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Continental Ultra Sport tires



 
 
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  #21  
Old September 24th 18, 06:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Theodore Heise[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 83
Default Continental Ultra Sport tires

On Sun, 23 Sep 2018 09:47:21 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 9/22/2018 4:56 PM, Theodore Heise wrote:
On Fri, 21 Sep 2018 18:05:17 -0400,
Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/21/2018 2:40 PM, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Wed, 19 Sep 2018 01:40:46 +0000 (UTC), Theodore Heise
wrote:

Any suggestions are welcome.

What's your rim strip? I was a long-time Velox user until
just this summer when I switched over to FSA rim strips
which are much thinner. They make more room for the beads of
the tires, rsulting in easier installation and easier
seating, especially with the tighter beads on foldable
tires.


Interesting question. The (Ritchey) wheels came with a yellow
plastic rim strip, and a year or so ago I replaced it with
basic Velox. I'm not sure I got the right width, but in any
case it seems to ride just a bit high on the edges. I can see
how this might be a contributor.


Mystery solved.

Your tire's inner diameter at the bead is the same size as your
rim at the painted line he
http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/rimpins.jpg

Any occlusion such as a fat rim liner can (and in your case
probably did) wreck that very precise fit.


Yes, I am now thinking this is likely to the issue. Last time I
changed the tube and tire, I noticed the tape was not well
centered at all points, so I reapplied it. It still seemed hard
to keep it far enough down in the well. Furthermore, the fact
that I changed the strip on both wheels and am having the same
problem on both also points this direction.

I will report back after I've had time to work on it.

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA
Ads
  #22  
Old October 1st 18, 01:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Theodore Heise[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 83
Default Continental Ultra Sport tires

On Mon, 24 Sep 2018 17:17:30 +0000 (UTC),
Theodore Heise wrote:
On Sun, 23 Sep 2018 09:47:21 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 9/22/2018 4:56 PM, Theodore Heise wrote:
On Fri, 21 Sep 2018 18:05:17 -0400,
Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/21/2018 2:40 PM, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Wed, 19 Sep 2018 01:40:46 +0000 (UTC), Theodore Heise
wrote:

Any suggestions are welcome.

What's your rim strip? I was a long-time Velox user until
just this summer when I switched over to FSA rim strips
which are much thinner. They make more room for the beads
of the tires, rsulting in easier installation and easier
seating, especially with the tighter beads on foldable
tires.

Interesting question. The (Ritchey) wheels came with a
yellow plastic rim strip, and a year or so ago I replaced it
with basic Velox. I'm not sure I got the right width, but
in any case it seems to ride just a bit high on the edges.
I can see how this might be a contributor.


Mystery solved.

Your tire's inner diameter at the bead is the same size as
your rim at the painted line he
http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/rimpins.jpg

Any occlusion such as a fat rim liner can (and in your case
probably did) wreck that very precise fit.


Yes, I am now thinking this is likely to the issue. Last time
I changed the tube and tire, I noticed the tape was not well
centered at all points, so I reapplied it. It still seemed
hard to keep it far enough down in the well. Furthermore, the
fact that I changed the strip on both wheels and am having the
same problem on both also points this direction.

I will report back after I've had time to work on it.


Okay, Ifinally got some time to work on these wheels. By the way,
they are labeled Ritchey WCS Zeta II.

I took off the front tire and tube, took out the 16 mm Velox, put
on the original yellow plastic Ritchey rim strip, and reinstalled
the tire. It was a bit easier to mount, but still had a low spot.

Next, I took that tire off, and put on the first one I'd had
trouble with. It was even more out of round. I noticed that a
line on the tire was spaced about 2 mm from the rim most of the
way around, but right at the rim in a place (or two?).

My conclusion is that the tire is enough too small that the bead
is pulled inward and doesn't completely seat in those areas. I
tried bouncing the wheel, and even smacking the sidewall against
the top of my workbench, but could not convince it to pop out into
place.

