Many derailleurs were suboptimal out of the box back in the supposed golden era of cycling.


I agree. For me, the big change came when I installed my first SunTour derailleur.
And their ratcheting "Power" shifters, I think they were called.

I remember being on one of the few suffer-fest training rides I ever did. I was
on my only bike - my touring/commuting/day-ride bike. (I did take the fenders
and handlebar bag off.) Almost everyone else was riding sew-ups and Campy.the

And I watched the guys in front of me fishing for gears, trying to downshift.
The SunTour just shifted as I wanted.

BTW, last year I resurrected an old touring Trek for a friend of mine. It had
a Campy Rally derailleur. It needed complete disassembly and lubricating. But
I was aware that even clean and lubed, it was going to shift pretty badly.

- Frank Krygowski

  #85  
Old February 25th 18, 03:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,137
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On 2018-02-24 13:51, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/24/2018 2:57 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/24/2018 2:57 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-23 10:01, Tim McNamara wrote:


In my reference, generators mounted on the seatstay or
chainstays would
be "rear triangle" mounted. Because the frame is the
ground (earth on
the east side of the Atlantic), a single wire ran through
the frame
tubes. It connected to a carbon brush in the head tube,
which me
contact with an insulated ring on the steerer tube. A
wire from that
traveled through the front rack to the headlight.


And ground went via the bearings like it does in most
European dynamos set-ups? That was always a sick concept.
I don't think in automotive anyone would let a blooper
like that pass a design review. Yet that was and maybe
still is standard fare on most dynamo-equiped bicycles.


I agree that grounding via the bike frame is a bad idea. But
it's always been possible to run a two-conductor cord and
ground things properly, which is what I've done at least
since 1980.

And AFAIK all hub dynamos have always used proper grounding
through a two-conductor cord.


Right and a fascinating history, too.
When the British invented vehicle electric systems they had to pick a
number and six is a good number so they went with 6v.



That was not a British decision. At least in Europe all cars had 6V
system until the 60's.


... Positive Earth
too, which is a good name for a garage band or a cult.



A guy at my bike pub stop came on a vintage UK motorcycle. When looking
at it together he remarked the positive ground and said that in the
country of Her Royal Majesty they just had to be different. IIRC some
French cars had that as well. French? Mon Dieu!


... Anyway over time
(usually a few months) they discovered that linen wrapped single wire
passing through punched panel holes will let the essential smoke out, at
which point the car stops.



Seriously? On a motor vehicle? When I was young I wound some
transformers and when in need of a low voltage high amp secondary
winding it was customary to use raw copper and wrap it with
lacquer-soaked linen. The lacquer-soaking was crucial. That lasts almost
forever, I still have one that was built before WW-II. Of course, this
technique is not suitable for anything that moves, flexes or rattles.

This also saved money but it probably was detrimental to the health for
a hobbyist. The only way to get the lacquer off the hands were harsh
chemicals.


... So Sturmey Archer went with double wire.
Keeps the smoke in better. All was well after that.


Using the frame as ground is ok but not across bearings or bushings of
any kind.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #86  
Old February 25th 18, 03:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,137
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On 2018-02-24 14:51, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 11:57:38 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-23 10:01, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Mon, 19 Feb 2018 08:29:16 -0800, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-02-18 14:21, Tim McNamara wrote:
Since stopping racing, though, I've converted everything back
to DT shifters. I use a handlebar bag on two of my bikes and
the extra cables interfere with that. Since I'm not racing,
the minor inconvenience of reaching down to shift is a moot
point for me. Plus- maybe this is a function of my
generation- I prefer the looks of DT shifters due to the
reduced cables sticking out the front. Once we have wireless
shifters that are reliable, ...

Then one sunny day it don't shift no more and the display
bluntly scrolls "An irrecoverable error has occurred. Please
can 1-800 ..." :-)

LOL! Funny because it's true. "Hang on, dudes, I have to reboot
my bike."


Almost. IIRC a guy had to bring his bike back to the shop because
new software had to be loaded to cure some suboptimal shifting
behavior. In the good old days pliers, wrenches and 15 minutes in
the garage sufficed, as it does on all my current bikes.


I'd rather upgrade software than have to toss out a POS
friction-shifting derailleur like an old Campy Rally or a lot of the
Simplex. Many derailleurs were suboptimal out of the box back in the
supposed golden era of cycling. And it's not like DT friction
shifters were immune from problems. SIS levers failed a lot.


