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  #141  
Old June 30th 20, 08:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 8,988
Default Government Bicycle Program News

On 6/30/2020 1:00 PM, wrote:
On Monday, June 29, 2020 at 5:38:34 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:
On 6/29/2020 1:12 PM,
wrote:

snip

I am in the middle of Iowa. I know the owner of the Trek bike shop in town but have never talked to him about where his shop earns its revenue. Expensive or cheap bikes, accessories, clothing, mechanical service, etc. That would probably be a fun talk. I ride with a group of adult bicyclists. Avid bicyclists I guess since we ride once or twice a week in the good weather months. They all have multiple bikes each. And NONE of them have $500 and under bikes. $1000 is the very cheapest bike anyone rides. Of course I realize the adult bicyclists I ride with may not represent adult bicyclists very well. We are all probably money hungry grubbing elitists with college degrees. The horror!!!!


You and your friends might be the typical customers at a Trek shop, but
you're not the typical customer at a bike shop not catering to pro
wannabees.


Maybe. But everyone I ride with is in his 50s, 60s, 70s. I doubt there are too many of them or me with professional bicycling dreams. None of them are poor. They all have sufficient money. And like to ride bikes. So maybe not representative of adult bicyclists across the country. Spending $1-2000 or more on a bicycle every few years is not a big deal.


I remember riding across Iowa and stopping in some little downtown cafe
for breakfast. I felt a little odd wearing riding clothes when everyone
else looked like farmers, wearing jeans or overalls and John Deere caps.

Then a couple farmers came over to chat. One of them said back in the
1970s he used to ride a Raleigh International. The other guy mentioned
some other high-end Raleigh that he had. Those were bikes I used to
drool over.

It was a pleasant conversation.

--
- Frank Krygowski
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  #142  
Old June 30th 20, 10:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 1,640
Default Government Bicycle Program News

On Tuesday, June 30, 2020 at 2:39:46 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 6/30/2020 1:00 PM, wrote:
On Monday, June 29, 2020 at 5:38:34 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:
On 6/29/2020 1:12 PM,
wrote:

snip

I am in the middle of Iowa. I know the owner of the Trek bike shop in town but have never talked to him about where his shop earns its revenue. Expensive or cheap bikes, accessories, clothing, mechanical service, etc. That would probably be a fun talk. I ride with a group of adult bicyclists. Avid bicyclists I guess since we ride once or twice a week in the good weather months. They all have multiple bikes each. And NONE of them have $500 and under bikes. $1000 is the very cheapest bike anyone rides. Of course I realize the adult bicyclists I ride with may not represent adult bicyclists very well. We are all probably money hungry grubbing elitists with college degrees. The horror!!!!

You and your friends might be the typical customers at a Trek shop, but
you're not the typical customer at a bike shop not catering to pro
wannabees.


Maybe. But everyone I ride with is in his 50s, 60s, 70s. I doubt there are too many of them or me with professional bicycling dreams. None of them are poor. They all have sufficient money. And like to ride bikes. So maybe not representative of adult bicyclists across the country. Spending $1-2000 or more on a bicycle every few years is not a big deal.


I remember riding across Iowa and stopping in some little downtown cafe
for breakfast. I felt a little odd wearing riding clothes when everyone
else looked like farmers, wearing jeans or overalls and John Deere caps.

Then a couple farmers came over to chat. One of them said back in the
1970s he used to ride a Raleigh International. The other guy mentioned
some other high-end Raleigh that he had. Those were bikes I used to
drool over.

It was a pleasant conversation.

--
- Frank Krygowski


RAGBRAI was started back in the early 1970s. Its possible these farmers may have taken part in one of the early rides. There were a few hundred people on the first one. That bloomed to a few thousand on the years after. Then the tens of thousands in more recent years.
  #143  
Old June 30th 20, 10:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,640
Default Government Bicycle Program News

On Tuesday, June 30, 2020 at 2:31:23 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:
On 6/30/2020 10:00 AM, wrote:
On Monday, June 29, 2020 at 5:38:34 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:
On 6/29/2020 1:12 PM,
wrote:

snip

I am in the middle of Iowa. I know the owner of the Trek bike shop in town but have never talked to him about where his shop earns its revenue. Expensive or cheap bikes, accessories, clothing, mechanical service, etc. That would probably be a fun talk. I ride with a group of adult bicyclists. Avid bicyclists I guess since we ride once or twice a week in the good weather months. They all have multiple bikes each. And NONE of them have $500 and under bikes. $1000 is the very cheapest bike anyone rides. Of course I realize the adult bicyclists I ride with may not represent adult bicyclists very well. We are all probably money hungry grubbing elitists with college degrees. The horror!!!!

