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rim notation



 
 
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  #11  
Old March 11th 18, 04:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,437
Default rim notation

On 3/11/2018 11:24 AM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
AMuzi wrote:

3-spline sprockets are cheap and ubiquitous.
They're 'quick change' in that the previous
versions (mostly prewar) were all screw-on
track sprockets. Standard format fits
Sturmey, Shimano, SRAM-Sachs-F&S-Torpedo,
Bendix, Durex, Centrix, and so on right down
to $5 chinese child's coaster hubs. You can
mix-n-match across brands and tooth count,
change your gearing every morning if you
like, sizes range 13t to 24t.


Another thing I have thought about doing is to
flip the sprocket which has an inclination and
is facing inwards by design/default, but
flipping it might be better than padding with
spacers/washers to get a better chain line, if
indeed it can be done without complications as
I suspect it can?


That is why sizes over 16t are offset, providing two positions.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


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  #12  
Old March 12th 18, 04:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,879
Default rim notation

On 3/11/2018 12:24 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
AMuzi wrote:

3-spline sprockets are cheap and ubiquitous.
They're 'quick change' in that the previous
versions (mostly prewar) were all screw-on
track sprockets. Standard format fits
Sturmey, Shimano, SRAM-Sachs-F&S-Torpedo,
Bendix, Durex, Centrix, and so on right down
to $5 chinese child's coaster hubs. You can
mix-n-match across brands and tooth count,
change your gearing every morning if you
like, sizes range 13t to 24t.


Another thing I have thought about doing is to
flip the sprocket which has an inclination and
is facing inwards by design/default, but
flipping it might be better than padding with
spacers/washers to get a better chain line, if
indeed it can be done without complications as
I suspect it can?


Emanuel, with all due respect, have you considered buying a book?


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #13  
Old March 12th 18, 04:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 820
Default rim notation

Frank Krygowski wrote:

Emanuel, with all due respect, have you
considered buying a book?


These are the ones I have acquired or borrowed
from the public library. The road bike books
obviously don't cover the Torpedo rear hub, and
the Swedish books are mechanically at a lower
level than that, the Dutch one maybe covers it
but I don't read the language - it has some
good illos tho so I wouldn't rule it out.
"Effective cycling" I gave up on as it was so
boring to read with very few illustrations and
a tiresome focus on policy/traffic issues which
I can't influence anyway.

@book{complete-road-bike-maintenance,
author = {Guy Andrews},
ISBN = {978 1 4081 7093 9},
publisher = {Bloomsbury},
title = {Complete Road Bike Maintenance},
year = 2013
}

@book{en-cyklo-pedi,
author = {Johan Tell},
ISBN = {978-91-1-307337-8},
publisher = {Nordstedt},
title = {En cyklo pedi},
year = 2016
}

@book{effective-cycling,
author = {John Forester},
ISBN = {978-0-262-51694-5},
publisher = {Cambridge},
title = {Effective Cycling},
year = 2012
}

@book{bike,
author = {Daniel Benson and Richard Moore},
ISBN = 9781781312346,
publisher = {Aurum},
title = {Bike! A Tribute to the World's Greatest Cycling Designers},
year = 2014
}

@book{cykelbok,
author = {Staffan Skott},
ISBN = {91-550-3942-1},
publisher = {Tiden},
title = {Cykelbok},
year = 1994
}

@book{praktisch-fietsboek,
author = {Rob van der Plas},
ISBN = {90 274 9848 2},
publisher = {Spectrum},
title = {Praktisch Fietsboek},
year = 1984
}

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #14  
Old March 12th 18, 04:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 820
Default rim notation

These are the ones I have acquired or
borrowed from the public library. The road
bike books obviously don't cover the Torpedo
rear hub


Actually "Bike!" does have a section on
Sturmey-Archer! However only some random
cultural/historic notes, certainly no
component-component tutorial...

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #15  
Old March 12th 18, 05:26 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 820
Default rim notation

Frank Krygowski wrote:

Emanuel, with all due respect, have you
considered buying a book?


Why don't you and Liebermann write one?
AMuzi can then fill in the blanks using his own
posts that are already written and John B.
can finish the manuscript by providing one
story per chapter under "Bike Lore" (with the
letter O a spoked wheel), again just a matter
of reusing posts from rec.bicycles.tech .
I'm sure I'm forgetting someone here tho but
that will only make the book even better when
he joins as well. And yes, I promise to read
it, instantly.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #16  
Old March 12th 18, 01:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,437
Default rim notation

On 3/11/2018 11:55 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Frank Krygowski wrote:

Emanuel, with all due respect, have you
considered buying a book?


These are the ones I have acquired or borrowed
from the public library. The road bike books
obviously don't cover the Torpedo rear hub, and
the Swedish books are mechanically at a lower
level than that, the Dutch one maybe covers it
but I don't read the language - it has some
good illos tho so I wouldn't rule it out.
"Effective cycling" I gave up on as it was so
boring to read with very few illustrations and
a tiresome focus on policy/traffic issues which
I can't influence anyway.

