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58% of California is in Heavy Drought.



 
 
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  #41  
Old January 10th 17, 12:19 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Monday, January 9, 2017 at 2:30:50 PM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:

Saw this in Science News;

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...n-wolf-species

DNA says coyotes/wolves overlap quite a bit now.


Andrew, these are called hybrids and they don't occur normally nor in high numbers. In Yellowstone wolves kill coyotes, they don't just chase them away like they do elsewhere.

Hybridization 98% of the time causes less fitter specimens. This is why we have wolves and coyotes as separate species in the first place.

There are no magic words to DNA. Wolves and coyotes certainly overlapped after all they have the same ancestors. But the ways that you tell when DNA differences occurred is extremely roundabout. I have not seen a DNA analysis that actually made a study beyond saying that this coyote has DNA from a wolf in it and that one doesn't and that somehow sets a time period. It doesn't because the absence of the wolf DNA can be the evolution and not a hybridization in the opposite direction.

Regardless of Doug's chanting that was not a wolf. It was very large, ran WAY too far and too fast. Within my eyesight it ran full speed for over a mile before getting out of sight. Scavengers like coyotes do not have running stamina.

And those pictures that you're showing are from zoo animals. They are far too well fed. So similarities in appearances aren't as they look in the wild.. In fact http://tinyurl.com/jog39fh
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  #42  
Old January 10th 17, 12:33 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
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Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Monday, January 9, 2017 at 4:19:22 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, January 9, 2017 at 2:30:50 PM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:

Saw this in Science News;

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...n-wolf-species

DNA says coyotes/wolves overlap quite a bit now.


Andrew, these are called hybrids and they don't occur normally nor in high numbers. In Yellowstone wolves kill coyotes, they don't just chase them away like they do elsewhere.

Hybridization 98% of the time causes less fitter specimens. This is why we have wolves and coyotes as separate species in the first place.

There are no magic words to DNA. Wolves and coyotes certainly overlapped after all they have the same ancestors. But the ways that you tell when DNA differences occurred is extremely roundabout. I have not seen a DNA analysis that actually made a study beyond saying that this coyote has DNA from a wolf in it and that one doesn't and that somehow sets a time period. It doesn't because the absence of the wolf DNA can be the evolution and not a hybridization in the opposite direction.

Regardless of Doug's chanting that was not a wolf. It was very large, ran WAY too far and too fast. Within my eyesight it ran full speed for over a mile before getting out of sight. Scavengers like coyotes do not have running stamina.

And those pictures that you're showing are from zoo animals. They are far too well fed. So similarities in appearances aren't as they look in the wild. In fact http://tinyurl.com/jog39fh


Those are some small scrawny ones. The ones that stroll leisurely across our lawn in Los Gatos look much larger, much more well-fed, and generally more like wolves than the ones in these pix.

https://www.google.com/search?q=big+...XO6YOCNA2UM%3A

  #43  
Old January 10th 17, 12:45 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On 1/9/2017 6:19 PM, wrote:
On Monday, January 9, 2017 at 2:30:50 PM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:

Saw this in Science News;

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...n-wolf-species

DNA says coyotes/wolves overlap quite a bit now.


Andrew, these are called hybrids and they don't occur normally nor in high numbers. In Yellowstone wolves kill coyotes, they don't just chase them away like they do elsewhere.

Hybridization 98% of the time causes less fitter specimens. This is why we have wolves and coyotes as separate species in the first place.

There are no magic words to DNA. Wolves and coyotes certainly overlapped after all they have the same ancestors. But the ways that you tell when DNA differences occurred is extremely roundabout. I have not seen a DNA analysis that actually made a study beyond saying that this coyote has DNA from a wolf in it and that one doesn't and that somehow sets a time period. It doesn't because the absence of the wolf DNA can be the evolution and not a hybridization in the opposite direction.

Regardless of Doug's chanting that was not a wolf. It was very large, ran WAY too far and too fast. Within my eyesight it ran full speed for over a mile before getting out of sight. Scavengers like coyotes do not have running stamina.

And those pictures that you're showing are from zoo animals. They are far too well fed. So similarities in appearances aren't as they look in the wild. In fact http://tinyurl.com/jog39fh


Thank you.

