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Riding on an empty stomach



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 23rd 07, 01:45 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Ken C. M.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 263
Default Riding on an empty stomach

I have come to the certain conclusion that this is a bad thing. I have
done it a couple of times now, and have not had a very good experience
with it. This morning I had time. I got up made a cup of coffee,
checked email and such, and the weather wasn't perfect but not raining
and not to chilly. So I headed out for a /fast/ ride. I have a route
that is not too long, long enough where I can get a decent workout. Its
about 12 miles and I can usually average 15.5 mph or so. Today managed
16.0 mph but when I got home my stomach was not liking the ride, or more
correctly stated not like the ride on an empty stomach.

Ken
--
The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets
old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without
shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
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  #2  
Old January 23rd 07, 03:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Roger Zoul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,118
Default Riding on an empty stomach

I much prefer to ride on an empty stomach and eat either during or after.
different strokes.

Ken C. M. wrote:
:: I have come to the certain conclusion that this is a bad thing. I
:: have done it a couple of times now, and have not had a very good
:: experience with it. This morning I had time. I got up made a cup of
:: coffee, checked email and such, and the weather wasn't perfect but
:: not raining and not to chilly. So I headed out for a /fast/ ride. I
:: have a route that is not too long, long enough where I can get a
:: decent workout. Its about 12 miles and I can usually average 15.5
:: mph or so. Today managed
:: 16.0 mph but when I got home my stomach was not liking the ride, or
:: more correctly stated not like the ride on an empty stomach.
::
:: Ken
:: --
:: The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it
:: gets old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one
:: without shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong


  #3  
Old January 23rd 07, 03:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Ken C. M.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 263
Default Riding on an empty stomach

Roger Zoul wrote:
I much prefer to ride on an empty stomach and eat either during or after.
different strokes.


I guess it really depends on the intensity of the ride, Roger, I can
ride at a slower pace ride the same route and average 14.5 to 15.0 on an
empty stomach and it won't bother me. But if I turn up the intensity
like I did this morning I experience a definite discomfort.

Ken
--
The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets
old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without
shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
  #4  
Old January 23rd 07, 04:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Roger Zoul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,118
Default Riding on an empty stomach

Ken C. M. wrote:
:: Roger Zoul wrote:
::: I much prefer to ride on an empty stomach and eat either during or
::: after. different strokes.
:::
::
:: I guess it really depends on the intensity of the ride, Roger, I can
:: ride at a slower pace ride the same route and average 14.5 to 15.0
:: on an empty stomach and it won't bother me. But if I turn up the
:: intensity like I did this morning I experience a definite discomfort.

I can ride easy after eating, but not hard. If I want to ride hard, I need
to make sure i'm fully glycogen loaded in the muscles, but I definitely
don't want a full belly. Of course, I don't need to feel as if I'm
straving, either. If I eat a good carby meal at dinner, I can ride hard
(after a warm up) the morning after.

I'm not really sure of what discomfort you're describing. Do you feel bad
in your stomach (as in hungry) after a hard ride?


  #5  
Old January 23rd 07, 05:18 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Marz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 610
Default Riding on an empty stomach


Ken C. M. wrote:
I have come to the certain conclusion that this is a bad thing. I have
done it a couple of times now, and have not had a very good experience
with it. This morning I had time. I got up made a cup of coffee,
checked email and such, and the weather wasn't perfect but not raining
and not to chilly. So I headed out for a /fast/ ride. I have a route
that is not too long, long enough where I can get a decent workout. Its
about 12 miles and I can usually average 15.5 mph or so. Today managed
16.0 mph but when I got home my stomach was not liking the ride, or more
correctly stated not like the ride on an empty stomach.

Ken
--
The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets
old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without
shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong



You bonked out. You stomach ran out of food to metabolize and your body
had to switch to stored fat to fuel your cycling. Sometimes your body
will continue to attempt to metabolize food you don't have which can
lead to a slight feeling of nausea. Some people bonk train on purpose,
I do sometimes, to burn more fat and improve endurance. The idea is to
head out on an empty stomach, cycling at 60% max for about an hour
(never more than 90mins, or so I've read). In theory your body will be
burning stored fat while you ride.

