A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » General
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #831  
Old September 16th 18, 03:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,137
Default AG: pickup trucks


Once upon a time I happened to mention somewhere on Usenet that
getting rid of one of our two internal-combustion vehicles would
increase our carbon footprint, because we can do car things with the
pickup truck, but we couldn't do truck things with the car.

An anti-truck fanatic told me, with a perfectly-straight face and
absolute sincerity, that adding a trailer to my car would render it
capable of towing trailers.

I drive the truck now and again, but I pulled a trailer a few blocks
exactly once, and I'm never, ever going to tow a trailer on a public
road again. Luckily, my spouse doesn't mind.

I don't drive the truck very often. I fetched a sheet of plywood with
it several years ago, once I fetched bottled water for a church event,
and twice I drove it to Nappanee intending to ride to Bremen. Well,
the second time I drove to Bremen intending to ride to Nappanee.

Didn't make it either time. The first trip went very well at first --
I rode east on a deserted county road to a fabric shop, then returned
to Nappanee. On the return leg I met an Amish man on a pedestrian
accelerator, and we waved to one another. Nothing to do with whatever
that virulent exchange about "waiving" was -- I think that that was
some other newsgroup -- but simply "I observe that another human being
is present."

After putting my thread and bodkin into the truck and buying a bottle
of tea, I headed west toward Bremen.

After the first turn, I stopped to consult my map, and a scrap of
paper fell out. I tried to pick it up without dismounting, lost my
balance, and, being tangled in the bike, landed like a sack of wet
cement. I got so banged up that after I'd made it as far as the bike
shop (and consternated the children left to watch it; since my vehicle
made no noise, they didn't notice that I was there until I was
preparing to leave) I turned back and returned to Martin's.

Whereupon I discovered that I was so sore that I couldn't lift the
bike into the truck. A young man who was passing by noticed my
difficulty and loaded it for me. I was, at least, capable of climbing
into the truck bed to bungee the bike.

In the above incident, the wet-leaves-under-dry-leaves incident, and
the black-ice-on-the-sidewalk incident, I landed on my left hip.
(After stepping on the ice, I re-wrote the scene in _Vorjack_ in which
the title character conceals a crippling injury.) I don't think all
those impacts did my current condition any good.

The second trip was a year or so later; I'd hardly gotten onto US 30
before I realized that my rotator cuff hadn't recovered from driving
to Frankfort and back a few months earlier. It quit hurting when I
quit driving, but it had put me out of the mood to ride in cold damp,
so instead of exploring, I rode in a straight line to a country store
and the same straight line back. The store was not open on that day
of the week, but I found some white cheddar at a store I passed on the
way, and I bought lots of goodies at Rentown, which is where I had
parked. I wish I could go back and get some more coarse-ground almond
butter, but I'm still afraid to drive that far.

For quite a while after that, my range in a car was a fraction of my
range on a bike. I really should drive more often, for the exercise.
We need to stock up on frozen foods, which should be motivation. Last
time I drove to the grocery stores, I went out to 250 East on Wooster
and came back to town on Thirty. Perhaps next time, I should go to
350 East.

Umm . . . I've done that on the bike many times -- usually in the
other direction -- but is the 350 E railroad crossing open to *cars*?
I do remember one time that it wasn't, therefore not being blocked
must be the normal state.

--------------------------------

Tour d'Warsaw today: two farmer's markets, two groceries, the
library, and the dollar store. I skipped the side-trip up Detroit and
ate "rye" rolls and cream cheese in the parking lot of Owen's West.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

Ads
  #832  
Old September 16th 18, 12:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Stephen Harding[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default AG: pickup trucks

On 09/15/2018 10:12 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

Once upon a time I happened to mention somewhere on Usenet that
getting rid of one of our two internal-combustion vehicles would
increase our carbon footprint, because we can do car things with the
pickup truck, but we couldn't do truck things with the car.

An anti-truck fanatic told me, with a perfectly-straight face and
absolute sincerity, that adding a trailer to my car would render it
capable of towing trailers.


Pickup trucks are amazingly useful vehicles.

I've heard the same argument concerning needing only a trailer to match
pickup truck capabilities but they will never match.

You can indeed pull a ton or two in your little Prius via a trailer,
just as you could in a pickup truck, but your suspension won't hold up
like a truck's will and you won't be able to stop as well as a truck
can. You'll also need some additional skills maneuving the trailer
around that aren't quite similar to skill levels required for a truck.

The two modes of transport aren't equivalent.

Most people probably don't need a car either. They could get by with a
motorcycle/scooter/bicycle and a good rain suit, renting a car only when
needed.

We all have gobs of stuff we don't really "need". I'd hate to get to
the point where someone with a "superior" point of view gets to dictate
what we really "need".


