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The lone 26er in a forest full of 29ers and 27.5ers



 
 
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  #61  
Old March 2nd 18, 10:14 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ned Mantei
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Posts: 63
Default The lone 26er in a forest full of 29ers and 27.5ers

On 01-03-18 16:33, jbeattie wrote:

Shall we start a discussion about the long almost invisible leashes? Boy the really **** me off.


That is a serious hazard. I have many personal anecdotes, but the most memorable was defending a case where a guy broke his neck after getting a leash wrapped up in his wheel. The dog owner was a deadbeat, so he sued the maker of his CF forks -- which not surprisingly broke after getting a leash wrapped up in the wheel.

More often, though, I encounter dogs that aren't on leashes and should be. I yell at the owners as I'm being charged while climbing or descending a forest road, and the owners just stare or blandly call for the dog. The dog just keeps doing what its doing. My wife got knocked over by a big dog, which is no small issue because of her physical condition, and the response was a lame "oh, he just wants to say hello," or "he likes you" or some utter idiocy. This is in places with giant signs saying dogs must be on leashes. And again, off leash dogs have a huge environmental impact on watershed and forest animals.

-- Jay Beattie.


Once I was riding past a farm and a large dog bit me on the ankle.
Probably intended only as a threat, since it didn't draw blood. For a
long time afterwards and even now I am on the lookout for farm dogs.

Closer to the city it's the tiny "barky" dogs that seem potentially
dangerous. As I sometimes point out to their owners, it would be a
bloody mess, both for the dog and for me, if the dog were to get into
the spokes of my bike.


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  #62  
Old March 2nd 18, 09:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,137
Default The lone 26er in a forest full of 29ers and 27.5ers

On 2018-03-01 22:38, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 01 Mar 2018 14:10:49 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-03-01 13:45, John B. wrote:


[...]

... But a critter kept just so you could pet it or
it could lay it's head in your lap? I can't remember a single
instance.


Lots of older women back then had a cat in the kitchen that sat in their
lap a lot. Sometimes for more than an hour when they were knitting
something. The kitchen used to be the largest room in the house where
everyone generally hung out. The dog usually also had its pillow there.


When I think back I don't remember any farm wives, i.e., women that
actually had to do things every day, that had a cat in the kitchen. If
for not other reason then they "get under foot" when you are trying to
do something and a woman that cooks for, oh say, a family of 4 or 5,
does the washing, and has a few chickens out back, and maybe a small
garden for the herbs and spices, doesn't have much time for sitting
around knitting.



Maybe they should learn some time management. Where I grew up they were
able to eke out "off time". It wasn't really off time but the needlework
was to make clothing.


... And as for the dog having a bed in the kitchen, that
would have been a no-no. Dogs stink.


Not true. I regularly meet working dogs. They somehow sense that I like
dogs and come up close. None of the stank so far.


Maybe not a modern town dog that goes to the dog beautician for a wash
and perm every month, but I can assure you that a "working" dog,
whether a young lad's companion or one that herds sheep stinks. After
all, the only bath they get is when they are caught out in the rain
:-)

Many farmers had a good personal relationship with some of their horses.
They spent time with them outside work. Even if it was just to smoke a
pipe and not be bothered by people. Horses tend not to nag and they are
pleasant to be around.


When I was a young fellow there were still a few farmers left that
were farming with a team and my father owned a couple of Quarter
Horses for some years and I'm not sure how "personal" a relationship
existed between horses and men. If for no other reason then a horse
can be almost unbelievably stupid.



So can people and that's not a reason not to like them. At least not for me.


... Or perhaps extremely self centered
:-) You haul a manger full of hay down for the critter, dish out some
oats, haul in a bucket of water and when you start you start to brush
the mud out of his tail, he kicks you.


They can be materialistic but the ones I frequently encounter aren't.
They like me even when I arrive sans carrots. Though the trunk on my MTB
often gets sniffed for potential goodies in there.

[...]

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #63  
Old March 2nd 18, 11:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 3,967
Default The lone 26er in a forest full of 29ers and 27.5ers

On Fri, 02 Mar 2018 13:02:46 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-03-01 22:38, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 01 Mar 2018 14:10:49 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-03-01 13:45, John B. wrote:


[...]