You and your friends might be the typical customers at a Trek shop, but
you're not the typical customer at a bike shop not catering to pro
wannabees.


Maybe. But everyone I ride with is in his 50s, 60s, 70s. I doubt there are too many of them or me with professional bicycling dreams. None of them are poor. They all have sufficient money. And like to ride bikes. So maybe not representative of adult bicyclists across the country. Spending $1-2000 or more on a bicycle every few years is not a big deal.


I'm my next door neighbor's bicycle repair person and assembler. They
are not poor. So far, during the pandemic, they've bought two Linus
bicycles for the mom and teenage daughter, and I assembled them. The dad
has a Dahon. They are looking for a bicycle for their 12 year old son,
but due to the current bicycle shortage they have been unsuccessful, so
he rides the Dahon for now, and the dad rides some older hybrid. $600 is
about their limit for new bicycles. They are not going on 25 mile or
longer rides. They might do 15 miles.


We have different definitions of adult bicyclists. I know maybe technically any adult who rides a bicycle meets the definition. But I only consider people who ride frequently for 30-40-50-60 miles at a time as bicyclists. Others may ride a bicycle, but riding once or twice a year with the kids on the trails for an hour or two doesn't qualify for me. So the low cost bikes you mention would be the appropriate tool for those tasks.

An analogy might be someone living in town planting a big garden. They till the soil, plant the seeds, harvest the crops. So they can consider themselves a farmer? Or I work on my own bikes and bikes for friends, so I am a bike mechanic? Not that I could not be one if given a chance, but I would not label myself as one at the moment.


The bicycle shops in this area usually have plenty of bicycle in the
$400-600 price range. Maybe not the pro-level shops, but the "regular
shops." Supposedly, bicycle shops are going to be restocked sometime in
July or August.

  #144  
Old June 30th 20, 10:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 116
Default Government Bicycle Program News

wrote:
On Tuesday, June 30, 2020 at 2:31:23 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:
On 6/30/2020 10:00 AM,
wrote:
On Monday, June 29, 2020 at 5:38:34 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:
On 6/29/2020 1:12 PM,
wrote:

snip

I am in the middle of Iowa. I know the owner of the Trek bike shop
in town but have never talked to him about where his shop earns its
revenue. Expensive or cheap bikes, accessories, clothing, mechanical
service, etc. That would probably be a fun talk. I ride with a
group of adult bicyclists. Avid bicyclists I guess since we ride
once or twice a week in the good weather months. They all have
multiple bikes each. And NONE of them have $500 and under bikes.
$1000 is the very cheapest bike anyone rides. Of course I realize
the adult bicyclists I ride with may not represent adult bicyclists
very well. We are all probably money hungry grubbing elitists with
college degrees. The horror!!!!

You and your friends might be the typical customers at a Trek shop, but
you're not the typical customer at a bike shop not catering to pro
wannabees.

Maybe. But everyone I ride with is in his 50s, 60s, 70s. I doubt
there are too many of them or me with professional bicycling dreams.
None of them are poor. They all have sufficient money. And like to
ride bikes. So maybe not representative of adult bicyclists across the
country. Spending $1-2000 or more on a bicycle every few years is not a big deal.


I'm my next door neighbor's bicycle repair person and assembler. They
are not poor. So far, during the pandemic, they've bought two Linus
bicycles for the mom and teenage daughter, and I assembled them. The dad
has a Dahon. They are looking for a bicycle for their 12 year old son,
but due to the current bicycle shortage they have been unsuccessful, so
he rides the Dahon for now, and the dad rides some older hybrid. $600 is
about their limit for new bicycles. They are not going on 25 mile or
longer rides. They might do 15 miles.