SMH
  #833  
Old September 16th 18, 05:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,161
Default AG: pickup trucks

On 9/16/2018 7:53 AM, Stephen Harding wrote:
On 09/15/2018 10:12 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

Once upon a time I happened to mention somewhere on Usenet that
getting rid of one of our two internal-combustion vehicles would
increase our carbon footprint, because we can do car things with the
pickup truck, but we couldn't do truck things with the car.

An anti-truck fanatic told me, with a perfectly-straight face and
absolute sincerity, that adding a trailer to my car would render it
capable of towing trailers.


Pickup trucks are amazingly useful vehicles.

I've heard the same argument concerning needing only a trailer to match
pickup truck capabilities but they will never match.

You can indeed pull a ton or two in your little Prius via a trailer,
just as you could in a pickup truck, but your suspension won't hold up
like a truck's will and you won't be able to stop as well as a truck
can.Â* You'll also need some additional skills maneuving the trailer
around that aren't quite similar to skill levels required for a truck.


I disagree about the car's suspension. If the trailer is properly
designed and loaded, the car carries maybe 100 pounds hitch load. The
suspension effect is about the same as one extra passenger. Almost all
the trailer's load is borne by the trailer's suspension, not the car's.

You're correct that the car+trailer won't stop quite as well. If that's
a real worry, one can get a trailer with its own brakes. But I've driven
tens of thousands of miles in small cars pulling brakeless trailers with
no braking problems. Reasonable caution is all that's required.

I agree that more skills are required, but that's almost entirely when
backing up. It's easy to remember not to cut corners too sharply.

The two modes of transport aren't equivalent.


I agree. The car+trailer option is less expensive, gets better gas
mileage, emits less pollution, doesn't produce big blind spots for other
drivers, doesn't have headlights at a blinding height, etc. etc.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #834  
Old September 17th 18, 03:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Stephen Harding[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default AG: pickup trucks

On 9/16/2018 12:09 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/16/2018 7:53 AM, Stephen Harding wrote:
On 09/15/2018 10:12 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

Once upon a time I happened to mention somewhere on Usenet that
getting rid of one of our two internal-combustion vehicles would
increase our carbon footprint, because we can do car things with the
pickup truck, but we couldn't do truck things with the car.

An anti-truck fanatic told me, with a perfectly-straight face and
absolute sincerity, that adding a trailer to my car would render it
capable of towing trailers.


Pickup trucks are amazingly useful vehicles.

I've heard the same argument concerning needing only a trailer to
match pickup truck capabilities but they will never match.

You can indeed pull a ton or two in your little Prius via a trailer,
just as you could in a pickup truck, but your suspension won't hold up
like a truck's will and you won't be able to stop as well as a truck
can. You'll also need some additional skills maneuving the trailer
around that aren't quite similar to skill levels required for a truck.


I disagree about the car's suspension. If the trailer is properly
designed and loaded, the car carries maybe 100 pounds hitch load. The
suspension effect is about the same as one extra passenger. Almost all
the trailer's load is borne by the trailer's suspension, not the car's.

You're correct that the car+trailer won't stop quite as well. If that's
a real worry, one can get a trailer with its own brakes. But I've driven
tens of thousands of miles in small cars pulling brakeless trailers with
no braking problems. Reasonable caution is all that's required.

I agree that more skills are required, but that's almost entirely when
backing up. It's easy to remember not to cut corners too sharply.

The two modes of transport aren't equivalent.


I agree. The car+trailer option is less expensive, gets better gas
mileage, emits less pollution, doesn't produce big blind spots for other
drivers, doesn't have headlights at a blinding height, etc. etc.


Trailer tongue weights typically fall in the 100-300 pound range,
depending on trailer size and less trailer loading (assuming "proper"
loading).

The problem is this extra weight is at the tail end of the car. A load
distributing hitch will help, but it does put strains on suspension
elements. An additional person in the vehicle isn't quite the same
since placement is between axles. Unibody cars don't have the
ruggedness of a ladder frame like a pickup truck.

But truck versus car/trailer options largely depends on just how much
hauling one is going to do. Occasional hauls are probably better done
with a trailer option but more frequent hauling better with a pickup.

The trailer also becomes one more thing to stash in your parking area if
your frequency of use is enough to justify ownership over rental.

Get the best tool for the job and use frequency. For me, this has been
single vehicle ownership of a pickup truck to handle the full range of
my motor vehicle needs.


SMH

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Speeding cyclist mows down elderly jogger Mrcheerful UK 10 February 13th 14 10:43 PM
Cyclist:0 Disabled granny:1 Mrcheerful[_3_] UK 1 June 13th 13 09:15 PM
Hit & run cyclist injures elderly woman on pavement John Benn UK 25 August 19th 12 09:33 AM
cyclist says injured granny should not be on pavement! Mrcheerful[_2_] UK 5 June 13th 10 07:37 PM
Cyclist hits granny in pavement crash in Brighton [email protected] UK 167 February 1st 09 10:44 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2018 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.