... But a critter kept just so you could pet it or
it could lay it's head in your lap? I can't remember a single
instance.


Lots of older women back then had a cat in the kitchen that sat in their
lap a lot. Sometimes for more than an hour when they were knitting
something. The kitchen used to be the largest room in the house where
everyone generally hung out. The dog usually also had its pillow there.


When I think back I don't remember any farm wives, i.e., women that
actually had to do things every day, that had a cat in the kitchen. If
for not other reason then they "get under foot" when you are trying to
do something and a woman that cooks for, oh say, a family of 4 or 5,
does the washing, and has a few chickens out back, and maybe a small
garden for the herbs and spices, doesn't have much time for sitting
around knitting.



Maybe they should learn some time management. Where I grew up they were
able to eke out "off time". It wasn't really off time but the needlework
was to make clothing.


... And as for the dog having a bed in the kitchen, that
would have been a no-no. Dogs stink.


Not true. I regularly meet working dogs. They somehow sense that I like
dogs and come up close. None of the stank so far.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_odor
"All natural dog odors are most prominent near the ears, and from the
paw pads. Dogs naturally produce secretions, the function of which is
to produce scents allowing for species and individual animal
recognition by other dogs and for use in scent-marking of territory.
This is a feature they share with other canids"...

"Another source of odor that can be considered natural results from a
common dog behavior. Dogs like to roll in and mark themselves with the
feces of other animals in their environment."


Maybe not a modern town dog that goes to the dog beautician for a wash
and perm every month, but I can assure you that a "working" dog,
whether a young lad's companion or one that herds sheep stinks. After
all, the only bath they get is when they are caught out in the rain
:-)

Many farmers had a good personal relationship with some of their horses.
They spent time with them outside work. Even if it was just to smoke a
pipe and not be bothered by people. Horses tend not to nag and they are
pleasant to be around.


When I was a young fellow there were still a few farmers left that
were farming with a team and my father owned a couple of Quarter
Horses for some years and I'm not sure how "personal" a relationship
existed between horses and men. If for no other reason then a horse
can be almost unbelievably stupid.



So can people and that's not a reason not to like them. At least not for me.


... Or perhaps extremely self centered
:-) You haul a manger full of hay down for the critter, dish out some
oats, haul in a bucket of water and when you start you start to brush
the mud out of his tail, he kicks you.


They can be materialistic but the ones I frequently encounter aren't.
They like me even when I arrive sans carrots. Though the trunk on my MTB
often gets sniffed for potential goodies in there.

[...]


I'm not sure that the animal, other then some dogs, actually feels any
emotion for a human. Horses, for example, will react to most people
that pet them.

Dogs, perhaps because they have "pack instincts", do appear to develop
an emotional relationship to the "Alpha" animal". Google
"Saint Guinefort" or "Hachiko".
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #64  
Old March 2nd 18, 11:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,137
Default The lone 26er in a forest full of 29ers and 27.5ers

On 2018-03-02 15:22, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 02 Mar 2018 13:02:46 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-03-01 22:38, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 01 Mar 2018 14:10:49 -0800, Joerg
wrote:


[...]

... And as for the dog having a bed in the kitchen, that
would have been a no-no. Dogs stink.


Not true. I regularly meet working dogs. They somehow sense that I like
dogs and come up close. None of the stank so far.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_odor
"All natural dog odors are most prominent near the ears, and from the
paw pads. Dogs naturally produce secretions, the function of which is
to produce scents allowing for species and individual animal
recognition by other dogs and for use in scent-marking of territory.
This is a feature they share with other canids"...


Everyone who is somewhat knowledgeable about animals knows that dogs
perspire via their paws. So of course those smell. That does not mean
the whole dog has to smell, just like a human does not have to smell
just because he has sweaty feet.

There is very little smell near the ears.


"Another source of odor that can be considered natural results from a
common dog behavior. Dogs like to roll in and mark themselves with the
feces of other animals in their environment."


Some do. Just like some people like to slather themselves with cheap
perfume that I find grossly repulsive. That still does not cause me to
say that people stink. Because many don't.

[...]