@book{complete-road-bike-maintenance,
author = {Guy Andrews},
ISBN = {978 1 4081 7093 9},
publisher = {Bloomsbury},
title = {Complete Road Bike Maintenance},
year = 2013
}

@book{en-cyklo-pedi,
author = {Johan Tell},
ISBN = {978-91-1-307337-8},
publisher = {Nordstedt},
title = {En cyklo pedi},
year = 2016
}

@book{effective-cycling,
author = {John Forester},
ISBN = {978-0-262-51694-5},
publisher = {Cambridge},
title = {Effective Cycling},
year = 2012
}

@book{bike,
author = {Daniel Benson and Richard Moore},
ISBN = 9781781312346,
publisher = {Aurum},
title = {Bike! A Tribute to the World's Greatest Cycling Designers},
year = 2014
}

@book{cykelbok,
author = {Staffan Skott},
ISBN = {91-550-3942-1},
publisher = {Tiden},
title = {Cykelbok},
year = 1994
}

@book{praktisch-fietsboek,
author = {Rob van der Plas},
ISBN = {90 274 9848 2},
publisher = {Spectrum},
title = {Praktisch Fietsboek},
year = 1984
}



You might consider a review of basic principles and prior
art besides consumer 'how to' books:

https://www.alibris.com/booksearch?k...&hs.x=0&hs.y=0

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #17  
Old March 12th 18, 01:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 820
Default rim notation

AMuzi wrote:

Standard format fits Sturmey, Shimano,
SRAM-Sachs-F&S-Torpedo, Bendix, Durex,
Centrix, and so on right down to $5 chinese
child's coaster hubs.


I have also come across a Swedish coaster hub
called Nova which I'd place no later than the
1960s. Always when I see one it is spoked to
the kind of "deep" rim which looks like the
letter V and has a centerline of holes for the
spokes at the bottom of the valley, also the
rim has small brackets or oval washers between
inside the rim and the spoke nipple heads, and
those are common areas of corrosion (?) or
other material loss of freshness. Next time
I see one I'll examine if the sprocket is
standard 3-spline on this hub as well...

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #18  
Old March 12th 18, 03:10 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,879
Default rim notation

On 3/12/2018 12:55 AM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Frank Krygowski wrote:

Emanuel, with all due respect, have you
considered buying a book?


These are the ones I have acquired or borrowed
from the public library. The road bike books
obviously don't cover the Torpedo rear hub, and
the Swedish books are mechanically at a lower
level than that, the Dutch one maybe covers it
but I don't read the language - it has some
good illos tho so I wouldn't rule it out.
"Effective cycling" I gave up on as it was so
boring to read with very few illustrations and
a tiresome focus on policy/traffic issues which
I can't influence anyway.

@book{complete-road-bike-maintenance,
author = {Guy Andrews},
ISBN = {978 1 4081 7093 9},
publisher = {Bloomsbury},
title = {Complete Road Bike Maintenance},
year = 2013
}

@book{en-cyklo-pedi,
author = {Johan Tell},
ISBN = {978-91-1-307337-8},
publisher = {Nordstedt},
title = {En cyklo pedi},
year = 2016
}

@book{effective-cycling,
author = {John Forester},
ISBN = {978-0-262-51694-5},
publisher = {Cambridge},
title = {Effective Cycling},
year = 2012
}

@book{bike,
author = {Daniel Benson and Richard Moore},
ISBN = 9781781312346,
publisher = {Aurum},
title = {Bike! A Tribute to the World's Greatest Cycling Designers},
year = 2014
}

@book{cykelbok,
author = {Staffan Skott},
ISBN = {91-550-3942-1},
publisher = {Tiden},
title = {Cykelbok},
year = 1994
}

@book{praktisch-fietsboek,
author = {Rob van der Plas},
ISBN = {90 274 9848 2},
publisher = {Spectrum},
title = {Praktisch Fietsboek},
year = 1984
}


I'm not familiar with most of those. Here are books that I have (all in
English) that might help you.

I have two Rob van der Plas books that seem appropriate for you. One is
_Bicycle Technology_ from 1991. Another is _The Bicycle Repair Book_
from 1993. Both are published by Bicycle Books Inc., Mill Valley
California. Both cover lots of basics and seem intended for novices.
Unlike most modern books, these discuss things like coaster brakes, rod
actuated brakes, 3 speed hubs, and more than the usual amount of basic
mechanical practices.

A similar approach is used in any of the various books by Richard
Ballantine. Several of his books (_Richard's Bicycle Book_, _Richard's
21st Century Bicycle Book_ etc.) confine mechanical repairs to just the
last short chapter, but he's also written _Richard's Bicycle Repair
Manual_, which I don't own. I suspect it would be good for you. I've
enjoyed his writing on other aspects of cycling.

_The Big Blue Book of Bicycle Repair_ from Park Tools USA by C. Calvin
Jones is good for modern sport bike components - at least, "modern" up
to 2005, which is my edition. It won't be much help for coaster brakes
brakes and utility bikes.

I have a year 2000 edition of Leonard Zinn's _Zinn & the Art of Road
Bike Maintenance_. It seems pretty good.

I have others, even older, but I think those would serve you well. And
as I've mentioned www.abebooks.com is a good and very inexpensive source
of used books. I hope it, or a similar used book source, is available in
your country

Of course, I hope by now you've spent a lot of time at Sheldon Brown's
site, http://www.sheldonbrown.com/ and you've used the Park Tool site's
"Repair Help" section. https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #19  
Old March 12th 18, 03:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 820
Default rim notation

I have also come across a Swedish coaster hub
called Nova


*Novo

which I'd place no later than the 1960s.
Always when I see one it is spoked to the
kind of "deep" rim which looks like the
letter V and has a centerline of holes for
the spokes at the bottom of the valley


What are the implication of this spoke/rim
interface? Less lateral strength and more
difficult to true the wheel?

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #20  
Old March 12th 18, 03:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 820
Default rim notation

Frank Krygowski wrote:

I'm not familiar with most of those. Here are
books that I have (all in English) that might
help you [...]


Excellent, I'll return to this when
I acquire/read them, God willing.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
 




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