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Elmer's Rubber Cement is not the vulcanizing kind!



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 29th 09, 03:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech
Nick L Plate
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,114
Default Elmer's Rubber Cement is not the vulcanizing kind!

On 27 Apr, 04:46, DirtRoadie wrote:
On Apr 26, 6:55*pm, wrote:

Michael Press wrote:
Remove a well adhered patch. *You will see no indication of chemical
bond formation.


I find a well adhered patch not removable without heating. *Heating
affects the REMA patch orange rubber more than the tube rubber so they
separate with careful pulling. *I have not cared what remains on the
contact surface (it looks clean to me) before applying a new patch and
allowing it to cure.


I have also removed quite a few patches using a suitable solvent -
toluene and xylene are two that work.
The hard part seems to be getting a patch *edge lifted to gain acces
to the tube/patch interface. Once that is accomplished the rest is
easy using a slow "peeling" technique in conjunction with more solvent
(think "cotton swab"). Even well adhered patches will come off clean
leaving *no sign that there was ever a patch adhered/bonded *there.

Everyone seems to agree on that last detail.


I cannot support this for I have had no desire to remove a well
adhered patch. Why?
Ads
  #2  
Old April 29th 09, 05:22 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech
Nick L Plate
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,114
Default Elmer's Rubber Cement is not the vulcanizing kind!

On 29 Apr, 05:08, wrote:
Trevor Jeffrey wrote:
Remove a well adhered patch. *You will see no indication of
chemical bond formation.
I find a well adhered patch not removable without
heating. *Heating affects the REMA patch orange rubber more than
the tube rubber so they separate with careful pulling. *I have not
cared what remains on the contact surface (it looks clean to me)
before applying a new patch and allowing it to cure.
I have also removed quite a few patches using a suitable solvent -
toluene and xylene are two that work.
The hard part seems to be getting a patch edge lifted to gain
access to the tube/patch interface. *Once that is accomplished the
rest is easy using a slow "peeling" technique in conjunction with
more solvent (think "cotton swab"). *Even well adhered patches will
come off clean leaving no sign that there was ever a patch
adhered/bonded there.
Everyone seems to agree on that last detail.

I cannot support this for I have had no desire to remove a well
adhered patch. *Why?


Assuming the rider followed good patching procedures, but chose to
ride his freshly patched tube whose patch can lift off radially from
the hole, forming the dome I described, without leaking. *Such patches
can become slow leaks but in time become "well adhered", requiring
special means for removal as described.

That is Why!


I'm getting splinters under my nails here.
  #3  
Old April 29th 09, 06:26 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech
jim beam[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 318
Default Elmer's Rubber Cement is not the vulcanizing kind!

wrote:
Trevor Jeffrey wrote:

Remove a well adhered patch. You will see no indication of
chemical bond formation.


I find a well adhered patch not removable without
heating. Heating affects the REMA patch orange rubber more than
the tube rubber so they separate with careful pulling. I have not
cared what remains on the contact surface (it looks clean to me)
before applying a new patch and allowing it to cure.


I have also removed quite a few patches using a suitable solvent -
toluene and xylene are two that work.


The hard part seems to be getting a patch edge lifted to gain
access to the tube/patch interface. Once that is accomplished the
rest is easy using a slow "peeling" technique in conjunction with
more solvent (think "cotton swab"). Even well adhered patches will
come off clean leaving no sign that there was ever a patch
adhered/bonded there.


Everyone seems to agree on that last detail.


I cannot support this for I have had no desire to remove a well
adhered patch. Why?


Assuming the rider followed good patching procedures, but chose to
ride his freshly patched tube whose patch can lift off radially from
the hole, forming the dome I described, without leaking. Such patches
can become slow leaks but in time become "well adhered", requiring
special means for removal as described.

That is Why!


er. jobst, you're contrdicting yourself. one moment you say "the rider
followed good patching procedures", then you say "his freshly patched
tube whose patch can lift off radially from the hole".

if the tube is patched per the manufacturer's procedure, the correct
procedure, patches do not lift. thus, if you experience this problem,
you're not following correct procedure.

did you ever study logic?
  #4  
Old April 30th 09, 02:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc,rec.bicycles.tech
dgk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 827
Default Elmer's Rubber Cement is not the vulcanizing kind!

On Tue, 28 Apr 2009 21:22:28 -0700 (PDT), Nick L Plate
wrote:

On 29 Apr, 05:08, wrote:
Trevor Jeffrey wrote:
Remove a well adhered patch. *You will see no indication of
chemical bond formation.
I find a well adhered patch not removable without
heating. *Heating affects the REMA patch orange rubber more than
the tube rubber so they separate with careful pulling. *I have not
cared what remains on the contact surface (it looks clean to me)
before applying a new patch and allowing it to cure.
I have also removed quite a few patches using a suitable solvent -
toluene and xylene are two that work.
The hard part seems to be getting a patch edge lifted to gain
access to the tube/patch interface. *Once that is accomplished the
rest is easy using a slow "peeling" technique in conjunction with
more solvent (think "cotton swab"). *Even well adhered patches will
come off clean leaving no sign that there was ever a patch
adhered/bonded there.
Everyone seems to agree on that last detail.
I cannot support this for I have had no desire to remove a well
adhered patch. *Why?


Assuming the rider followed good patching procedures, but chose to
ride his freshly patched tube whose patch can lift off radially from
the hole, forming the dome I described, without leaking. *Such patches
can become slow leaks but in time become "well adhered", requiring
special means for removal as described.

That is Why!


I'm getting splinters under my nails here.


I think it's time to buy a new tube.
 




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