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105-year old sets new record



 
 
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  #31  
Old January 9th 17, 03:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH
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Default 105-year old sets new record

Your extremities are sense able ? Pain in big toe is big toe pain ...but knowing where the toe is, is difficult ?

What cures have you tried ?
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  #32  
Old January 9th 17, 06:41 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Phil Lee
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Default 105-year old sets new record

John B. considered Mon, 09 Jan 2017 08:04:20
+0700 the perfect time to write:

On Sun, 8 Jan 2017 16:59:32 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 1/7/2017 12:28 PM, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sat, 07 Jan 2017 09:21:58 -0500, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
Per Tim McNamara:
If I get to my 80s and can still ride a bike, I would consider that a
pretty darned big win. I'm delighted to still be riding in my 50s.

I think your chances are pretty good. I'm in my late 70's and can
barely walk - but riding a bike has not yet become a problem

That's encouraging. I think one of the keys to being able to do those
things in our later years is to start them in our younger years and to
keep doing them. My wife is a backpacker and regularly meets people in
their 70s and 80s who are still backpacking.

Keep riding, Pete!


I recall going to a national bike convention in Indianapolis, sometime
in the 1980s and eating dinner with a gentleman who was 80 years old.
He had ridden his bike, with full touring gear, from Toronto.

I think there's a lot of luck involved. But I'm keeping my fingers crossed!


I'm pretty well convinces that, excepting for traumatic physical
injury, activity during old age is largely a factor of having been
active during the period when one is growing older.


Well, traumatic injury or serious illness, at any rate.

My grandfather who
raised chickens on a commercial basis until he we in his 80's with no
help was also quite happy, well into his late 70's to load a pack
basket and walk 20 miles through the bush to a very remote lake, camp
out for a couple of days, and walk back.

On the other hand, people I've known who's greatest physical effort
consisted of walking to the car in order to drive a mile to the shops
seem to deteriorate rather rapidly.

I've seen some of them hang on for years or even decades, although
heavily and increasingly dependent on others.
The fit ones tend to go downhill fast, once they drop off the fitness
level they are accustomed to maintaining.
My grandfather went from running a minimum of 5 miles every morning,
rain, shine, sleet, snow or fog, to his grave in about 18 months after
breaking his hip badly. We had to buy him a new tent for his 76th
birthday, as his old one had woodworm in the poles, and he was still
regularly hiking the long-distance paths of the UK (having campaigned
for many of them to be opened). No hotels or hostels for him - he
wanted to walk until it was too dark then pitch camp for the night,
and wake at dawn for the next day's hike! He was still fully active
into his 80's, but died at 86.
My mother, at the other extreme (who I don't remember ever doing
anything remotely athletic), enjoyed poor health for around 35 years -
and didn't live as long!
I know which way I'd prefer, and which is better for society, and they
are the same.
  #33  
Old January 9th 17, 03:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
(PeteCresswell)
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Posts: 2,790
Default 105-year old sets new record

Per Phil Lee:
The fit ones tend to go downhill fast, once they drop off the fitness
level they are accustomed to maintaining.
My grandfather went from running a minimum of 5 miles every morning,
rain, shine, sleet, snow or fog, to his grave in about 18 months after
breaking his hip badly.


A book on aging that I read a bunch of years ago described "Normal
Death" as being pretty much that: good functionality right up to a few
months from the end, then rapid deterioration and death.

The book said that it has become more-and-more common and will increase
in frequency as people learn to and are able to take proper care of
themselves.
--
Pete Cresswell
  #34  
Old January 9th 17, 03:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Default 105-year old sets new record

On Monday, January 9, 2017 at 7:01:35 AM UTC-8, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
Per Phil Lee:
The fit ones tend to go downhill fast, once they drop off the fitness
level they are accustomed to maintaining.
My grandfather went from running a minimum of 5 miles every morning,
rain, shine, sleet, snow or fog, to his grave in about 18 months after
breaking his hip badly.


A book on aging that I read a bunch of years ago described "Normal
Death" as being pretty much that: good functionality right up to a few
months from the end, then rapid deterioration and death.

The book said that it has become more-and-more common and will increase
in frequency as people learn to and are able to take proper care of
themselves.