It's a training program that must be approached with caution as it can
have negative side effects, like your body will begin to burn muscle
mass if you ride for too long without food.

If you do want to bonk train always eat something as soon as you get
home, preferably something with protein.

If you don't, always grab a small bit before you go ride.

  #6  
Old January 23rd 07, 05:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Ken C. M.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 263
Default Riding on an empty stomach

Roger Zoul wrote:
Ken C. M. wrote:
:: Roger Zoul wrote:
::: I much prefer to ride on an empty stomach and eat either during or
::: after. different strokes.
:::
::
:: I guess it really depends on the intensity of the ride, Roger, I can
:: ride at a slower pace ride the same route and average 14.5 to 15.0
:: on an empty stomach and it won't bother me. But if I turn up the
:: intensity like I did this morning I experience a definite discomfort.

I can ride easy after eating, but not hard. If I want to ride hard, I need
to make sure i'm fully glycogen loaded in the muscles, but I definitely
don't want a full belly. Of course, I don't need to feel as if I'm
straving, either. If I eat a good carby meal at dinner, I can ride hard
(after a warm up) the morning after.

I'm not really sure of what discomfort you're describing. Do you feel bad
in your stomach (as in hungry) after a hard ride?


Well by riding on an empty stomach, I mean pretty much just that EMPTY,
expect for a cup of coffee I had while checking email. I wouldn't try a
real hard ride on a full stomach either, just a little something, like
my morning bagel probably, which I skipped, probably wouldn't have
bothered me much, but would have been enough where I wouldn't have
experienced the discomfort. And by discomfort I mean a sort of upset /
hungry feeling that quickly went away after eating my morning bagel
after the ride.

Ken
--
The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets
old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without
shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
  #7  
Old January 23rd 07, 05:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Ken C. M.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 263
Default Riding on an empty stomach

Marz wrote:
Ken C. M. wrote:
I have come to the certain conclusion that this is a bad thing. I have
done it a couple of times now, and have not had a very good experience
with it. This morning I had time. I got up made a cup of coffee,
checked email and such, and the weather wasn't perfect but not raining
and not to chilly. So I headed out for a /fast/ ride. I have a route
that is not too long, long enough where I can get a decent workout. Its
about 12 miles and I can usually average 15.5 mph or so. Today managed
16.0 mph but when I got home my stomach was not liking the ride, or more
correctly stated not like the ride on an empty stomach.

Ken
--
The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets
old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without
shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong



You bonked out. You stomach ran out of food to metabolize and your body
had to switch to stored fat to fuel your cycling. Sometimes your body
will continue to attempt to metabolize food you don't have which can
lead to a slight feeling of nausea. Some people bonk train on purpose,
I do sometimes, to burn more fat and improve endurance. The idea is to
head out on an empty stomach, cycling at 60% max for about an hour
(never more than 90mins, or so I've read). In theory your body will be
burning stored fat while you ride.

Yeah that /slight feeling of nausea/ is sort of how I would describe it.
That and a hungry feeling combined. I have heard that term /bonked out/
before but never really understood what was meant by it.

It's a training program that must be approached with caution as it can
have negative side effects, like your body will begin to burn muscle
mass if you ride for too long without food.

Which is why after a moderate to intense ride, usually have a whey
protein shake. I have heard that protein is very important to build and
maintaining muscle mass.

If you do want to bonk train always eat something as soon as you get
home, preferably something with protein.

See above.

Thats pretty interesting info. I clearly did not like the feeling. I
have experienced it before, and it's not a very good feeling.