I put took that tire off and put the other back on. It made a
pretty good pop/ping when it was nearly fully pressured (100 psi),
but still had that one low spot. This aligns with an area of the
tire sidewall that is further into the rim, just like what I
described two paragraphs above. I beat on and bounced this wheel,
but couldn't get that last bit of tire fully seated.

So I plan to order some different tires, and will ride on this out
of round one until they come (and I can get them installed). I've
already ridden many hundreds of miles with these out of round
tires, so don't expect any problems (other than the mildly
aggravating hoping).

So the rim strip was a minor factor, but I think the basic problem
is mismatch between tire and rim diameter/circumference.

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA
  #23  
Old October 1st 18, 02:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,775
Default Continental Ultra Sport tires

On 9/30/2018 7:59 PM, Theodore Heise wrote:
On Mon, 24 Sep 2018 17:17:30 +0000 (UTC),
Theodore Heise wrote:
On Sun, 23 Sep 2018 09:47:21 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 9/22/2018 4:56 PM, Theodore Heise wrote:
On Fri, 21 Sep 2018 18:05:17 -0400,
Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/21/2018 2:40 PM, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Wed, 19 Sep 2018 01:40:46 +0000 (UTC), Theodore Heise
wrote:

Any suggestions are welcome.

What's your rim strip? I was a long-time Velox user until
just this summer when I switched over to FSA rim strips
which are much thinner. They make more room for the beads
of the tires, rsulting in easier installation and easier
seating, especially with the tighter beads on foldable
tires.

Interesting question. The (Ritchey) wheels came with a
yellow plastic rim strip, and a year or so ago I replaced it
with basic Velox. I'm not sure I got the right width, but
in any case it seems to ride just a bit high on the edges.
I can see how this might be a contributor.


Mystery solved.

Your tire's inner diameter at the bead is the same size as
your rim at the painted line he
http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/rimpins.jpg

Any occlusion such as a fat rim liner can (and in your case
probably did) wreck that very precise fit.


Yes, I am now thinking this is likely to the issue. Last time
I changed the tube and tire, I noticed the tape was not well
centered at all points, so I reapplied it. It still seemed
hard to keep it far enough down in the well. Furthermore, the
fact that I changed the strip on both wheels and am having the
same problem on both also points this direction.

I will report back after I've had time to work on it.


Okay, Ifinally got some time to work on these wheels. By the way,
they are labeled Ritchey WCS Zeta II.

I took off the front tire and tube, took out the 16 mm Velox, put
on the original yellow plastic Ritchey rim strip, and reinstalled
the tire. It was a bit easier to mount, but still had a low spot.

Next, I took that tire off, and put on the first one I'd had
trouble with. It was even more out of round. I noticed that a
line on the tire was spaced about 2 mm from the rim most of the
way around, but right at the rim in a place (or two?).

My conclusion is that the tire is enough too small that the bead
is pulled inward and doesn't completely seat in those areas. I
tried bouncing the wheel, and even smacking the sidewall against
the top of my workbench, but could not convince it to pop out into
place.

I put took that tire off and put the other back on. It made a
pretty good pop/ping when it was nearly fully pressured (100 psi),
but still had that one low spot. This aligns with an area of the
tire sidewall that is further into the rim, just like what I
described two paragraphs above. I beat on and bounced this wheel,
but couldn't get that last bit of tire fully seated.

So I plan to order some different tires, and will ride on this out
of round one until they come (and I can get them installed). I've
already ridden many hundreds of miles with these out of round
tires, so don't expect any problems (other than the mildly
aggravating hoping).

So the rim strip was a minor factor, but I think the basic problem
is mismatch between tire and rim diameter/circumference.


Could be.

Did you use any lubricant for tire mounting? Just as
car/truck tires are seated using soapy water (or branded
similar 'tire seat' fluids) a schpritz of spray wax can
often help here. Spin rim in midair, spray it, mount tire.

