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Buying a used recumbent



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 20th 04, 02:05 AM
John Kimmel
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Default Buying a used recumbent

I'm going to look at a Vision R-40. Can someone give me technical
information on the bike? I'd like to know whether it is adjustable for
riders between 5'6" and 6', the mechanics of adjusting for different
size riders, whether the conversion between LWB and SWB is a major
modification or simply a matter of switching parts around. I'd also like
to know opinions of the bike in general.

Thanks

--
J Kimmel

www.metalinnovations.com

"Cuius testiculos habes, habeas cardia et cerebellum." - When you have
their full attention in your grip, their hearts and minds will follow.
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  #2  
Old December 20th 04, 02:37 AM
Tom Sherman
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Default

John Kimmel wrote:

I'm going to look at a Vision R-40. Can someone give me technical
information on the bike? I'd like to know whether it is adjustable for
riders between 5'6" and 6', the mechanics of adjusting for different
size riders, whether the conversion between LWB and SWB is a major
modification or simply a matter of switching parts around. I'd also like
to know opinions of the bike in general.


ATP Vision is of course out of business, so you are on your own if
anything Vision specific breaks. However, most repairs could be made
and/or parts replaced by a competent frame builder and machinist,
respectively.

The bike will fit the height range you mention. Changing seat to pedal
distance requires adjusting the boom and changing the chain length. The
bolts that secure the boom have an eccentric force applied to them, so
they should be replaced after a few adjustments, unless one enjoys
drilling and tapping to remove broken bolts. Due to these factors, the
Vision 40-series bikes are best suited for use by a single rider.

ATP Vision revised the frame design in 1999, lengthening the wheelbase.
The earlier models are twitchier, and require more attention to balance
and steering when riding. The stock components were also significantly
upgraded in 1999.

The SWB to LWB conversion is reportedly something that can be done by
anyone with basic bicycle mechanic skills in an hour or two.

--
Tom Sherman

  #3  
Old December 20th 04, 08:42 AM
John Kimmel
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Default

Thanks. Looks like it will be worth the drive to look at it.

Tom Sherman wrote:


--
John Kimmel


GET YER STINKING PAWS OFF ME YOU DAMN DIRTY APE!

  #4  
Old December 20th 04, 02:32 PM
skip
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Default


"John Kimmel" wrote in message
...
Thanks. Looks like it will be worth the drive to look at it.

Tom Sherman wrote:


--
John Kimmel


GET YER STINKING PAWS OFF ME YOU DAMN DIRTY APE!


I take it you aren't interested in the used NoCom.

skip


  #5  
Old December 21st 04, 02:13 AM
Tom Sherman
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Default

skip wrote:

"John Kimmel" wrote in message
...

GET YER STINKING PAWS OFF ME YOU DAMN DIRTY APE!



I take it you aren't interested in the used NoCom.


Zoology lesson of the day: Monkeys are not apes.

--
Tom Sherman

  #6  
Old December 21st 04, 02:18 AM
Tom Sherman
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Default

John Kimmel wrote:

Thanks. Looks like it will be worth the drive to look at it.


Understand that unless you are one of the physically gifted people who
learn new athletic skills with ease, you may find the Vision R-40 (and
many other recumbents) hard to ride at first. Patience is required.

The first recumbent I tried to ride was a 1998 Vision R-40. I was not
able to both steer and balance after half an hour or so of trying.
Several months later, after having ridden a RANS Wave for several
hundred miles, I was able to ride the same exact R-40 without
significant difficulty.

--
Tom Sherman

  #7  
Old December 21st 04, 03:18 AM
Edward Dolan
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Default


"Tom Sherman" wrote in message
...
John Kimmel wrote:

Thanks. Looks like it will be worth the drive to look at it.


Understand that unless you are one of the physically gifted people who
learn new athletic skills with ease, you may find the Vision R-40 (and
many other recumbents) hard to ride at first. Patience is required.

The first recumbent I tried to ride was a 1998 Vision R-40. I was not able
to both steer and balance after half an hour or so of trying. Several
months later, after having ridden a RANS Wave for several hundred miles, I
was able to ride the same exact R-40 without significant difficulty.


My God, do you have some physical disability that would cause this? The
Vision is my favorite bike of about 10 recumbents that I have. I will admit
it was not the first recumbent I ever got, but it presented no problems
whatsoever when I first rode it. It is a quick steerer, depending on how you
have it set up, but it takes only a few minutes to get used to. I will admit
it is one of the shorter SWB recumbents, but there are good reasons for that
too.

I am very sorry Vision went out of business as I regard it as having the
most comfortable recumbent seat ever made. It was a stroke of genius how
they designed that seat to be easily adjusted and removed from the frame.

--
Regards,

Ed Dolan - Minnesota


  #8  
Old December 21st 04, 03:35 AM
Tom Sherman
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Default

Edward Dolan wrote:

"Tom Sherman" wrote in message
...

John Kimmel wrote:


Thanks. Looks like it will be worth the drive to look at it.


Understand that unless you are one of the physically gifted people who
learn new athletic skills with ease, you may find the Vision R-40 (and
many other recumbents) hard to ride at first. Patience is required.

The first recumbent I tried to ride was a 1998 Vision R-40. I was not able
to both steer and balance after half an hour or so of trying. Several
months later, after having ridden a RANS Wave for several hundred miles, I
was able to ride the same exact R-40 without significant difficulty.



My God, do you have some physical disability that would cause this? The
Vision is my favorite bike of about 10 recumbents that I have. I will admit
it was not the first recumbent I ever got, but it presented no problems
whatsoever when I first rode it. It is a quick steerer, depending on how you
have it set up, but it takes only a few minutes to get used to. I will admit
it is one of the shorter SWB recumbents, but there are good reasons for that
too.


Read my post again. Note that with some recumbent riding experience I
was able to ride the 1998 R-40 "without significant difficulty".

My gross motor skills are towards the poor end of the normal range.
However, I was able to ride a certain dual ISO 406-mm wheel size
Wishbone RT without problems after an adjustment period. This is a bike
that has given several experienced recumbent riders problems on their
first ride.

I am very sorry Vision went out of business as I regard it as having the
most comfortable recumbent seat ever made. It was a stroke of genius how
they designed that seat to be easily adjusted and removed from the frame.


However, care is required in fastening the seat properly. I recall a
Vision rider going over backwards on startup, as his seat came loose at
the front.

--
Tom Sherman

 




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