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  #61  
Old March 5th 18, 08:33 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: 2,919
Default rubber compounds

On Mon, 05 Mar 2018 06:54:18 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

The inside wall is made of some sort of stone
material (it engulfs a chimney) but yes, it is
colder than the outside walls which are wood.
No condensation tho. Now it's 19.2C/21% but
everything still feels cold. Perhaps it is my
own immune system...


I'm currently at 15.6C and 42%RH inside and quite comfortable. At
19.2C, it's still a little cold, but with such low RH, you should be
feeling only slightly cold.

Are there any more tests save for the
temperature/humidity? The reason I ask is every
time I wake up I'm completely out of my head.
It improves rapidly tho but even after a really
good they the sleep and morning is the same,
awful. I Googled the symptoms and it matches
perfectly "brain fog" and hypoxia! But I'm only
at 15-25 MASL so that should be
impossible, right?


Does this only happen in the winter when you are burning firewood or
running a gas/propane/oil heater? If so, methinks you should test for
carbon monoxide. Buy or borrow a CO meter (not a smoke/CO detector)
and measure the CO accumulation:
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=carbon+monoxide+meter
https://www.detectcarbonmonoxide.com/co-health-risks/
The meters/monitors are slow to respond at low concentrations. The
sensor also has a limited life, usually 5 to 8 years depending on
chemistry and technology used:
https://www.fayengineering.com/articles/carbon-monoxide-has-your-carbon-monoxide-alarm-expired

I've found that my home CO level is fairly low (5-8 ppm) all night,
except for a big spike (25 ppm) just as the fire dies down in the
early morning. CO is produced by incomplete combustion.
https://www.abe.iastate.edu/extension-and-outreach/carbon-monoxide-poisoning-checking-for-complete-combustion-aen-175/

A fingertip pulse oxymeter MIGHT show a lack of oxygen:
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=fingertip+pulse+oxymeter
However, for CO poisoning, they're not a good indicator. I would get
one anyway in case your problem is caused by sleep apnea.
https://www.amperordirect.com/pc//z-pulse-oximeter-sleep-apnea.html



[1] http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573/bike/wood-td-2018.jpg


Nice, but please post smaller photos.

I have an assortment of felling axes, splitting axes, hatchets, mauls,
wedges, and hammers. I rarely use them, except for the hatchets,
which I use to chop up kindling.
--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
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  #62  
Old March 5th 18, 10:16 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 1,035
Default rubber compounds

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

CO meter (not a smoke/CO detector) [...]
A fingertip pulse oxymeter


Great, thanks a lot!

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #63  
Old March 5th 18, 09:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,415
Default rubber compounds

On 3/5/2018 2:33 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 05 Mar 2018 06:54:18 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

The inside wall is made of some sort of stone
material (it engulfs a chimney) but yes, it is
colder than the outside walls which are wood.
No condensation tho. Now it's 19.2C/21% but
everything still feels cold. Perhaps it is my
own immune system...


I'm currently at 15.6C and 42%RH inside and quite comfortable. At
19.2C, it's still a little cold, but with such low RH, you should be
feeling only slightly cold.


Emanuel should keep in mind that his 19.2C is air temperature. If it's
much colder outside and if the walls have too little insulation, their
surface may be significantly colder. In that situation, one's body loses
heat by radiation to the cold surfaces. That can be quite uncomfortable.
It's the opposite of the comfortable feel one gets from the radiant heat
of a fireplace or similar source.

Over one winter I worked in a tiny company sited in a huge concrete
block building, a former auto body shop. The lab areas had no heat
except a radiant tube heater up towards the ceiling fueled by natural
gas. Despite the low air temperature (maybe 15C) it was quite
comfortable under that pipe. But anywhere else in that area, one felt
chilly indeed.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #64  
Old March 6th 18, 12:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,919
Default rubber compounds

On Mon, 05 Mar 2018 10:16:54 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
CO meter (not a smoke/CO detector) [...]
A fingertip pulse oxymeter


Great, thanks a lot!


Please take carbon monoxide exposure seriously. Long term exposure
can cause weakening of the heart muscles, independent of oxygen
deprivation effects:
https://www.google.com/search?q=carbon+monoxide+heart+effects

I suggest that you buy some kind of CO detector as soon as possible to
make sure you don't have a problem. I think a chemical exposure tag
might be the fastest:
http://www.sportys.com/pilotshop/carbon-monoxide-detector.html
http://www.mypilotstore.com/MyPilotStore/sep/4420
http://www.lifttruckstuff.com/lifttruckstuff.com/product/productdetail.aspx?d=6&p=77
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Carbon-Monoxide-Detector-CA101/100173604
https://www.maplin.co.uk/p/carbon-monoxide-detector-patches-gg65v
Try pilots supply shops, industrial auto supplies, and fire fighters
suppliers.