Ken
--
The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets
old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without
shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
  #8  
Old January 23rd 07, 05:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Roger Zoul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,118
Default Riding on an empty stomach

Ken C. M. wrote:
:: Marz wrote:
::: Ken C. M. wrote:
:::: I have come to the certain conclusion that this is a bad thing. I
:::: have done it a couple of times now, and have not had a very good
:::: experience with it. This morning I had time. I got up made a cup
:::: of coffee, checked email and such, and the weather wasn't perfect
:::: but not raining and not to chilly. So I headed out for a /fast/
:::: ride. I have a route that is not too long, long enough where I can
:::: get a decent workout. Its about 12 miles and I can usually average
:::: 15.5 mph or so. Today managed
:::: 16.0 mph but when I got home my stomach was not liking the ride,
:::: or more correctly stated not like the ride on an empty stomach.
::::
:::: Ken
:::: --
:::: The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it
:::: gets old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one
:::: without shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
:::
:::
::: You bonked out. You stomach ran out of food to metabolize and your
::: body had to switch to stored fat to fuel your cycling. Sometimes
::: your body will continue to attempt to metabolize food you don't
::: have which can lead to a slight feeling of nausea. Some people bonk
::: train on purpose, I do sometimes, to burn more fat and improve
::: endurance. The idea is to head out on an empty stomach, cycling at
::: 60% max for about an hour (never more than 90mins, or so I've
::: read). In theory your body will be burning stored fat while you
::: ride.
:::
:: Yeah that /slight feeling of nausea/ is sort of how I would describe
:: it. That and a hungry feeling combined. I have heard that term
:: /bonked out/ before but never really understood what was meant by it.

Bonked out is what happens when you deplete glycogen stores from the muscles
and liver. It's not just that you're hungry or out of energy, because you
body has plenty of energy stored. Simply eating the wrong foods (like on a
low-carb diet) or starting in a glycogen-depeted state can lead to bonking
out quickly if you do the right kind of activity. Frankly, I don't think you
bonked out, as when you do you're so lacking in energy that it's even hard
to pedal.

::
::: It's a training program that must be approached with caution as it
::: can have negative side effects, like your body will begin to burn
::: muscle mass if you ride for too long without food.
:::
:: Which is why after a moderate to intense ride, usually have a whey
:: protein shake. I have heard that protein is very important to build
:: and maintaining muscle mass.

For recovery, a 4-to-1 ratio of carbs to protein is claimed to be good.

::
::: If you do want to bonk train always eat something as soon as you get
::: home, preferably something with protein.
:::
:: See above.
::
:: Thats pretty interesting info. I clearly did not like the feeling. I
:: have experienced it before, and it's not a very good feeling.

You can store about 2000 kcals of glycogen in your muscles, so it is
possible to ride a good long way and hard before bonking. However, it
really does depend on your daily diet and the type of activity you do. A
good carby meal the night before can prevent bonking provided you don't ride
too hard for too long. Intensity and duration both play a part in the
equation. Ride easy and you're tend not to use much glycogen (and you can
go longer without bonking). Ride hard and you use more (which brings on the
bonk quicker). Ride easy and you tend to use more fat for fuel. Ride hard
and you tend to use less fat for fuel. The body sort of has a sliding
scale - hard -- glycogen, easy -- fat, while engaged in exercise.

Eating something carby during your ride can help, too. That Gu stuff comes
to mind.


::
:: Ken
:: --
:: The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it
:: gets old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one
:: without shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong


  #9  
Old January 23rd 07, 05:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Ken C. M.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 263
Default Riding on an empty stomach