Maybe I was lucky all those decades of my life. When I was young our
parents bought us catalog store bikes, the equivalent of what would be
Sears in the US. Those were bargain-basement road bikes. The shifters
worked great. Same on all those cheap department store road bikes I had
as a student. I wore out about one bike per year and the shifters and
derailers were never an issue. Same today, Deore XT on the MTB and ye
olde Shimano 600EX on the road bike.

The old MTB has Alivio where they messed up with the grease they put in
the shifter lever assemblies (gunks up and hardens fast). After flushing
all that out and using Tri-Flow oil it works great.

The only time derailers fail is on the MTB when they are hit by a
sizeable rock and get bent. I assume a Di2 derailer would suffer there
as well, except when it gets whacked one might not always be able to
hammer in back to working order out in the field.


I just got back from a ride on my UDi2 equipped Synapse -- which is
my fast rain bike. Worked like a charm. However, if I hadn't gotten
the bike with a crash-replacement discount and insurance money, I
wouldn't have bought Di2. The price differential is not worth it to
me. Cable STI works beautifully, although with the bizarre internal
cable routing these days, it can be a little stiff shifting on some
bikes.


Since my two main bikes have a big central battery I could probably use
Di2 without ever worrying about running out of juice. However, given
that the Shimano mechanical stuff works great I don't see a need, plus I
like the very fast shift across have a dozen cogs that the friction
shifter on my road bike affords.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #87  
Old February 25th 18, 04:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,442
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On 2/25/2018 9:56 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-24 14:51, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 11:57:38 AM UTC-8, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-02-23 10:01, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Mon, 19 Feb 2018 08:29:16 -0800, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-02-18 14:21, Tim McNamara wrote:
Since stopping racing, though, I've converted
everything back
to DT shifters. I use a handlebar bag on two of my
bikes and
the extra cables interfere with that. Since I'm not
racing,
the minor inconvenience of reaching down to shift is a
moot
point for me. Plus- maybe this is a function of my
generation- I prefer the looks of DT shifters due to the
reduced cables sticking out the front. Once we have
wireless
shifters that are reliable, ...

Then one sunny day it don't shift no more and the display
bluntly scrolls "An irrecoverable error has occurred.
Please
can 1-800 ..." :-)

LOL! Funny because it's true. "Hang on, dudes, I have
to reboot
my bike."


Almost. IIRC a guy had to bring his bike back to the shop
because
new software had to be loaded to cure some suboptimal
shifting
behavior. In the good old days pliers, wrenches and 15
minutes in
the garage sufficed, as it does on all my current bikes.


I'd rather upgrade software than have to toss out a POS
friction-shifting derailleur like an old Campy Rally or a
lot of the
Simplex. Many derailleurs were suboptimal out of the box
back in the
supposed golden era of cycling. And it's not like DT friction
shifters were immune from problems. SIS levers failed a lot.


Maybe I was lucky all those decades of my life. When I was
young our parents bought us catalog store bikes, the
equivalent of what would be Sears in the US. Those were
bargain-basement road bikes. The shifters worked great. Same
on all those cheap department store road bikes I had as a
student. I wore out about one bike per year and the shifters
and derailers were never an issue. Same today, Deore XT on
the MTB and ye olde Shimano 600EX on the road bike.

The old MTB has Alivio where they messed up with the grease
they put in the shifter lever assemblies (gunks up and
hardens fast). After flushing all that out and using
Tri-Flow oil it works great.

The only time derailers fail is on the MTB when they are hit
by a sizeable rock and get bent. I assume a Di2 derailer
would suffer there as well, except when it gets whacked one
might not always be able to hammer in back to working order
out in the field.


I just got back from a ride on my UDi2 equipped Synapse --
which is
my fast rain bike. Worked like a charm. However, if I
hadn't gotten
the bike with a crash-replacement discount and insurance
money, I
wouldn't have bought Di2. The price differential is not
worth it to
me. Cable STI works beautifully, although with the bizarre
internal
cable routing these days, it can be a little stiff
shifting on some
bikes.


Since my two main bikes have a big central battery I could
probably use Di2 without ever worrying about running out of
juice. However, given that the Shimano mechanical stuff
works great I don't see a need, plus I like the very fast
shift across have a dozen cogs that the friction shifter on
my road bike affords.


Well, duh. Of course a regular rock will wreck your Di2. You
need a Di2 compatible rock:
http://www.luckymojo.com/lodestone.html

and just 130 miles form Cameron Park too!