We have different definitions of adult bicyclists. I know maybe
technically any adult who rides a bicycle meets the definition. But I
only consider people who ride frequently for 30-40-50-60 miles at a time
as bicyclists. Others may ride a bicycle, but riding once or twice a
year with the kids on the trails for an hour or two doesn't qualify for
me. So the low cost bikes you mention would be the appropriate tool for those tasks.

An analogy might be someone living in town planting a big garden. They
till the soil, plant the seeds, harvest the crops. So they can consider
themselves a farmer? Or I work on my own bikes and bikes for friends, so
I am a bike mechanic? Not that I could not be one if given a chance, but
I would not label myself as one at the moment.


The bicycle shops in this area usually have plenty of bicycle in the
$400-600 price range. Maybe not the pro-level shops, but the "regular
shops." Supposedly, bicycle shops are going to be restocked sometime in
July or August.



For me the way to quantify the cost of a bike is on a per kilometre basis.
A 200 dollar Walmart bike that’s ridden twice a year is more expensive than
a 6000 dollar road bike that’s ridden 10000 km a year.

  #145  
Old June 30th 20, 11:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 116
Default Government Bicycle Program News

sms wrote:
On 6/30/2020 10:00 AM, wrote:
On Monday, June 29, 2020 at 5:38:34 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:
On 6/29/2020 1:12 PM,
wrote:

snip

I am in the middle of Iowa. I know the owner of the Trek bike shop in
town but have never talked to him about where his shop earns its
revenue. Expensive or cheap bikes, accessories, clothing, mechanical
service, etc. That would probably be a fun talk. I ride with a group
of adult bicyclists. Avid bicyclists I guess since we ride once or
twice a week in the good weather months. They all have multiple bikes
each. And NONE of them have $500 and under bikes. $1000 is the very
cheapest bike anyone rides. Of course I realize the adult bicyclists
I ride with may not represent adult bicyclists very well. We are all
probably money hungry grubbing elitists with college degrees. The horror!!!!

You and your friends might be the typical customers at a Trek shop, but
you're not the typical customer at a bike shop not catering to pro
wannabees.


Maybe. But everyone I ride with is in his 50s, 60s, 70s. I doubt there
are too many of them or me with professional bicycling dreams. None of
them are poor. They all have sufficient money. And like to ride bikes.
So maybe not representative of adult bicyclists across the country.
Spending $1-2000 or more on a bicycle every few years is not a big deal.


I'm my next door neighbor's bicycle repair person and assembler. They
are not poor. So far, during the pandemic, they've bought two Linus
bicycles for the mom and teenage daughter, and I assembled them. The dad
has a Dahon. They are looking for a bicycle for their 12 year old son,
but due to the current bicycle shortage they have been unsuccessful, so
he rides the Dahon for now, and the dad rides some older hybrid. $600 is
about their limit for new bicycles. They are not going on 25 mile or
longer rides. They might do 15 miles.

The bicycle shops in this area usually have plenty of bicycle in the
$400-600 price range. Maybe not the pro-level shops, but the "regular
shops." Supposedly, bicycle shops are going to be restocked sometime in
July or August.



Funny but your “pro wannabes” is remarkably similar to one of your favorite
posters here.

  #146  
Old July 1st 20, 12:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,988
Default Government Bicycle Program News

On 6/29/2020 9:15 PM, jbeattie wrote:


Pro wannabees? A f****** Homer Hillbilly frame goes for $1,500. https://www.rivbike.com/collections/...products/homer A Jan Heine approved handlebar bag goes for $300. https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop...-side-pockets/ You don't have to be a pro wannabe to dump a ton of money on a bike.


I agree. To me, "pro wannabe" implies someone working hard and perhaps
spending hard to be fast or look fast. Others can spend considerable
money on bikes with other objectives.

See
http://www.historyspaces.com/u-s-his...age-of-excess/


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #147  
Old July 1st 20, 01:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,043
Default Government Bicycle Program News

On 6/30/2020 2:42 PM, wrote:

We have different definitions of adult bicyclists. I know maybe technically any adult who rides a bicycle meets the definition. But I only consider people who ride frequently for 30-40-50-60 miles at a time as bicyclists. Others may ride a bicycle, but riding once or twice a year with the kids on the trails for an hour or two doesn't qualify for me. So the low cost bikes you mention would be the appropriate tool for those tasks.


We do have different definitions.