Roger Zoul wrote:
Ken C. M. wrote:
:: Marz wrote:
::: Ken C. M. wrote:
:::: I have come to the certain conclusion that this is a bad thing. I
:::: have done it a couple of times now, and have not had a very good
:::: experience with it. This morning I had time. I got up made a cup
:::: of coffee, checked email and such, and the weather wasn't perfect
:::: but not raining and not to chilly. So I headed out for a /fast/
:::: ride. I have a route that is not too long, long enough where I can
:::: get a decent workout. Its about 12 miles and I can usually average
:::: 15.5 mph or so. Today managed
:::: 16.0 mph but when I got home my stomach was not liking the ride,
:::: or more correctly stated not like the ride on an empty stomach.
::::
:::: Ken
:::: --
:::: The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it
:::: gets old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one
:::: without shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
:::
:::
::: You bonked out. You stomach ran out of food to metabolize and your
::: body had to switch to stored fat to fuel your cycling. Sometimes
::: your body will continue to attempt to metabolize food you don't
::: have which can lead to a slight feeling of nausea. Some people bonk
::: train on purpose, I do sometimes, to burn more fat and improve
::: endurance. The idea is to head out on an empty stomach, cycling at
::: 60% max for about an hour (never more than 90mins, or so I've
::: read). In theory your body will be burning stored fat while you
::: ride.
:::
:: Yeah that /slight feeling of nausea/ is sort of how I would describe
:: it. That and a hungry feeling combined. I have heard that term
:: /bonked out/ before but never really understood what was meant by it.

Bonked out is what happens when you deplete glycogen stores from the muscles
and liver. It's not just that you're hungry or out of energy, because you
body has plenty of energy stored. Simply eating the wrong foods (like on a
low-carb diet) or starting in a glycogen-depeted state can lead to bonking
out quickly if you do the right kind of activity. Frankly, I don't think you
bonked out, as when you do you're so lacking in energy that it's even hard
to pedal.

::
::: It's a training program that must be approached with caution as it
::: can have negative side effects, like your body will begin to burn
::: muscle mass if you ride for too long without food.
:::
:: Which is why after a moderate to intense ride, usually have a whey
:: protein shake. I have heard that protein is very important to build
:: and maintaining muscle mass.

For recovery, a 4-to-1 ratio of carbs to protein is claimed to be good.

::
::: If you do want to bonk train always eat something as soon as you get
::: home, preferably something with protein.
:::
:: See above.
::
:: Thats pretty interesting info. I clearly did not like the feeling. I
:: have experienced it before, and it's not a very good feeling.

You can store about 2000 kcals of glycogen in your muscles, so it is
possible to ride a good long way and hard before bonking. However, it
really does depend on your daily diet and the type of activity you do. A
good carby meal the night before can prevent bonking provided you don't ride
too hard for too long. Intensity and duration both play a part in the
equation. Ride easy and you're tend not to use much glycogen (and you can
go longer without bonking). Ride hard and you use more (which brings on the
bonk quicker). Ride easy and you tend to use more fat for fuel. Ride hard
and you tend to use less fat for fuel. The body sort of has a sliding
scale - hard -- glycogen, easy -- fat, while engaged in exercise.

Eating something carby during your ride can help, too. That Gu stuff comes
to mind.


::
:: Ken
:: --
:: The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it
:: gets old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one
:: without shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong



Well I guess without a medical exam by a medical professional, its hard
to say exactly what the feeling was, but in my experience, I don't ride
very well on an empty stomach, although thats not quite true, as 16mph
average on that route is one of my fastest recorded times for that ride.
But it was a nasty sort of feeling when I got home, and was definitely
glad when I had my protein shake and the morning bagel.

Ken
--
The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets
old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without
shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
  #10  
Old January 23rd 07, 06:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Roger Zoul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,118
Default Riding on an empty stomach

