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Going to be my latest purchase.



 
 
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  #11  
Old October 10th 11, 02:38 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc
James[_8_]
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Posts: 5,739
Default Going to be my latest purchase.

(PeteCresswell) wrote:
Per Harry Brogan:
suggestions as to what additions might be needed.


I like sound of the flip-flop dropouts.

"Needed" is probably the wrong word, but once you start riding it
maybe think about handlebar extensions - the ones that curve
inwards. I mount mine canted slightly downwards and wrapped
with handlebar tape/

I find a number of comfortable hand positions with them. Not
quite as comfortable as riding on hoods but close enough and with
more variety.

They are also convenient for climbing hills out of the saddle or
going a little aero into a wind.


Someday someone will have a bright idea to make flat bar extensions that
turn them into drop bars ;-)

--
JS.
Ads
  #12  
Old October 10th 11, 02:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc
kolldata
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Posts: 2,836
Default Going to be my latest purchase.

BRING IT BY FOR A TRYOUT ! WE CAN GO TO WAL, I'LL BUY.
  #13  
Old October 10th 11, 02:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc
James[_8_]
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Posts: 5,739
Default Going to be my latest purchase.

landotter wrote:
On Oct 9, 4:08 pm, James wrote:
Harry Brogan wrote:
I'll be heading down to pick bike up the first of the week. I was
wondering if anyone out there had any experience with this ride or if
some people had any suggestions as to what additions might be needed.
I mean suggestions besides the usual lighting and safety suggestions.
THANKS GUYS!!!!! ((and Gals))
http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes.../transport/tra...

Lights, if you want to ride at night or in poor weather.

Pump, tool kit, spare inner tubes and/or puncture repair kit.

I like shoes designed for riding, so clipless pedals. Probably double
sided SPD, or SPD one side and platform the other. It's a personal
preference decision.

Again with the personal preference, I'd want handle bars that offer
various hand positions. Drop bars are the ticket. Fitting the controls
from that bike to drop bars might prove a challenge.


Trekking bars offer tons of hand positions and use strong and
inexpensive mtb components. Using drop bars on utility bikes is a
strange affectation.


BTW, dropbars on a MTB is not strange to everyone..

http://twentynineinches.com/2010/05/...-and-concerns/

And what is a "utility bike"? Something to do the shopping with?
Carrying stuff on racks? A touring bike is not much different, yet
those in the touring club I used to ride with all used dropbars.

--
JS.
  #14  
Old October 10th 11, 02:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc
AMuzi
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Posts: 9,554
Default Going to be my latest purchase.

James wrote:
(PeteCresswell) wrote:
Per Harry Brogan:
suggestions as to what additions might be needed.


I like sound of the flip-flop dropouts.

"Needed" is probably the wrong word, but once you start riding it
maybe think about handlebar extensions - the ones that curve
inwards. I mount mine canted slightly downwards and wrapped
with handlebar tape/

I find a number of comfortable hand positions with them. Not
quite as comfortable as riding on hoods but close enough and with
more variety.

They are also convenient for climbing hills out of the saddle or
going a little aero into a wind.


Someday someone will have a bright idea to make flat bar extensions that
turn them into drop bars ;-)


that is so 1994:
http://www.kinetics.org.uk/assets/im...3_07_small.jpg

Product was called 'Newk Bar'

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
  #15  
Old October 10th 11, 03:14 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc
landotter
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Posts: 6,312
Default Going to be my latest purchase.

On Oct 9, 8:21*pm, James wrote:
landotter wrote:
On Oct 9, 4:08 pm, James wrote:
Harry Brogan wrote:
I'll be heading down to pick bike up the first of the week. *I was
wondering if anyone out there had any experience with this ride or if
some people had any suggestions as to what additions might be needed.
I mean suggestions besides the usual lighting and safety suggestions.
THANKS GUYS!!!!! *((and Gals))
http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes.../transport/tra....
Lights, if you want to ride at night or in poor weather.


