A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old February 3rd 06, 08:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.marketplace,rec.bicycles.misc,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?

Hi, All:

Thanks for turning me onto this latest must-have item! =) So that
Schwalbe Marathon Plus sounds like the thing to get to avoid
punctures...but how heavy is "heavy," really?

And what about airless tires? What are they, how do they work?


TIA!!

Ads
  #2  
Old February 3rd 06, 09:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.marketplace,rec.bicycles.misc,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?

On 3 Feb 2006 12:22:41 -0800, "NYC XYZ"
wrote:

And what about airless tires? What are they, how do they work?


They are semi-solid constructs, sometimes using a conventional tube
with a foam doughnut in place of the tube, and sometimes made as a
unit with the foam center molded in place within the tire shell.
While they are often regarded as a good thing on wheelchairs and other
low-speed devoces which require a minimal-maintenance service
situation, they have far higher rolling resistance than most
conventional tires (even the puncture-resistant ones fare better from
what I've heard) and they ride very rough; like running a conventional
tire severely over rated pressure.

Some recreational and commuter cyclists like them. No competitive and
few enthusiast cyclists feel that the penalties justify the expense,
inefficiency, and difficulty of installation.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
  #3  
Old February 3rd 06, 09:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.marketplace,rec.bicycles.misc,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?

In the past 4 years, I have ridden on average, 2,000 miles per year. I
have had one puncture flat in that time.

What do I ride? Tubulars (aka sew-ups). Half were standard butyl
tubed, the others TUFO vulcanized tublesss tubulars.

"Impossible!" is what I hear all the time. But if you know how to use
tubulars, they are far better in this respect.

Clinchers are prone to flatting. The stiffness of the construction
encourages puncture rather than deformation. The tube is prone to
pinch flats. And no, this is not because of "faulty installation." It
is the "snakebite" phenomenon--which happens to mountainbikers even
more frequently. At some point, you will bottom out to the rim flange,
and when you do, it is snakebite time. Tubulars don't have that sharp
flange, and so bottoming out never damages anything.

Go ahead and ride your airless bricks. See if you have fun.

The great thing about tubulars is that they are less flat-prone and at
the same time the most fun to ride! (Nothing accelerates, corners or
feels like a good tubular).

And you don't have to deal with trying to get that kevar bead over the
flange in the winter, as you do with clinchers. Tubul;ars are easy to
change--just strip one off and pull the new one on.

Mileage:

rear tires, I get 1,000 miles on a lightweight trainer (Conti Giro) or
TUFO performance type. I gert 2,000 rear wheel miles on the heavier
TUFOS.

front tires, I get over 4,000 miles and have to change them due to
drying out, rather than treadwear.

  #4  
Old February 3rd 06, 10:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.marketplace,rec.bicycles.misc,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?

Maybe if you have constant flats; I tried some back in the 70s and

(a) they're real bait for screwdriver skin punctures trying to get
them on and off

(b) they don't solve the changing tire problem! The tube wears through
in a little longer than it takes normally (because you don't care about
actually wearing through as much) so you still have to change the
sucker, and that's _hard_, going off and going on.

(c) the increased vibration breaks apart the hub flange at the spoke
holes.

Cheng Shin tires last forever, if you want an alternative, though
they have by far the greatest rolling resistance I've ever run into.

--
Ron Hardin


On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
  #5  
Old February 3rd 06, 10:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.marketplace,rec.bicycles.misc,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?

"NYC XYZ" writes:

Hi, All:

Thanks for turning me onto this latest must-have item! =) So that
Schwalbe Marathon Plus sounds like the thing to get to avoid
punctures...but how heavy is "heavy," really?

And what about airless tires? What are they, how do they work?


They ride like they have 200 psi in them, and they roll like they have
40 psi in them. In other words, the worst of both worlds. They won't
go flat but you'll also not enjoy riding your bike...
  #6  
Old February 3rd 06, 10:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.marketplace,rec.bicycles.misc,alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?

"bill" writes:

In the past 4 years, I have ridden on average, 2,000 miles per year.
I have had one puncture flat in that time.


8,000 miles and "one puncture flat." Have you had other types of
flats?

What do I ride? Tubulars (aka sew-ups). Half were standard butyl
tubed, the others TUFO vulcanized tublesss tubulars.

"Impossible!" is what I hear all the time. But if you know how to
use tubulars, they are far better in this respect.

Clinchers are prone to flatting. The stiffness of the construction
encourages puncture rather than deformation.


Malarkey. Pure and simple. Those who have ridden both know that you
are either making this up or thoroughly confused. There are lots of
clinchers available with casings every bit as supple as tubulars.
Hell, most tubulars are nowhere near as supple as the old Setas but
people talk about them like all tubulars are like those old silks.