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #88  
Old February 25th 18, 05:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,096
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On Sunday, February 25, 2018 at 7:56:24 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-24 14:51, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 11:57:38 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-23 10:01, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Mon, 19 Feb 2018 08:29:16 -0800, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-02-18 14:21, Tim McNamara wrote:
Since stopping racing, though, I've converted everything back
to DT shifters. I use a handlebar bag on two of my bikes and
the extra cables interfere with that. Since I'm not racing,
the minor inconvenience of reaching down to shift is a moot
point for me. Plus- maybe this is a function of my
generation- I prefer the looks of DT shifters due to the
reduced cables sticking out the front. Once we have wireless
shifters that are reliable, ...

Then one sunny day it don't shift no more and the display
bluntly scrolls "An irrecoverable error has occurred. Please
can 1-800 ..." :-)

LOL! Funny because it's true. "Hang on, dudes, I have to reboot
my bike."


Almost. IIRC a guy had to bring his bike back to the shop because
new software had to be loaded to cure some suboptimal shifting
behavior. In the good old days pliers, wrenches and 15 minutes in
the garage sufficed, as it does on all my current bikes.


I'd rather upgrade software than have to toss out a POS
friction-shifting derailleur like an old Campy Rally or a lot of the
Simplex. Many derailleurs were suboptimal out of the box back in the
supposed golden era of cycling. And it's not like DT friction
shifters were immune from problems. SIS levers failed a lot.


Maybe I was lucky all those decades of my life. When I was young our
parents bought us catalog store bikes, the equivalent of what would be
Sears in the US. Those were bargain-basement road bikes. The shifters
worked great. Same on all those cheap department store road bikes I had
as a student. I wore out about one bike per year and the shifters and
derailers were never an issue. Same today, Deore XT on the MTB and ye
olde Shimano 600EX on the road bike.

The old MTB has Alivio where they messed up with the grease they put in
the shifter lever assemblies (gunks up and hardens fast). After flushing
all that out and using Tri-Flow oil it works great.

The only time derailers fail is on the MTB when they are hit by a
sizeable rock and get bent. I assume a Di2 derailer would suffer there
as well, except when it gets whacked one might not always be able to
hammer in back to working order out in the field.


I just got back from a ride on my UDi2 equipped Synapse -- which is
my fast rain bike. Worked like a charm. However, if I hadn't gotten
the bike with a crash-replacement discount and insurance money, I
wouldn't have bought Di2. The price differential is not worth it to
me. Cable STI works beautifully, although with the bizarre internal
cable routing these days, it can be a little stiff shifting on some
bikes.


Since my two main bikes have a big central battery I could probably use
Di2 without ever worrying about running out of juice. However, given
that the Shimano mechanical stuff works great I don't see a need, plus I
like the very fast shift across have a dozen cogs that the friction
shifter on my road bike affords.


Mechanical is fine for me, too, but friction is a retro novelty. By the time you reach down for your shifters, I've already gone through a half-dozen gears and still have five left. And I've shifted under power and gotten out of the saddle if necessary. The ramps, pins, profiles, etc. do make a difference with modern equipment. And with compact, a lot of what used to require a shift onto the small ring doesn't. There is no need to shift the whole block on a modern road bike.

SIS indexing would fail, but yes, the friction mode usually would work although lever loosening was common with a lot of DT levers.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #89  
Old February 26th 18, 03:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,137
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On 2018-02-25 08:29, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/25/2018 9:56 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-24 14:51, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 11:57:38 AM UTC-8, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-02-23 10:01, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Mon, 19 Feb 2018 08:29:16 -0800, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-02-18 14:21, Tim McNamara wrote:
Since stopping racing, though, I've converted
everything back
to DT shifters. I use a handlebar bag on two of my
bikes and
the extra cables interfere with that. Since I'm not
racing,
the minor inconvenience of reaching down to shift is a
moot
point for me. Plus- maybe this is a function of my
generation- I prefer the looks of DT shifters due to the
reduced cables sticking out the front. Once we have
wireless
shifters that are reliable, ...

Then one sunny day it don't shift no more and the display
bluntly scrolls "An irrecoverable error has occurred.
Please
can 1-800 ..." :-)

LOL! Funny because it's true. "Hang on, dudes, I have
to reboot
my bike."


Almost. IIRC a guy had to bring his bike back to the shop
because
new software had to be loaded to cure some suboptimal
shifting
behavior. In the good old days pliers, wrenches and 15
minutes in
the garage sufficed, as it does on all my current bikes.

I'd rather upgrade software than have to toss out a POS
friction-shifting derailleur like an old Campy Rally or a
lot of the
Simplex. Many derailleurs were suboptimal out of the box
back in the
supposed golden era of cycling. And it's not like DT friction
shifters were immune from problems. SIS levers failed a lot.