I am not an expert. I read across a variety of areas and
sorta half remember things once in a while. When this
discussion turned to taxonomy of wolves versus coyotes, I
remembered reading that article. Aside from the stock images
shown, the actual research was intriguing.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #44  
Old January 10th 17, 01:03 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
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Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Sun, 08 Jan 2017 15:01:47 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:
On Sun, 8 Jan 2017 13:59:33 -0800 (PST), wrote:

But the entire state is on a flood watch.


The recent rains might help with reservoirs and surface water, but it
will take years to recharge the aquifier and return water table levels
to normal:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx?CA


Yep, drought is more than simple rainfall or lack thereof. And in
California water is an enormous issue due to both the large population
and intensive agriculture. The aquifers are critical to food
production, livability and property values. A house with no water is
not going to sell for very much, after all.

This is from 3 years ago, but is still generally valid: "NASA
Analysis: 11 Trillion Gallons to Replenish California Drought Losses"
https://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/december/nasa-analysis-11-trillion-gallons-to-replenish-california-drought-losses/

Meanwhile, this is from only 4 days ago: "California eyes treated
wastewater for human consumption"
http://www.sonomanews.com/news/6506804-181/california-eyes-treated-wastewater-for


Well, ultimately all or nearly all of our water is recycled wastewater.

Since I saw a wolf on Mt. Hamilton and all called me a liar since
there are no wolves in California they have a bit of egg on their
faces discovering that there have been wolves spotted in several other
places in California.


There have been wolves in California for many years:
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/jeffl/jeffl-wolf.gif
It's just that us werewolves have a public relations problem and
prefer to maintain a low profile. Pretending that we're extinct is a
good defensive measure. Please keep your wolf siting to yourself.


LOL! A wolf on Mt. Hamilton? I've never been there so I can't refute
or confirm, but individual wolves are known to travel very long
distances. One female traveled from far northern Minnesota to the
suburbs of Minneapolis-St. Paul and back a few years ago. And of course
many people will spot a coyote and think they've seen a wolf (in the
eastern US, they might be seeing a coyote-eastern wolf hybrid).

  #45  
Old January 10th 17, 01:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH
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Posts: 2,011
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

BS

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/c...he_west_coast/



  #46  
Old January 10th 17, 02:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 3,345
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Monday, January 9, 2017 at 5:03:31 PM UTC-8, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sun, 08 Jan 2017 15:01:47 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:
On Sun, 8 Jan 2017 13:59:33 -0800 (PST), wrote:

But the entire state is on a flood watch.


The recent rains might help with reservoirs and surface water, but it
will take years to recharge the aquifier and return water table levels
to normal:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx?CA


Yep, drought is more than simple rainfall or lack thereof. And in
California water is an enormous issue due to both the large population
and intensive agriculture. The aquifers are critical to food
production, livability and property values. A house with no water is
not going to sell for very much, after all.

This is from 3 years ago, but is still generally valid: "NASA
Analysis: 11 Trillion Gallons to Replenish California Drought Losses"
https://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/december/nasa-analysis-11-trillion-gallons-to-replenish-california-drought-losses/

Meanwhile, this is from only 4 days ago: "California eyes treated
wastewater for human consumption"
http://www.sonomanews.com/news/6506804-181/california-eyes-treated-wastewater-for


Well, ultimately all or nearly all of our water is recycled wastewater.

Since I saw a wolf on Mt. Hamilton and all called me a liar since
there are no wolves in California they have a bit of egg on their
faces discovering that there have been wolves spotted in several other
places in California.


There have been wolves in California for many years:
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/jeffl/jeffl-wolf.gif
It's just that us werewolves have a public relations problem and
prefer to maintain a low profile. Pretending that we're extinct is a
good defensive measure. Please keep your wolf siting to yourself.


LOL! A wolf on Mt. Hamilton? I've never been there so I can't refute
or confirm, but individual wolves are known to travel very long
distances. One female traveled from far northern Minnesota to the
suburbs of Minneapolis-St. Paul and back a few years ago. And of course
many people will spot a coyote and think they've seen a wolf (in the
eastern US, they might be seeing a coyote-eastern wolf hybrid).


Tim, the aquifer map I showed you demonstrates beyond the shadow of a doubt that it is both difficult and expensive to pump water out of a well.