The maximum ages obtained by man has hardly changed since the 1500's. But the average age of death has GREATLY increased. But that won't stop the media from trying to frighten you to death with stories of global warming and Zika.
  #35  
Old January 9th 17, 05:45 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 10,538
Default 105-year old sets new record

On 1/8/2017 7:41 PM, Radey Shouman wrote:
Frank Krygowski writes:

On 1/8/2017 12:37 PM, Andrew Chaplin wrote:
wrote

Pete, I'm given to understand that is isn't the muscles but growth
along the back of the eyeballs that make them a little stiffer. I see
at about 20" and either side I'm fuzzy. But I can pass the driver's eye
test without glasses though I can't read the large signs above the
freeway and either need glasses or to know where I'm going. And no
comments about you know where I'm going as well.

I am astigmatic, which makes things blurry for me, especially close up. I
easily meet the requirements for driving with uncorrrected vision, but my
spectacles reduce strain, so I drive with them on.


I'm a bit myopic, but I'm not required to use glasses for driving. I
have progressive lenses, and it's sometimes nice to get a clearer view
of the instrument panel by using the glasses.

But I've noticed that my night view of the road is significantly
better with the glasses off. It seems at night, anyway, I lose more
vision acuity by glare & reflections with the glasses lenses than I
gain from the slight refractory correction.

BTW, bike content: I'm happy to use the same glasses for riding, as
opposed to special glasses. And as a bonus, my homebrew mirrors clip
onto these glasses. They're tiny enough I stash one in each bike's
bag. No searching for special specs, the funny hat, the mirror that
won't work without it, etc.


So your night vision on the bike is ok with glasses? What's the
difference?


Hard to say. I'd guess a big part is that when riding the bike at
night, I tend to choose streets and roads with less traffic, so less
oncoming glare from headlights.

And the glasses vs no-glasses difference when driving certainly isn't a
make or break thing. I normally take them off for night driving only if
I'm doing a long drive - say, more than half an hour. In the city I
never bother.

I would like to hear some magic for eliminating foggy
glasses and raindrops when riding, but last time the question came up no
good answers were forthcoming.


I'd like that magic too. I don't recall many fog problems (except when
coming into the house after a cold ride), but raindrops on my glasses
are annoying day or night.

My cycling cap's bill is too short to shield the glasses. My usual
solution is to avoid riding in rain. My next solution is to take off my
glasses. That works for me, but it means I lose my rear view mirror.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #36  
Old January 9th 17, 05:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 5,270
Default 105-year old sets new record

On Monday, January 9, 2017 at 12:45:46 PM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/8/2017 7:41 PM, Radey Shouman wrote:
Frank Krygowski writes:

On 1/8/2017 12:37 PM, Andrew Chaplin wrote:
wrote

Pete, I'm given to understand that is isn't the muscles but growth
along the back of the eyeballs that make them a little stiffer. I see
at about 20" and either side I'm fuzzy. But I can pass the driver's eye
test without glasses though I can't read the large signs above the
freeway and either need glasses or to know where I'm going. And no
comments about you know where I'm going as well.

I am astigmatic, which makes things blurry for me, especially close up. I
easily meet the requirements for driving with uncorrrected vision, but my
spectacles reduce strain, so I drive with them on.

I'm a bit myopic, but I'm not required to use glasses for driving. I
have progressive lenses, and it's sometimes nice to get a clearer view
of the instrument panel by using the glasses.

But I've noticed that my night view of the road is significantly
better with the glasses off. It seems at night, anyway, I lose more
vision acuity by glare & reflections with the glasses lenses than I
gain from the slight refractory correction.

BTW, bike content: I'm happy to use the same glasses for riding, as
opposed to special glasses. And as a bonus, my homebrew mirrors clip
onto these glasses. They're tiny enough I stash one in each bike's
bag. No searching for special specs, the funny hat, the mirror that
won't work without it, etc.


So your night vision on the bike is ok with glasses? What's the
difference?


Hard to say. I'd guess a big part is that when riding the bike at
night, I tend to choose streets and roads with less traffic, so less
oncoming glare from headlights.

And the glasses vs no-glasses difference when driving certainly isn't a
make or break thing. I normally take them off for night driving only if
I'm doing a long drive - say, more than half an hour. In the city I
never bother.

I would like to hear some magic for eliminating foggy
glasses and raindrops when riding, but last time the question came up no
good answers were forthcoming.


I'd like that magic too. I don't recall many fog problems (except when
coming into the house after a cold ride), but raindrops on my glasses
are annoying day or night.

My cycling cap's bill is too short to shield the glasses. My usual
solution is to avoid riding in rain. My next solution is to take off my
glasses. That works for me, but it means I lose my rear view mirror.

--
- Frank Krygowski


Try anti-dimming/fogging compound used bt the military for gas masks.

