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Threaded versus threadless headset



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 20th 03, 11:42 AM
Hjalmar Duklæt
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Default Threaded versus threadless headset

Hi,
What's the advantage of a threadless headset over an oldfashioned threaded
one? Is the threaded one stiffer/lighter? Would it improve my riding in any
way going from threaded to threadless?
Hjalmar


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  #2  
Old August 20th 03, 04:59 PM
M Gagnon
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Default Threaded versus threadless headset

"Hjalmar Duklæt" a écrit dans le message de
...
Hi,
What's the advantage of a threadless headset over an oldfashioned threaded
one? Is the threaded one stiffer/lighter? Would it improve my riding in

any
way going from threaded to threadless?
Hjalmar



No difference at all as far as riding is concerned. Differences are in
construction, cost, flexibility and durability.

- With threadless headset, the manufacturer may manufacture a very long for
and cut or (or have it cut by the LBS) to the required length. Less
inventory.

- Threaded is nicer. Highly subjective, but it's more gracious on a nice
road or touring bike.

- Threadless headset is less adjustable. With threaded, one may slide in and
out the quill to raise handlebars; with threadless, you need to move spacers
around (not as nice) or use an adjustable quill, which also change the
reach.

- In theory, threadless is lighter. But if you get a stem with any kind of
adjustability, you forego any weight gain.

- Threadless is easier to fix on the road as you don't need to carry a
cumbersome headset tool.

- With threadless, there is one less joint to crack. So if you hear
handlebar noise, it's easier to find.

- A threadless headset is stronger, but I think it's much more due to the
fact typical threadless is 1 1/8" whereas threaded is 1" in nominal
diametre. The added strength is more important for off-road riding than
on-road riding. Threaded headsets worked for many years on road and touring
without problems, however.

Michel

  #3  
Old August 20th 03, 05:41 PM
Fabrizio Mazzoleni
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Default Threaded versus threadless headset


David L. Johnson wrote in message ...

With a quill stem (that is, with a threaded fork and headset),


Dave, when was the last time you saw anyone
riding with those old things, these days
everyone ride threadless.

And if you do see guys with quill stems on the
next ride then find another group to ride with,
because they are the 'B' group. Those are
probably the same lamers that are running
conventional 32 spoke wheels. Not the types
you want to been seen with!



  #4  
Old August 20th 03, 05:45 PM
Paul Southworth
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Default Threaded versus threadless headset

In article ,
Hjalmar Duklæt wrote:
What's the advantage of a threadless headset over an oldfashioned threaded
one?


* Lighter weight
* Some types of forks easier to find threadless
* Headset can be adjusted with an allen wrench on the road

Disadvantages -

* Some sucky threadless headsets defy proper adjustment
* If you take the stem off you have to readjust the headset

Is the threaded one stiffer/lighter?


The threadless one is usually lighter.

Threadless can be stiffer, although the stiffness difference is
irrelevant to most riders. And if you replace a steel fork with a
carbon one as part of the change, you will lose more stiffness than
you'll gain.

Would it improve my riding in any
way going from threaded to threadless?


The weight reduction is the only appreciable benefit, and you
will find it does not affect your speed by much. But if tinkering
with your bike makes you happy, it may improve your riding.

--Paul
  #5  
Old August 20th 03, 05:49 PM
ajames54
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Default Threaded versus threadless headset

On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 16:41:24 GMT, "Fabrizio Mazzoleni"
wrote:


David L. Johnson wrote in message ...

With a quill stem (that is, with a threaded fork and headset),


Dave, when was the last time you saw anyone
riding with those old things, these days
everyone ride threadless.

And if you do see guys with quill stems on the
next ride then find another group to ride with,
because they are the 'B' group. Those are
probably the same lamers that are running
conventional 32 spoke wheels. Not the types
you want to been seen with!


Is my irony meter is broken? I get mixed readings on this one...
  #6  
Old August 20th 03, 06:01 PM
Paul Southworth
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Default Threaded versus threadless headset

In article ,
David L. Johnson wrote:
Very few new bikes have a
spacer on top of the stem, so adjusting the bars upward is only possible
if flipping the stem over raises the position.


Or if you use a steer tube extender. Which works fine and costs
little but is admittedly hideous. But it's nicer than a quill stem in
the sense that you can add rise to any threadless stem, a lot cheaper
and easier than you can find a replacement quill stem with more rise.
If what you want is proper fit, it works fine.

In the case of someone doing a fresh conversion to threadless however,
this really isn't an issue - just buy the right fork.

--Paul




  #7  
Old August 20th 03, 07:30 PM
Peter Cole
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Default Threaded versus threadless headset

"Hjalmar Duklæt" wrote in message
...
Hi,
What's the advantage of a threadless headset over an oldfashioned threaded
one? Is the threaded one stiffer/lighter? Would it improve my riding in any
way going from threaded to threadless?


The single big advantage of threadless is that they don't corrode themselves
stuck like quill stems (and seat posts).


  #8  
Old August 20th 03, 08:39 PM
Rick Onanian
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Default Threaded versus threadless headset

On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 12:07:00 -0400, David L. Johnson
wrote:
again, every time you mess around with the stem, you have to re-adjust
the bearings.


Care to elaborate? I've adjusted and changes stems
on my threadless-stem road bike a few times, and if
I missed something important, I'd like to know...

Which bearings, and what type of adjustment?

--
Rick Onanian
  #9  
Old August 20th 03, 09:14 PM
Bob M
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Default Threaded versus threadless headset

On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 15:39:02 -0400, Rick Onanian wrote:

On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 12:07:00 -0400, David L. Johnson
wrote:
again, every time you mess around with the stem, you have to re-adjust
the bearings.


Care to elaborate? I've adjusted and changes stems
on my threadless-stem road bike a few times, and if
I missed something important, I'd like to know...

Which bearings, and what type of adjustment?


Basically, you tighten the bolt on the cap until you feel no play in the
headset (which can be done by grabbing the front brakes and pushing the
bike forward). That's the adjustment. On a threaded headset, it's the
same adjustment, only you tighten large nuts that go around the steerer
tube.

--
Bob M in CT
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  #10  
Old August 20th 03, 09:28 PM
David L. Johnson
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Default Threaded versus threadless headset

On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 20:14:14 +0000, Bob M wrote:

On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 15:39:02 -0400, Rick Onanian wrote:

On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 12:07:00 -0400, David L. Johnson
wrote:
again, every time you mess around with the stem, you have to re-adjust
the bearings.


Care to elaborate? I've adjusted and changes stems on my threadless-stem
road bike a few times, and if I missed something important, I'd like to
know...

Which bearings, and what type of adjustment?


Basically, you tighten the bolt on the cap until you feel no play in the
headset (which can be done by grabbing the front brakes and pushing the
bike forward). That's the adjustment. On a threaded headset, it's the
same adjustment, only you tighten large nuts that go around the steerer
tube.


But you only do the adjustment on a threaded headset once. For
threadless, you have to re-do each time you change anything about the
stem. When you remove the stem of a threadless headset, the whole headset
assembly is loose.

Yes, it's simple enough to re-adjust, though I do not like the idea of
trying to adjust the preload if the bearings are not clean and well-lubed.

We have all heard about people who couldn't adjust the preload on their
hubs; I see no reason to presume they could adjust the preload on a
headset, either. For them, raising the bar height means a trip to the
mechanic.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | When you are up to your ass in alligators, it's hard to remember
_`\(,_ | that your initial objective was to drain the swamp. -- LBJ
(_)/ (_) |


 




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