Pump, tool kit, spare inner tubes and/or puncture repair kit.


I like shoes designed for riding, so clipless pedals. *Probably double
sided SPD, or SPD one side and platform the other. *It's a personal
preference decision.


Again with the personal preference, I'd want handle bars that offer
various hand positions. *Drop bars are the ticket. *Fitting the controls
from that bike to drop bars might prove a challenge.


Trekking bars offer tons of hand positions


Please define "tons".

Seems the Cyclocross folks do plenty of trekking with bikes equipped
with drop bars too.

and use strong and
inexpensive mtb components.


True, however I've not broken a STI lever yet.

Using drop bars on utility bikes is a
strange affectation.


Maybe. *I like to think outside the box and it does not mean the
suggestion I made may not be useful and worth considering.


It's fairly useless. Drops on a longtail are dumb as hell, as you need
the leverage of a wide bar. Plus, the conversion would cost several
hundred dollars. Trekking bars are twenty bucks.
  #16  
Old October 10th 11, 03:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc
kolldata
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,836
Default Going to be my latest purchase.

On Oct 9, 6:08*pm, "(PeteCresswell)" wrote:
Per Harry Brogan:

http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes.../transport/tra...


Cute little blurb in the upper right of "Fit & Sizing": *"The
right fit is everything.".... accompanied by two sizes "M" and
"L"....

The three biggest lies:

- The check is in the mail

- I promise not to come

- One size fits all
--
PeteCresswell


"yeah stop by, we have it in three colors."
  #17  
Old October 10th 11, 04:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc
kolldata
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Posts: 2,836
Default Going to be my latest purchase.

On Oct 9, 7:14*pm, landotter wrote:
On Oct 9, 8:21*pm, James wrote:





landotter wrote:
On Oct 9, 4:08 pm, James wrote:
Harry Brogan wrote:
I'll be heading down to pick bike up the first of the week. *I was
wondering if anyone out there had any experience with this ride or if
some people had any suggestions as to what additions might be needed.
I mean suggestions besides the usual lighting and safety suggestions.
THANKS GUYS!!!!! *((and Gals))
http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes.../transport/tra...
Lights, if you want to ride at night or in poor weather.


Pump, tool kit, spare inner tubes and/or puncture repair kit.


I like shoes designed for riding, so clipless pedals. *Probably double
sided SPD, or SPD one side and platform the other. *It's a personal
preference decision.


Again with the personal preference, I'd want handle bars that offer
various hand positions. *Drop bars are the ticket. *Fitting the controls
from that bike to drop bars might prove a challenge.


Trekking bars offer tons of hand positions


Please define "tons".


Seems the Cyclocross folks do plenty of trekking with bikes equipped
with drop bars too.


and use strong and
inexpensive mtb components.


True, however I've not broken a STI lever yet.


Using drop bars on utility bikes is a
strange affectation.


Maybe. *I like to think outside the box and it does not mean the
suggestion I made may not be useful and worth considering.


It's fairly useless. Drops on a longtail are dumb as hell, as you need
the leverage of a wide bar. Plus, *the conversion would cost several
hundred dollars. Trekking bars are twenty bucks.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


well, driving forward power using a drop/trek or using a moustache
bar....get bboth then sort it out as well as TP, tire sizes. On
Florida's flat roads, drop power worked well with a 100 pound load F/R
but staright clear paved bikepaths. If yaggotta slalom a moustache
bar goes with the outfit. Get a BUM outfit or a dress with straw hat ?
Great Halloween bike.
  #18  
Old October 10th 11, 04:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc
James[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,739
Default Going to be my latest purchase.