Also you can pull up a tire from a low spot to a satisfying
'pop' as it seats. Bouncing a wheel won't move anything.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #24  
Old October 1st 18, 03:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Theodore Heise[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 83
Default Continental Ultra Sport tires

On Sun, 30 Sep 2018 20:54:54 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 9/30/2018 7:59 PM, Theodore Heise wrote:
On Mon, 24 Sep 2018 17:17:30 +0000 (UTC),
Theodore Heise wrote:
On Sun, 23 Sep 2018 09:47:21 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:


Your tire's inner diameter at the bead is the same size as
your rim at the painted line he
http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/rimpins.jpg

Any occlusion such as a fat rim liner can (and in your
case probably did) wreck that very precise fit.

Yes, I am now thinking this is likely to the issue. Last
time I changed the tube and tire, I noticed the tape was
not well centered at all points, so I reapplied it. It
still seemed hard to keep it far enough down in the well.
Furthermore, the fact that I changed the strip on both
wheels and am having the same problem on both also points
this direction.

I will report back after I've had time to work on it.


Okay, Ifinally got some time to work on these wheels. By the
way, they are labeled Ritchey WCS Zeta II.

I took off the front tire and tube, took out the 16 mm Velox,
put on the original yellow plastic Ritchey rim strip, and
reinstalled the tire. It was a bit easier to mount, but still
had a low spot.

Next, I took that tire off, and put on the first one I'd had
trouble with. It was even more out of round. I noticed that
a line on the tire was spaced about 2 mm from the rim most of
the way around, but right at the rim in a place (or two?).

My conclusion is that the tire is enough too small that the
bead is pulled inward and doesn't completely seat in those
areas. I tried bouncing the wheel, and even smacking the
sidewall against the top of my workbench, but could not
convince it to pop out into place.

I put took that tire off and put the other back on. It made a
pretty good pop/ping when it was nearly fully pressured (100
psi), but still had that one low spot. This aligns with an
area of the tire sidewall that is further into the rim, just
like what I described two paragraphs above. I beat on and
bounced this wheel, but couldn't get that last bit of tire
fully seated.

So I plan to order some different tires, and will ride on this
out of round one until they come (and I can get them
installed). I've already ridden many hundreds of miles with
these out of round tires, so don't expect any problems (other
than the mildly aggravating hoping).

So the rim strip was a minor factor, but I think the basic
problem is mismatch between tire and rim
diameter/circumference.


Could be.

Did you use any lubricant for tire mounting? Just as car/truck
tires are seated using soapy water (or branded similar 'tire
seat' fluids) a schpritz of spray wax can often help here. Spin
rim in midair, spray it, mount tire.

Also you can pull up a tire from a low spot to a satisfying
'pop' as it seats. Bouncing a wheel won't move anything.


Okay, thanks for the suggestions. I will give it one more go
(probably not before the coming weekend) and let you know what
happens.

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA
  #25  
Old October 1st 18, 04:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Theodore Heise[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 83
Default Continental Ultra Sport tires

On Sun, 30 Sep 2018 20:54:54 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 9/30/2018 7:59 PM, Theodore Heise wrote:


...I noticed that a line on the tire was spaced about 2 mm
from the rim most of the way around, but right at the rim in a
place (or two?).

My conclusion is that the tire is enough too small that the
bead is pulled inward and doesn't completely seat in those
areas. I tried bouncing the wheel, and even smacking the
sidewall against the top of my workbench, but could not
convince it to pop out into place.


So the rim strip was a minor factor, but I think the basic
problem is mismatch between tire and rim
diameter/circumference.


Could be.

Did you use any lubricant for tire mounting? Just as car/truck
tires are seated using soapy water (or branded similar 'tire
seat' fluids) a schpritz of spray wax can often help here. Spin
rim in midair, spray it, mount tire.

Also you can pull up a tire from a low spot to a satisfying
'pop' as it seats. Bouncing a wheel won't move anything.


I had a follow-up question on this suggestion to "pull up" the
tire. How is this done?

I attempted something like this (I think) by whacking the inflated
tire sideways onto my workbench (as mentioned above). More
specifically, I did this by holding the wheel at the 7 and 5
o'clock positions with each hand just above the workbench top, and
swinging the 12:00 position of the wheel downward so the tire
sidewall made contact with the benchtop.

Maybe I need a different approach, or to do this with the tire
only partially inflated?