The tube is prone to pinch flats. And no, this is not because of
"faulty installation." It is the "snakebite" phenomenon--which
happens to mountainbikers even more frequently. At some point, you
will bottom out to the rim flange, and when you do, it is snakebite
time.


Fairly true. Although I can't recall a pinch flat on my clinchers in
quite a while, a couple of years maybe.

Tubulars don't have that sharp flange, and so bottoming out
never damages anything.


Malarkey again.

Go ahead and ride your airless bricks. See if you have fun.

The great thing about tubulars is that they are less flat-prone and
at the same time the most fun to ride! (Nothing accelerates, corners
or feels like a good tubular).


A double dose of you-know-what here.

And you don't have to deal with trying to get that kevar bead over
the flange in the winter, as you do with clinchers. Tubul;ars are
easy to change--just strip one off and pull the new one on.


I can change the tube out of a clincher faster than I can replace a
tubular.

Mileage:

rear tires, I get 1,000 miles on a lightweight trainer (Conti Giro)
or TUFO performance type. I gert 2,000 rear wheel miles on the
heavier TUFOS.


Wow. I'd be really ****ed off if I only got 1000 miles on a rear tire
before it wore out.

front tires, I get over 4,000 miles and have to change them due to
drying out, rather than treadwear.


Rotating your tires correctly prevents this problem. Take the worn
out rear tire off, swap the front tire onto the rear wheel and put the
new tire on the front.
  #7  
Old February 4th 06, 12:17 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?

Tim McNamara wrote:

Rotating your tires correctly prevents this problem. Take the worn
out rear tire off, swap the front tire onto the rear wheel and put the
new tire on the front.


Tim, I don't understand the logic of this. If you are wearing out your
rear tire twice as fast, why put a half used tire on the rear? Would
you not have to replace it twice as quickly as if you put the new tire
on the rear? Not trying to be a wise guy, just trying to understand
what you are saying.

... Although I can't recall a pinch flat on my clinchers in
quite a while, a couple of years maybe.


Agree with you completely. I can't imagine ever having a pinch flat on
a properly inflated road tire unless I somehow manage to hit a pot hole
or am unable to avoid running over a foreign object.
  #8  
Old February 4th 06, 01:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?

catzz66 writes:

Tim McNamara wrote:
Rotating your tires correctly prevents this problem. Take the worn
out rear tire off, swap the front tire onto the rear wheel and put
the new tire on the front.


Tim, I don't understand the logic of this. If you are wearing out
your rear tire twice as fast, why put a half used tire on the rear?
Would you not have to replace it twice as quickly as if you put the
new tire on the rear? Not trying to be a wise guy, just trying to
understand what you are saying.


Ah, that's pretty simple. As was pointed out in the post to whch I was
responding, the front tire basically never wears out but eventually
fails from aging- spossibly with a sidewall blowout or something else
catstrophic. By swapping the front tire onto the back and putting the
new rubber up front, you eliminate this problem.
  #9  
Old February 4th 06, 01:43 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?

catzz66 wrote:
Tim McNamara wrote:


Rotating your tires correctly prevents this problem. Take the worn
out rear tire off, swap the front tire onto the rear wheel and put the
new tire on the front.




Tim, I don't understand the logic of this. If you are wearing out your
rear tire twice as fast, why put a half used tire on the rear? Would
you not have to replace it twice as quickly as if you put the new tire
on the rear? Not trying to be a wise guy, just trying to understand
what you are saying.



Big reason, if your rear tire blows out, your back wheel will stop, and
your bike will drag it's butt, until you stop. If your front tire blows
out, you front wheel will stop, and you do a OTB face plant. I don't
know given that option, I would rather have the rear one go....

W
  #10  
Old February 4th 06, 02:14 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Airless Tires? And How Heavy Is "Heavy"?


"The Wogster" wrote in message
. ..
catzz66 wrote:
Tim McNamara wrote:


Rotating your tires correctly prevents this problem. Take the worn
out rear tire off, swap the front tire onto the rear wheel and put the
new tire on the front.




Tim, I don't understand the logic of this. If you are wearing out your
rear tire twice as fast, why put a half used tire on the rear? Would
you not have to replace it twice as quickly as if you put the new tire
on the rear? Not trying to be a wise guy, just trying to understand
what you are saying.



Big reason, if your rear tire blows out, your back wheel will stop, and
your bike will drag it's butt, until you stop. If your front tire blows
out, you front wheel will stop, and you do a OTB face plant. I don't
know given that option, I would rather have the rear one go....


I don't know about the road but on mtn bikes front tire traction is much
more important than rear tire traction. If I'm running the same tires front
and rear I always rotate front to rear. Nice new edges on the front knobs
and an almost new tire on the rear. The ratio of rear wear to front wear is
probably a lot higher off-road.

Greg


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.