I consider transportational cyclists, whether they are school-age
children, tech professionals, day workers, or retirees, as cyclists.

They will often ride 10 miles or less at a time. For these cyclists, a
$500 bicycle is at the high end of what they would spend. I'm thrilled
when they spend $500 at a bicycle shop (or REI or Sports Basement or
even Dick's Sporting Goods) instead of $100-200 for a piece of junk at
Walmart or Target.

Sometimes the bicycles that these individuals want aren't even sold at
bicycle shops. My wife wanted a specific kind of bicycle for commuting.
Low stepover frame, Townie or Cruiser bars, and full gearing (not a one
speed). Got it at now defunct Sports Authority. She's been riding it to
work for 8.5 years. About 9 miles each way. It was under $400 back then.
  #148  
Old July 1st 20, 02:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,043
Default Government Bicycle Program News

On 6/30/2020 5:59 PM, sms wrote:

snip

She's been riding it to work for 8.5 years.


Actually 10.5 years. Not sure if anything on the bike is still original.
  #150  
Old July 1st 20, 11:46 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 9,895
Default Government Bicycle Program News

This is an embarrassing conversation, especially for those of you who claim to be socialists. Once upon a time a workingman saved up several weeks' wages to pay for his bike. And I think it was Jobst who referred us to historical pieces about how poor Italians and Frenchman would take cocaine to keep riding the banked circle in those 24-hour races (somewhat similar to modern Japanese keirin) that were popular between the wars, or to excel in road races, because it was their only way out of appalling poverty.

Now you guys are arguing whether a thousand dollar bike is "cheap"!

Andre Jute
No, St Peter, I don't know any of these limousine liberals. To the flames with them.

On Tuesday, June 30, 2020 at 2:15:57 AM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, June 29, 2020 at 3:38:34 PM UTC-7, sms wrote:
On 6/29/2020 1:12 PM, wrote:

snip

I am in the middle of Iowa. I know the owner of the Trek bike shop in town but have never talked to him about where his shop earns its revenue. Expensive or cheap bikes, accessories, clothing, mechanical service, etc. That would probably be a fun talk. I ride with a group of adult bicyclists. Avid bicyclists I guess since we ride once or twice a week in the good weather months. They all have multiple bikes each. And NONE of them have $500 and under bikes. $1000 is the very cheapest bike anyone rides. Of course I realize the adult bicyclists I ride with may not represent adult bicyclists very well. We are all probably money hungry grubbing elitists with college degrees. The horror!!!!


You and your friends might be the typical customers at a Trek shop, but
you're not the typical customer at a bike shop not catering to pro
wannabees.


Pro wannabees? A f****** Homer Hillbilly frame goes for $1,500.
https://www.rivbike.com/collections/...products/homer A Jan Heine approved handlebar bag goes for $300. https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop...-side-pockets/ You don't have to be a pro wannabe to dump a ton of money on a bike. A Schwalbe Marathon is more than a nice dinner out with drinks. You can dump $2K on a Marin belt-drive commuter over at JoeBike. https://www.joe-bike.com/product/mar...dio-4-4668.htm

And the Trek shop is full of non-pro-wannabe bikes, at least the Trek shop(s) in my town. https://www.bikegallery.com/product-list/bikes-1000/

Is it full of cheap bikes? Nooooo. Oddly, all the people I know who want a cheap bike (admittedly, a small number of people) will not buy off the interweb. I had that conversation with a client just today. So they will find a shop with something cheap, which probably means REI or some place like NoPo Bikeworks. http://www.northportlandbikeworks.com/jamis-bikes.html Still looking at $600-700.

The "family bike shops" around here, not the Specialized or Trek tied
shops, as well as the sporting goods stores with real bicycle
departments (REI and Sports Basement) sell a lot of bicycles in the
sub-$1000 range. And of course you have the big box stores like Walmart
selling BSOs in the $100-200 range, and the sporting goods stores like
Dick's that are selling stuff in the $300-500 range. You also have
online sales like from Linus, and bikesdirect.com.


Family bike shop around he https://www.splendidcycles.com/splen...ty3ab0ylkarcf7 The dreaded motorized Momcycles. The bicycle version of a speeding truck with a triple-trailer.

-- Jay Beattie.

 




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