... Or perhaps extremely self centered
:-) You haul a manger full of hay down for the critter, dish out some
oats, haul in a bucket of water and when you start you start to brush
the mud out of his tail, he kicks you.


They can be materialistic but the ones I frequently encounter aren't.
They like me even when I arrive sans carrots. Though the trunk on my MTB
often gets sniffed for potential goodies in there.

[...]


I'm not sure that the animal, other then some dogs, actually feels any
emotion for a human. Horses, for example, will react to most people
that pet them.


They do but they usually need to know you. There is a large horse ranch
on the singletrack to Placerville which I ride a lot. Some of the horses
come to the fence when they see me approaching yet they know I never
bring them treats because that isn't appropriate unless I have
permission. I never asked there because it's also a boarding place where
I would't allow it if I were the property owner.

Those horses like to meet me, affection without expecting anything in
return. While some like their noses rubbed others do not like to be
touched at all yet they come. One day two other MTB riders were standing
at the fence trying to cajole the horses into coming. They couldn't be
bothered until I joined up. Why would they come if they didn't feel some
emotional bond?


Dogs, perhaps because they have "pack instincts", do appear to develop
an emotional relationship to the "Alpha" animal". Google
"Saint Guinefort" or "Hachiko".



Many other animals seek such pack relationship and the alpha can also be
a human.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #65  
Old March 3rd 18, 12:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default The lone 26er in a forest full of 29ers and 27.5ers

On Fri, 02 Mar 2018 15:56:14 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-03-02 15:22, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 02 Mar 2018 13:02:46 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-03-01 22:38, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 01 Mar 2018 14:10:49 -0800, Joerg
wrote:


[...]

... And as for the dog having a bed in the kitchen, that
would have been a no-no. Dogs stink.


Not true. I regularly meet working dogs. They somehow sense that I like
dogs and come up close. None of the stank so far.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_odor
"All natural dog odors are most prominent near the ears, and from the
paw pads. Dogs naturally produce secretions, the function of which is
to produce scents allowing for species and individual animal
recognition by other dogs and for use in scent-marking of territory.
This is a feature they share with other canids"...


Everyone who is somewhat knowledgeable about animals knows that dogs
perspire via their paws. So of course those smell. That does not mean
the whole dog has to smell, just like a human does not have to smell
just because he has sweaty feet.

There is very little smell near the ears.


"Another source of odor that can be considered natural results from a
common dog behavior. Dogs like to roll in and mark themselves with the
feces of other animals in their environment."


Some do. Just like some people like to slather themselves with cheap
perfume that I find grossly repulsive. That still does not cause me to
say that people stink. Because many don't.

But people do stink. If you have ever been around really primitive
people you will find that they do have a rather powerful odor.

Note that perfumes and all of their derivatives were developed to
counter the odor of unbathed humans.


[...]

... Or perhaps extremely self centered
:-) You haul a manger full of hay down for the critter, dish out some
oats, haul in a bucket of water and when you start you start to brush
the mud out of his tail, he kicks you.


They can be materialistic but the ones I frequently encounter aren't.
They like me even when I arrive sans carrots. Though the trunk on my MTB
often gets sniffed for potential goodies in there.

[...]


I'm not sure that the animal, other then some dogs, actually feels any
emotion for a human. Horses, for example, will react to most people
that pet them.


They do but they usually need to know you. There is a large horse ranch
on the singletrack to Placerville which I ride a lot. Some of the horses
come to the fence when they see me approaching yet they know I never
bring them treats because that isn't appropriate unless I have
permission. I never asked there because it's also a boarding place where
I would't allow it if I were the property owner.

Those horses like to meet me, affection without expecting anything in
return. While some like their noses rubbed others do not like to be
touched at all yet they come. One day two other MTB riders were standing
at the fence trying to cajole the horses into coming. They couldn't be
bothered until I joined up. Why would they come if they didn't feel some
emotional bond?


Probably because they recognize you as a source of carrots, apples, or
other goodies. I suggest that if you give $10 to the next guy you see
begging on the street you will invoke exactly the same "emotional
bond" that you note with the horses. When he sees you he will be right
there with his hand out.