Response time sucks on these detectors so be prepared for an overnight
test:
100 PPM 15-45 min
200 PPM 4-5 min
300 PPM 2-4 min
400 PPM 1-4 min

Also, keep them away from household cleaner fumes, chlorinated
hydrocarbon solvents, air "freshener", and incense which will ruin the
chemical detector.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #65  
Old March 6th 18, 12:27 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,919
Default rubber compounds

On Mon, 05 Mar 2018 15:15:32 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

Mo
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Sleep-Safe-Carbon-Monoxide-Detector-2-Cards-Per-Pack-Card-Sensor-Visual-Aid/221789512112
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Carbon-Monoxide-Detector-Twin-Pack-/122996481684
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Arctic-Hayes-PH019AC-Sleepsafe-CO-Detector-White-Pack-of-2-/112675779953

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #66  
Old March 14th 18, 12:35 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 1,035
Default rubber compounds

Summary of below message:

Why is the %RH so high in the carpentry? Do the
sawdust bind the humidity or something like
that? Anyway it is a complete disaster to work
there now; I can only be active for like 10-15m
before I have to get inside to recover. I can
feel literally how my mental/physical health
deteriorates every minute I'm there!


preassure
tempC %RH mb/hPa insulation feeling heat
--------------------------------------------------------------
studio 20.9 21 OK comfy 3 oil
carpentry 6.0 59 1003 poor sickening 1 fan
bakery 5 poor OK 1 oil
bike WS 1 none OK none


Here in the studio, where I have 3 oil heaters,
it is now 20.9C with 21%RH which is pretty
comfy. Most areas still have a coldish touch,
tho much less so than before when outdoor
temperature was some -10 to -15C (now its -1 or
0C).

In the carpentry, which is in the same wood
building but it has a lesser degree of
insulation, and also instead of the three oil
heaters only a single heat fan, it is
6.0C and 59%RH with 1003 mb/hPa. Here, it is
extreamly unpleasant - I cut a plank and filed
it with power tools in 10m or so and still
reacted very negatively with coldness and
coughing my brains out until I got out.

Bakery: 5C with one oil heater; insulation poor.

Bike workshop: 1C with no insulation, and next
to the front door which is opened all the time,
including to access the carpentry.

Both bakery and bike workshop are not
unpleasant to work in, tho fiddling with cold
tools quickly makes your hands cold
like instantly.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #67  
Old March 14th 18, 06:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,919
Default rubber compounds

On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 00:35:53 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

Why is the %RH so high in the carpentry?


You may have a heat leak somewhere in the room, which is dripping
water into the room. It might be inside the walls, where you can't
see the water. The rather low 6.0C temperature might be an indication
that the insulation is failing due to water absorption.

Also, oil heaters remove water from the air. It's common to use a
humidifier with an oil heater.
https://learn.compactappliance.com/heaters-humidifiers-during-winter/

Do the
sawdust bind the humidity or something like
that?


Yes, it does.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5StVDxqODLI
Weigh identical volumes of wet and dry sawdust and compare. If
sawdust takes water out of the air, then the air humidity should
decrease, which it hasn't. Something is wrong but without additional
numbers, my best guess is water in the carpentry insulation.
(Incidentally, in the USA, we call it the "wood shop").

pressure
tempC %RH mb/hPa insulation feeling heat
--------------------------------------------------------------
studio 20.9 21 OK comfy 3 oil
carpentry 6.0 59 1003 poor sickening 1 fan
bakery 5 poor OK 1 oil
bike WS 1 none OK none

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #68  
Old March 15th 18, 04:45 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,182
Default rubber compounds

On Wed, 14 Mar 2018 00:35:53 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

tho fiddling with cold
tools quickly makes your hands cold
like instantly.


Take an old pair of very thick wool socks such as Big R's "ragg"
socks. Slide them over your hand, letting your thumb stick out
through the hole in the heel. Cut the toes off at your knuckles.

It helps a lot, particularly if the leg covers most of your forearm. I
can knit and type wearing "wristers"; wrenches should not be a
problem. (Though mine were a closer-fitting custom-knitted pair.)

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
  #69  
Old March 15th 18, 11:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default rubber compounds

Joy Beeson wrote:

Take an old pair of very thick wool socks
such as Big R's "ragg" socks. Slide them over
your hand, letting your thumb stick out
through the hole in the heel. Cut the toes
off at your knuckles.

It helps a lot, particularly if the leg
covers most of your forearm. I can knit and
type wearing "wristers"; wrenches should not
be a problem. (Though mine were
a closer-fitting custom-knitted pair.)


I have "torghandlarhandskar" (literally square
seller gloves) which are gloves with cut ends
at the fingertips. But the forearm stuff was
new to me. I have many Merino wool socks so one
of them would be optimal, I think.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #70  
Old March 18th 18, 06:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default rubber compounds

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Also, oil heaters remove water from the air.
It's common to use a humidifier with an
oil heater.


The water that is removed from the air, isn't
this the same as in relative humidity? If so
that is right now 20%RH which should be
fine, right?

Another thing I was thinking about is all the
computer gear and equipment that is on
24/7/365+1. Typing this, I have a projector
some 15-20 cm from my head. Is this anything to
be concerned about and do you have a gadget to
measure that as well?

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
 




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