Maybe I was lucky all those decades of my life. When I was
young our parents bought us catalog store bikes, the
equivalent of what would be Sears in the US. Those were
bargain-basement road bikes. The shifters worked great. Same
on all those cheap department store road bikes I had as a
student. I wore out about one bike per year and the shifters
and derailers were never an issue. Same today, Deore XT on
the MTB and ye olde Shimano 600EX on the road bike.

The old MTB has Alivio where they messed up with the grease
they put in the shifter lever assemblies (gunks up and
hardens fast). After flushing all that out and using
Tri-Flow oil it works great.

The only time derailers fail is on the MTB when they are hit
by a sizeable rock and get bent. I assume a Di2 derailer
would suffer there as well, except when it gets whacked one
might not always be able to hammer in back to working order
out in the field.


I just got back from a ride on my UDi2 equipped Synapse --
which is
my fast rain bike. Worked like a charm. However, if I
hadn't gotten
the bike with a crash-replacement discount and insurance
money, I
wouldn't have bought Di2. The price differential is not
worth it to
me. Cable STI works beautifully, although with the bizarre
internal
cable routing these days, it can be a little stiff
shifting on some
bikes.


Since my two main bikes have a big central battery I could
probably use Di2 without ever worrying about running out of
juice. However, given that the Shimano mechanical stuff
works great I don't see a need, plus I like the very fast
shift across have a dozen cogs that the friction shifter on
my road bike affords.


Well, duh. Of course a regular rock will wreck your Di2.



Rocks kicked up by the front tire are very normal out here. Sometimes
they hit a pedal, sometimes the derailer, or both. Other times into a
shin and then some blood flows. When they hit the wide MTB downtube the
impact lets off a loud THWOCK sound. It's amazing how tough the aluminum
on the downtube is. Full of scrapes by now but no noticeable dents.

With Di2 a new derailer would cost north of $150 while a Deore derailer
can be had for around $50. Those things can also get mangled if some
tough vegetation gets tangled in there. Manzanita, chaparral shrubs and
such.


... You need a Di2 compatible rock:
http://www.luckymojo.com/lodestone.html

and just 130 miles form Cameron Park too!


And coincidentally one of the singletrack entrances here happens to be
on Mother Lode Drive :-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #90  
Old February 26th 18, 03:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,137
Default my fixie doesn't need improvement

On 2018-02-25 09:17, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, February 25, 2018 at 7:56:24 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-24 14:51, jbeattie wrote:


[...]

I just got back from a ride on my UDi2 equipped Synapse -- which
is my fast rain bike. Worked like a charm. However, if I hadn't
gotten the bike with a crash-replacement discount and insurance
money, I wouldn't have bought Di2. The price differential is not
worth it to me. Cable STI works beautifully, although with the
bizarre internal cable routing these days, it can be a little
stiff shifting on some bikes.


Since my two main bikes have a big central battery I could probably
use Di2 without ever worrying about running out of juice. However,
given that the Shimano mechanical stuff works great I don't see a
need, plus I like the very fast shift across have a dozen cogs that
the friction shifter on my road bike affords.


Mechanical is fine for me, too, but friction is a retro novelty. By
the time you reach down for your shifters, I've already gone through
a half-dozen gears and still have five left.



I can reach down a lot faster than that :-)

From the drops to the lever is only a small paw swing.


... And I've shifted under
power and gotten out of the saddle if necessary. The ramps, pins,
profiles, etc. do make a difference with modern equipment. And with
compact, a lot of what used to require a shift onto the small ring
doesn't. There is no need to shift the whole block on a modern road
bike.


If I ever have to replace the whole drive train I will sure go for
compact, or triple with granny gear. Though even when on the 52T up
front I often shift from 3rd largest to smallest cog in a second.


SIS indexing would fail, but yes, the friction mode usually would
work although lever loosening was common with a lot of DT levers.


My friction shifters are a bit loose now but I had no choice other than
slight greasing. They had become so noisy that the squeak upon a gear
shift made riders up front turn around.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SELF IMPROVEMENT RETURNS ! datakoll Techniques 1 November 19th 09 01:06 AM
improvement of countries Andre Racing 25 September 20th 08 02:50 AM
Driver Improvement Schemes rola UK 4 February 15th 07 08:15 PM
Improvement :-D wafflycat UK 16 March 30th 05 11:04 AM
Fixie frame found, Fuji Questions, and WTB fixie cranks, wheels,bb, seat,& rear rack Tim Lines Techniques 0 August 17th 03 09:52 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.