landotter wrote:
On Oct 9, 8:21 pm, James wrote:
landotter wrote:
On Oct 9, 4:08 pm, James wrote:
Harry Brogan wrote:
I'll be heading down to pick bike up the first of the week. I was
wondering if anyone out there had any experience with this ride or if
some people had any suggestions as to what additions might be needed.
I mean suggestions besides the usual lighting and safety suggestions.
THANKS GUYS!!!!! ((and Gals))
http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes.../transport/tra...
Lights, if you want to ride at night or in poor weather.
Pump, tool kit, spare inner tubes and/or puncture repair kit.
I like shoes designed for riding, so clipless pedals. Probably double
sided SPD, or SPD one side and platform the other. It's a personal
preference decision.
Again with the personal preference, I'd want handle bars that offer
various hand positions. Drop bars are the ticket. Fitting the controls
from that bike to drop bars might prove a challenge.
Trekking bars offer tons of hand positions

Please define "tons".

Seems the Cyclocross folks do plenty of trekking with bikes equipped
with drop bars too.

and use strong and
inexpensive mtb components.

True, however I've not broken a STI lever yet.

Using drop bars on utility bikes is a
strange affectation.

Maybe. I like to think outside the box and it does not mean the
suggestion I made may not be useful and worth considering.


It's fairly useless. Drops on a longtail are dumb as hell, as you need
the leverage of a wide bar.


Please, do tell what you are levering against? Why is this leverage
necessary on a longtail and not a fully loaded touring bike?

Plus, the conversion would cost several
hundred dollars. Trekking bars are twenty bucks.


Yet still do not provide the same grip position on the hoods that I
particularly like.

I said it was a personal consideration. I said it would cost to
convert. You have done nothing to disprove my statement is true.

--
JS.
  #19  
Old October 10th 11, 04:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,322
Default Going to be my latest purchase.

On Oct 9, 7:57*pm, Harry Brogan
wrote:
I yoo have a Planet Bike rear flasher. *Keeps me from getting nailed
when I am out at night and HAVE to ride on the street.


I have two flashers in the go bag-- the Planet Bike and another older
one that is much less bright, for when I ride with a friend (my
routines are pretty limited these days). The PB unit can be blinding
for a follower on a bike (whoops!).

I used to ride in stealth mode at night (ah youth!) and I still rely
on survival habits developed back then. The bright flasher is a good
thing but it's not 3200 lbs of steel g.

And I will definitely post an update within a few days of purchase.
And I am also a bit unsire about the size of the side bag. *It's
SUPPOSED to be able to hold two full bags of groceries, but we'll see.
I am used to bungee cords so this will be a new experience.


As a former touring rider (camping but not survival level), packs that
suit your purpose are one of those "how did I get along without
these?" things in life, and yes, I made the transition at one point.
"Why is that silly-looking bicycle rider carrying only one pack?" is
another one of those things you figure out pretty quick once you do
it. Doesn't make the bike unstable at all g.

The front rack that comes with that bike might be very handy,
especially given a bag or *whatever* (incl. rigid box with a little
padding in the bottom) that you find and fasten on there to fit your
usage. Much safer for carrying glass bottles, for instance, than just
bungee-ing up and hoping for the best. Experience speaks. Waste not,
want not!

I haven't used a disc (yet) myself but it hasn't been all that long
since I saw (or finally noticed) "my" first one on a commuter bike
that the young woman riding it told me her boyfriend set up special
for her. Yes, indeed, I don't know how long those have been OEM on
"road" bikes (as opposed to dirt-purpose bikes) but a big deal for
safety on a "utility" bike.
--D-y
  #20  
Old October 10th 11, 05:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.soc
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: 2,826
Default Going to be my latest purchase.

On Sun, 09 Oct 2011 20:54:36 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

James wrote:


Someday someone will have a bright idea to make flat bar extensions that
turn them into drop bars ;-)


that is so 1994:
http://www.kinetics.org.uk/assets/im...3_07_small.jpg
Product was called 'Newk Bar'


Welcome to about 2008.
http://www.origin-8.com/?page_id=91&short_code=Drop+Ends&cl1=HANDLEBAR+ACC ESSORY
$15 to $30 per pair.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
 




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