Dogs, perhaps because they have "pack instincts", do appear to develop
an emotional relationship to the "Alpha" animal". Google
"Saint Guinefort" or "Hachiko".



Many other animals seek such pack relationship and the alpha can also be
a human.


The word "animal" comes from the Latin animalis, meaning having
breath, having soul or living being. The biological definition of the
word refers to all members of the kingdom Animalia.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #66  
Old March 3rd 18, 12:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sepp Ruf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 178
Default The lone 26er in a forest full of 29ers and 27.5ers

John B. wrote:
On Fri, 02 Mar 2018 15:56:14 -0800, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-02 15:22, John B. wrote:


I'm not sure that the animal, other then some dogs, actually feels any
emotion for a human. Horses, for example, will react to most people
that pet them.


They do but they usually need to know you. There is a large horse ranch
on the singletrack to Placerville which I ride a lot. Some of the horses
come to the fence when they see me approaching yet they know I never
bring them treats because that isn't appropriate unless I have
permission. I never asked there because it's also a boarding place where
I would't allow it if I were the property owner.

Those horses like to meet me, affection without expecting anything in
return. While some like their noses rubbed others do not like to be
touched at all yet they come. One day two other MTB riders were standing
at the fence trying to cajole the horses into coming. They couldn't be
bothered until I joined up. Why would they come if they didn't feel some
emotional bond?


Probably because they recognize you as a source of carrots, apples, or
other goodies. I suggest that if you give $10 to the next guy you see
begging on the street you will invoke exactly the same "emotional
bond" that you note with the horses. When he sees you he will be right
there with his hand out.


But he claims has not fed those horses.

Maybe Jorge does look more like a friendly animal than the other bicyclists?
Though I suspect the horses saw his large bags or smelled grainy brewing
substance residue or his homemade muesli bars -- while the other MTB riders
only had small backpacks and smelled like racer guys who had thrown
non-tasty plastic bottles and gel wrappers into their habitat.
  #67  
Old March 3rd 18, 03:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,087
Default The lone 26er in a forest full of 29ers and 27.5ers

On Saturday, March 3, 2018 at 4:07:49 AM UTC-8, Sepp Ruf wrote:
John B. wrote:
On Fri, 02 Mar 2018 15:56:14 -0800, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-03-02 15:22, John B. wrote:


I'm not sure that the animal, other then some dogs, actually feels any
emotion for a human. Horses, for example, will react to most people
that pet them.

They do but they usually need to know you. There is a large horse ranch
on the singletrack to Placerville which I ride a lot. Some of the horses
come to the fence when they see me approaching yet they know I never
bring them treats because that isn't appropriate unless I have
permission. I never asked there because it's also a boarding place where
I would't allow it if I were the property owner.

Those horses like to meet me, affection without expecting anything in
return. While some like their noses rubbed others do not like to be
touched at all yet they come. One day two other MTB riders were standing
at the fence trying to cajole the horses into coming. They couldn't be
bothered until I joined up. Why would they come if they didn't feel some
emotional bond?


Probably because they recognize you as a source of carrots, apples, or
other goodies. I suggest that if you give $10 to the next guy you see
begging on the street you will invoke exactly the same "emotional
bond" that you note with the horses. When he sees you he will be right
there with his hand out.


But he claims has not fed those horses.

Maybe Jorge does look more like a friendly animal than the other bicyclists?
Though I suspect the horses saw his large bags or smelled grainy brewing
substance residue or his homemade muesli bars -- while the other MTB riders
only had small backpacks and smelled like racer guys who had thrown
non-tasty plastic bottles and gel wrappers into their habitat.


The horses obviously feel some magical and spiritual bond with Joerg, particularly the rainbow colored ones. http://images6.fanpop.com/image/phot...-2048-1536.jpg

If Joerg has created an "emotional" bond with the horse, which emotion? Perhaps the horse is plotting an escape, and is cultivating a false friendship with Joerg to ultimately use his body as a battering ram to break-down the paddock fence. Those horses are super-smart and cagey. Perhaps the horse has spotted a rube and is setting him up for some sort of con. Maybe while he's petting one horse, another horse is taking his wallet. I've seen them do that.

-- Jay Beattie.

 




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