I have a cousin with a 40 acre plot in Tracy and used to have another with what I remember as a 40 acre Walnut Orchard but my older brother remembers as a tomato farm with Walnut trees around it in the Santa Clara Valley along what is now El Camino Real. Neither of these people used well water for large farms. (Though I distinctly remember harvesting walnuts with a tree shaker and there was another machine that would separate the good ones from the bad and also get rid of all the leaves and sticks that fell out when the shaker was shaking the tree. It looked like an inclined conveyer belt with a shelf on it. It was similar to a gold mining machine. Good walnuts are much heavier than the bad ones so at a particular speed and shake rate all of the light detritus would keep falling down while the heavy walnuts would catch in shelves on the conveyer belt and be shifted over the top into wooden boxes for shipping.)

With a water table at 200 feet the rivers and the plumbing systems run by the counties are MUCH cheaper.

You don't think that you turn on the water and it runs like out of a hose do you? When you pump water you draw off all of the immediate water and the rest has to percolate into that well area. There are ways of drilling these wells so that they have a fairly large reservoir at the bottom for water to seep into when you aren't pumping but you are STILL limited by percolation rates of the soil.
  #47  
Old January 10th 17, 07:02 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
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Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Mon, 9 Jan 2017 10:25:16 -0800 (PST), Doug Landau
wrote:

There have been wolves in California for many years:
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/jeffl/jeffl-wolf.gif


You weren't doin that the day I met you


I only do that on the night of the full moon. I might consider
inviting you to watch the transformation, but I might be tempted to
devour you. Too much of a risk methinks.

Some of my werewolf stories from about 1997:
http://members.cruzio.com/~jeffl/nooze/werewolf.txt

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #48  
Old January 10th 17, 12:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH
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Posts: 2,011
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

So, Mr. Liebermann you're illness is not recent ?
  #49  
Old January 10th 17, 03:37 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Sunday, January 8, 2017 at 1:59:35 PM UTC-8, wrote:
But the entire state is on a flood watch.

But the riding will undoubtedly be marvelous this spring with new growth everywhere and the old dead growth knocked down by the heavy winds and water soaked root systems.

The hills will be alive with plants and animals everywhere. The bird watchers made a count a week or so ago and I'll be seeing one this coming weekend to see the results among other things.

Since I saw a wolf on Mt. Hamilton and all called me a liar since there are no wolves in California they have a bit of egg on their faces discovering that there have been wolves spotted in several other places in California.. There really are no such things as "lone wolves". These are very temporary. The Alpha Male or head wolf will evict the male pups from the pack after a couple of years when they get large enough to be a possible threat to his dominance. So seeing one wolf insures that many others are near.

The rivers even close to the cities are now turning up river otters. Naturalists are sort of confused about them. They only recently (relatively) discovered that sea otters are absolutely necessary to grow the kelp forests that grow the large diversity of sea creatures and other flora that maintain the health of the coastal waters. Now since river otters had disappeared so long ago the reappearance of them gives them pause. They do not understand what part they play in the ecosystem. They are still struggling with beavers as an absolute necessity as well.

If you LOOK while you ride it is amazing the things you can see. Now is only one of these reappearing animals will control the almost uncontrollable Crow and Raven populations.


This morning I looked up the present seasonal rainfall, the normal for this time and the seasonal normal.

The season begins Oct 1, so we are presently a quarter of he way into the yearly measurement.

Northern California has about their seasonal max.
The bay area about one and a half times the season to this date normal.
Central California has between one and a half and twice season to this date normal. Some locations have hit their seasonal max.

It is predicted to rain steadily for the next two days and then we'll have a week's break where I can quickly get some riding in so all of my muscles don't atrophy.
  #50  
Old January 10th 17, 05:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On 1/9/2017 5:30 PM, AMuzi wrote:



Saw this in Science News;

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...n-wolf-species

DNA says coyotes/wolves overlap quite a bit now.


Well, Tom knows DNA, of course.

FWIW: A couple years ago we were in Nova Scotia, and Cape Breton. At
one recreated historic village a blacksmith was forging a sword. When I
asked what he'd use it for, he said probably just a wall hanging unless
he needed it against a coyote-wolf hybrid. He claimed they were getting
common and were much less shy of humans than wolves, and occasionally
much more aggressive.

I filed the report as "Huh, never heard of that; wonder if it's true."

Last week on the PBS program Nova, those animals were part of the
hour-long show. Seems in the east, at least, they originated in
Algonquin National Park, which had an isolated wolf population. When
coyotes recently extended their range into the area, the coyotes and
wolves mated, and they continue to do so.

And the spread of coyotes has been remarkable. They now take young deer
in our forest preserve - a good thing, overall, I think. And with luck,
they may convince people to keep their dogs on leash.


--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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