Ken C. M. wrote:
:: Roger Zoul wrote:
::: Ken C. M. wrote:
::::: Marz wrote:
:::::: Ken C. M. wrote:
::::::: I have come to the certain conclusion that this is a bad thing.
::::::: I have done it a couple of times now, and have not had a very
::::::: good experience with it. This morning I had time. I got up
::::::: made a cup of coffee, checked email and such, and the weather
::::::: wasn't perfect but not raining and not to chilly. So I headed
::::::: out for a /fast/ ride. I have a route that is not too long,
::::::: long enough where I can get a decent workout. Its about 12
::::::: miles and I can usually average
::::::: 15.5 mph or so. Today managed
::::::: 16.0 mph but when I got home my stomach was not liking the ride,
::::::: or more correctly stated not like the ride on an empty stomach.
:::::::
::::::: Ken
::::::: --
::::::: The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when
::::::: it gets old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new
::::::: one without shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
::::::
::::::
:::::: You bonked out. You stomach ran out of food to metabolize and
:::::: your body had to switch to stored fat to fuel your cycling.
:::::: Sometimes your body will continue to attempt to metabolize food
:::::: you don't have which can lead to a slight feeling of nausea.
:::::: Some people bonk train on purpose, I do sometimes, to burn more
:::::: fat and improve endurance. The idea is to head out on an empty
:::::: stomach, cycling at 60% max for about an hour (never more than
:::::: 90mins, or so I've read). In theory your body will be burning
:::::: stored fat while you ride.
::::::
::::: Yeah that /slight feeling of nausea/ is sort of how I would
::::: describe it. That and a hungry feeling combined. I have heard
::::: that term /bonked out/ before but never really understood what
::::: was meant by it.
:::
::: Bonked out is what happens when you deplete glycogen stores from
::: the muscles and liver. It's not just that you're hungry or out of
::: energy, because you body has plenty of energy stored. Simply
::: eating the wrong foods (like on a low-carb diet) or starting in a
::: glycogen-depeted state can lead to bonking out quickly if you do
::: the right kind of activity. Frankly, I don't think you bonked out,
::: as when you do you're so lacking in energy that it's even hard to
::: pedal.
:::
:::::
:::::: It's a training program that must be approached with caution as
:::::: it can have negative side effects, like your body will begin to
:::::: burn muscle mass if you ride for too long without food.
::::::
::::: Which is why after a moderate to intense ride, usually have a whey
::::: protein shake. I have heard that protein is very important to
::::: build and maintaining muscle mass.
:::
::: For recovery, a 4-to-1 ratio of carbs to protein is claimed to be
::: good.
:::
:::::
:::::: If you do want to bonk train always eat something as soon as you
:::::: get home, preferably something with protein.
::::::
::::: See above.
:::::
::::: Thats pretty interesting info. I clearly did not like the
::::: feeling. I have experienced it before, and it's not a very good
::::: feeling.
:::
::: You can store about 2000 kcals of glycogen in your muscles, so it is
::: possible to ride a good long way and hard before bonking. However,
::: it really does depend on your daily diet and the type of activity
::: you do. A good carby meal the night before can prevent bonking
::: provided you don't ride too hard for too long. Intensity and
::: duration both play a part in the equation. Ride easy and you're
::: tend not to use much glycogen (and you can go longer without
::: bonking). Ride hard and you use more (which brings on the bonk
::: quicker). Ride easy and you tend to use more fat for fuel. Ride
::: hard and you tend to use less fat for fuel. The body sort of has a
::: sliding scale - hard -- glycogen, easy -- fat, while engaged in
::: exercise.
:::
::: Eating something carby during your ride can help, too. That Gu
::: stuff comes to mind.
:::
:::
:::::
::::: Ken
::::: --
::::: The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it
::::: gets old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one
::::: without shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
:::
:::
::
:: Well I guess without a medical exam by a medical professional, its
:: hard to say exactly what the feeling was, but in my experience, I
:: don't ride very well on an empty stomach, although thats not quite
:: true, as 16mph average on that route is one of my fastest recorded
:: times for that ride. But it was a nasty sort of feeling when I got
:: home, and was definitely glad when I had my protein shake and the
:: morning bagel.
::

I would guess that perhaps you were drained in terms of your glycogen
stores, but you know your typical diet better than anyone. Fasting or
undereating for a few days or heavy exercise during the preceeding days
while not eating many carbs might have left you somewhat depleted. Who
knows for sure. Certainly, a carb hit prior to riding will give you more
go-juice!

I follow a low-carb diet during the week (I'm a type 2 diabetic) in winter
and always must have some carbs before, during, and after a ride (and my
rides almost always have some hard parts (hills & going fast on flats) and
some easy parts) to avoid the bonk. A piece of meat just won't work.

I find if I don't eat anything prior or during the ride, then I'm good for
about 30 miles before bonking. So if I'm not home before that point, I'll
bonk on the bike and getting home because a real struggle.


 




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