Cheers
  #37  
Old January 9th 17, 06:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
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Posts: 1,424
Default 105-year old sets new record

On Saturday, January 7, 2017 at 9:28:54 AM UTC-8, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sat, 07 Jan 2017 09:21:58 -0500, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
Per Tim McNamara:
If I get to my 80s and can still ride a bike, I would consider that a
pretty darned big win. I'm delighted to still be riding in my 50s.


I think your chances are pretty good. I'm in my late 70's and can
barely walk - but riding a bike has not yet become a problem


That's encouraging. I think one of the keys to being able to do those
things in our later years is to start them in our younger years and to
keep doing them. My wife is a backpacker and regularly meets people in
their 70s and 80s who are still backpacking.

Keep riding, Pete!


I hope they bring one of these
https://www.rei.com/product/846402/alite-monarch-butterfly-chair?CAWELAID=120217890000811519&CAGPSPN=pla&CAAG ID=15725087320&CATCI=pla-126976956280&cm_mmc=PLA_Google|404_9823|8464020002 |none|04a902ef-6c0a-410a-ac71-05f8b2179b11|pla-126976956280&lsft=cm_mmc:PLA_Google_LIA|404_9823|8 464020002|none|04a902ef-6c0a-410a-ac71-05f8b2179b11|pla-126976956280&gclid=CMHprKLbtdECFQuAfgodCOcIww

Last time I went bike touring, I didn't understand how anyone can get comfortable on an aluminum park bench
  #38  
Old January 9th 17, 09:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 3,345
Default 105-year old sets new record

On Monday, January 9, 2017 at 10:41:46 AM UTC-8, Doug Landau wrote:
On Saturday, January 7, 2017 at 9:28:54 AM UTC-8, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sat, 07 Jan 2017 09:21:58 -0500, (PeteCresswell) wrote:
Per Tim McNamara:
If I get to my 80s and can still ride a bike, I would consider that a
pretty darned big win. I'm delighted to still be riding in my 50s.

I think your chances are pretty good. I'm in my late 70's and can
barely walk - but riding a bike has not yet become a problem


That's encouraging. I think one of the keys to being able to do those
things in our later years is to start them in our younger years and to
keep doing them. My wife is a backpacker and regularly meets people in
their 70s and 80s who are still backpacking.

Keep riding, Pete!


I hope they bring one of these
https://www.rei.com/product/846402/alite-monarch-butterfly-chair?CAWELAID=120217890000811519&CAGPSPN=pla&CAAG ID=15725087320&CATCI=pla-126976956280&cm_mmc=PLA_Google|404_9823|8464020002 |none|04a902ef-6c0a-410a-ac71-05f8b2179b11|pla-126976956280&lsft=cm_mmc:PLA_Google_LIA|404_9823|8 464020002|none|04a902ef-6c0a-410a-ac71-05f8b2179b11|pla-126976956280&gclid=CMHprKLbtdECFQuAfgodCOcIww

Last time I went bike touring, I didn't understand how anyone can get comfortable on an aluminum park bench


It must be your deeply seated fear of being too shallow seated?
  #39  
Old January 10th 17, 08:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_6_]
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Posts: 2,202
Default 105-year old sets new record

On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 10:01:27 -0500, "(PeteCresswell)"
wrote:

Per Phil Lee:
The fit ones tend to go downhill fast, once they drop off the fitness
level they are accustomed to maintaining.
My grandfather went from running a minimum of 5 miles every morning,
rain, shine, sleet, snow or fog, to his grave in about 18 months after
breaking his hip badly.


A book on aging that I read a bunch of years ago described "Normal
Death" as being pretty much that: good functionality right up to a few
months from the end, then rapid deterioration and death.

The book said that it has become more-and-more common and will increase
in frequency as people learn to and are able to take proper care of
themselves.


both my grandfathers died that way. Got up in the morning, ate a good
lunch, laid down for a bit of a nap after lunch and never woke up.

I'm not eager to join them but it is probably as good a way to go as
any.
--
cheers,

John B.

  #40  
Old January 10th 17, 02:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
(PeteCresswell)
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Posts: 2,790
Default 105-year old sets new record

Per John B.:
both my grandfathers died that way. Got up in the morning, ate a good
lunch, laid down for a bit of a nap after lunch and never woke up.

I'm not eager to join them but it is probably as good a way to go as
any.


My daughter's German uncle died about as well as I can imagine. Early
nineties, similar scenario: drank one last beer, closed his eyes, and
the lights went out for good.
--
Pete Cresswell
 




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