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA
  #26  
Old October 1st 18, 04:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,767
Default Continental Ultra Sport tires

On Monday, October 1, 2018 at 11:22:27 AM UTC-4, Theodore Heise wrote:
Snipped
I had a follow-up question on this suggestion to "pull up" the
tire. How is this done?

I attempted something like this (I think) by whacking the inflated
tire sideways onto my workbench (as mentioned above). More
specifically, I did this by holding the wheel at the 7 and 5
o'clock positions with each hand just above the workbench top, and
swinging the 12:00 position of the wheel downward so the tire
sidewall made contact with the benchtop.

Maybe I need a different approach, or to do this with the tire
only partially inflated?

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA


What I did when I had this problem a long time ago was:

1. Made sure the rim tape was not sitting where the tire bead goes
2. partially inflated the tire
3. used washing up fluid/dish soap to lubricate the rim and the tire bead where the low spot was
4. pumped up the tire and watched to see if the bead popped up on its own
5. if the tire bead did not pop up on its own I let some air out of the tire and then squeezed the tire from each side with one hand a worked the tire from side to side to see if that caused the tire bead to seat properly.
6. if t hat didn't work I then used a pair of vice grips to hold the tire sides squeezed together a bit and then pumped up the tire whilst pulling up on the vice grips.

I never had a tire that would not seat after doing those things.

Good luck and cheers
  #27  
Old October 1st 18, 05:45 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,775
Default Continental Ultra Sport tires

On 10/1/2018 10:22 AM, Theodore Heise wrote:
On Sun, 30 Sep 2018 20:54:54 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 9/30/2018 7:59 PM, Theodore Heise wrote:


...I noticed that a line on the tire was spaced about 2 mm
from the rim most of the way around, but right at the rim in a
place (or two?).

My conclusion is that the tire is enough too small that the
bead is pulled inward and doesn't completely seat in those
areas. I tried bouncing the wheel, and even smacking the
sidewall against the top of my workbench, but could not
convince it to pop out into place.


So the rim strip was a minor factor, but I think the basic
problem is mismatch between tire and rim
diameter/circumference.


Could be.

Did you use any lubricant for tire mounting? Just as car/truck
tires are seated using soapy water (or branded similar 'tire
seat' fluids) a schpritz of spray wax can often help here. Spin
rim in midair, spray it, mount tire.

Also you can pull up a tire from a low spot to a satisfying
'pop' as it seats. Bouncing a wheel won't move anything.


I had a follow-up question on this suggestion to "pull up" the
tire. How is this done?

I attempted something like this (I think) by whacking the inflated
tire sideways onto my workbench (as mentioned above). More
specifically, I did this by holding the wheel at the 7 and 5
o'clock positions with each hand just above the workbench top, and
swinging the 12:00 position of the wheel downward so the tire
sidewall made contact with the benchtop.

Maybe I need a different approach, or to do this with the tire
only partially inflated?


Grab the tire firmly where it's low. Squeeze/push/roll the
tire up and away from the rim.

There are tools for that:
https://www.ison-distribution.com/im...l/2br-tst1.jpg

but strong hands alone will seat most.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #28  
Old October 1st 18, 06:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Theodore Heise[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 83
Default Continental Ultra Sport tires

On Mon, 01 Oct 2018 11:45:34 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 10/1/2018 10:22 AM, Theodore Heise wrote:
On Sun, 30 Sep 2018 20:54:54 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 9/30/2018 7:59 PM, Theodore Heise wrote:


...I noticed that a line on the tire was spaced about 2 mm
from the rim most of the way around, but right at the rim in a
place (or two?).

My conclusion is that the tire is enough too small that the
bead is pulled inward and doesn't completely seat in those
areas. I tried bouncing the wheel, and even smacking the
sidewall against the top of my workbench, but could not
convince it to pop out into place.


So the rim strip was a minor factor, but I think the basic
problem is mismatch between tire and rim
diameter/circumference.


Could be.

Did you use any lubricant for tire mounting? Just as car/truck
tires are seated using soapy water (or branded similar 'tire
seat' fluids) a schpritz of spray wax can often help here. Spin
rim in midair, spray it, mount tire.

Also you can pull up a tire from a low spot to a satisfying
'pop' as it seats. Bouncing a wheel won't move anything.


I had a follow-up question on this suggestion to "pull up" the
tire. How is this done?

I attempted something like this (I think) by whacking the inflated
tire sideways onto my workbench (as mentioned above). More
specifically, I did this by holding the wheel at the 7 and 5
o'clock positions with each hand just above the workbench top, and
swinging the 12:00 position of the wheel downward so the tire
sidewall made contact with the benchtop.

Maybe I need a different approach, or to do this with the tire
only partially inflated?


Grab the tire firmly where it's low. Squeeze/push/roll the
tire up and away from the rim.


Does it matter whether it's fully inflated or not?


There are tools for that:
https://www.ison-distribution.com/im...l/2br-tst1.jpg

but strong hands alone will seat most.


Thanks (and to sir) for the advice.

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA
  #29  
Old October 1st 18, 07:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 320
Default Continental Ultra Sport tires

On Monday, October 1, 2018 at 10:23:19 AM UTC-7, Theodore Heise wrote:
On Mon, 01 Oct 2018 11:45:34 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 10/1/2018 10:22 AM, Theodore Heise wrote:
On Sun, 30 Sep 2018 20:54:54 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 9/30/2018 7:59 PM, Theodore Heise wrote:

...I noticed that a line on the tire was spaced about 2 mm
from the rim most of the way around, but right at the rim in a
place (or two?).

My conclusion is that the tire is enough too small that the
bead is pulled inward and doesn't completely seat in those
areas. I tried bouncing the wheel, and even smacking the
sidewall against the top of my workbench, but could not
convince it to pop out into place.

So the rim strip was a minor factor, but I think the basic
problem is mismatch between tire and rim
diameter/circumference.


Could be.

Did you use any lubricant for tire mounting? Just as car/truck
tires are seated using soapy water (or branded similar 'tire
seat' fluids) a schpritz of spray wax can often help here. Spin
rim in midair, spray it, mount tire.

Also you can pull up a tire from a low spot to a satisfying
'pop' as it seats. Bouncing a wheel won't move anything.

I had a follow-up question on this suggestion to "pull up" the
tire. How is this done?

I attempted something like this (I think) by whacking the inflated
tire sideways onto my workbench (as mentioned above). More
specifically, I did this by holding the wheel at the 7 and 5
o'clock positions with each hand just above the workbench top, and
swinging the 12:00 position of the wheel downward so the tire
sidewall made contact with the benchtop.

Maybe I need a different approach, or to do this with the tire
only partially inflated?


Grab the tire firmly where it's low. Squeeze/push/roll the
tire up and away from the rim.


Does it matter whether it's fully inflated or not?


There are tools for that:
https://www.ison-distribution.com/im...l/2br-tst1.jpg

but strong hands alone will seat most.


Thanks (and to sir) for the advice.

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA


What all this sounds to me like is that you have "two-way" or "tubeless" rims and Continental tires will not work properly with those wheels. They are clincher tires. Continental is presently working on tubeless tires and they are expected to be released next spring.
  #30  
Old October 1st 18, 09:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Theodore Heise[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 83
Default Continental Ultra Sport tires

On Mon, 1 Oct 2018 11:28:32 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:
On Monday, October 1, 2018 at 10:23:19 AM UTC-7, Theodore Heise wrote:
On Mon, 01 Oct 2018 11:45:34 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:


Grab the tire firmly where it's low. Squeeze/push/roll the
tire up and away from the rim.


Does it matter whether it's fully inflated or not?

There are tools for that:
https://www.ison-distribution.com/im...l/2br-tst1.jpg

but strong hands alone will seat most.


Thanks (and to sir) for the advice.


What all this sounds to me like is that you have "two-way" or
"tubeless" rims and Continental tires will not work properly
with those wheels. They are clincher tires. Continental is
presently working on tubeless tires and they are expected to be
released next spring.


Except the bike is about four years old, and the rims worked okay
with previous Continental clincher tires--just different models.

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA
 




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