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hex entry at the back of pedal



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 29th 18, 06:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

Today I replaced the pedals on a modern bike
with regular ones, which are just commodity
items from the hardware store. The modern
pedals are too short and, without using such
shoes, the interface to fixate them becomes an
uncomfortable blob under the foot.

Anyway first thing I noticed was an entry for
a hex key at the back of the pedal "screw
block" (?)

I removed the pedals just like a would with the
single speed, old steel bikes, i.e. a long
pipe, a 15mm wrench, a string to hold the crank
to the chainstay, CRC 5-56 (probably not needed
even), left pedal LT, right pedal regular, and
so very little force needed for the pedal to
come loose.

So what is the reason for the hex entry and
when do you use it?

BTW does anyone have an image with pedal parts
and terminology? I image googled but didn't
find anything to that end.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
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  #2  
Old September 29th 18, 07:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,781
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

On 9/29/2018 12:59 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I replaced the pedals on a modern bike
with regular ones, which are just commodity
items from the hardware store. The modern
pedals are too short and, without using such
shoes, the interface to fixate them becomes an
uncomfortable blob under the foot.

Anyway first thing I noticed was an entry for
a hex key at the back of the pedal "screw
block" (?)

I removed the pedals just like a would with the
single speed, old steel bikes, i.e. a long
pipe, a 15mm wrench, a string to hold the crank
to the chainstay, CRC 5-56 (probably not needed
even), left pedal LT, right pedal regular, and
so very little force needed for the pedal to
come loose.

So what is the reason for the hex entry and
when do you use it?

BTW does anyone have an image with pedal parts
and terminology? I image googled but didn't
find anything to that end.


Pedal spindle (or axle - people use both terms) with allen
broach:
https://outdoorgearlab-mvnab3pwrvp3t...46_3693_XL.jpg

offers faster assembly:
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$%28KGrHqZ,!lIE2EP64yPuBNhl+JMIDw~~_35.JPG?set_id= 8800005007

Fully tighten, or break free to remove, with 15mm pedal wrench.

Some pedals omit the wrench flats and have an 8mm allen
broach only on the inside.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #3  
Old September 29th 18, 07:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

AMuzi wrote:

Pedal spindle (or axle - people use both
terms) with allen broach:
https://outdoorgearlab-mvnab3pwrvp3t...46_3693_XL.jpg

offers faster assembly:
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$%28KGrHqZ,!lIE2EP64yPuBNhl+JMIDw~~_35.JPG?set_id= 8800005007

Fully tighten, or break free to remove, with
15mm pedal wrench.


Of course, that makes sense! Thanks!

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #4  
Old September 29th 18, 08:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,441
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

On Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 11:11:58 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/29/2018 12:59 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I replaced the pedals on a modern bike
with regular ones, which are just commodity
items from the hardware store. The modern
pedals are too short and, without using such
shoes, the interface to fixate them becomes an
uncomfortable blob under the foot.

Anyway first thing I noticed was an entry for
a hex key at the back of the pedal "screw
block" (?)

I removed the pedals just like a would with the
single speed, old steel bikes, i.e. a long
pipe, a 15mm wrench, a string to hold the crank
to the chainstay, CRC 5-56 (probably not needed
even), left pedal LT, right pedal regular, and
so very little force needed for the pedal to
come loose.

So what is the reason for the hex entry and
when do you use it?

BTW does anyone have an image with pedal parts
and terminology? I image googled but didn't
find anything to that end.


Pedal spindle (or axle - people use both terms) with allen
broach:
https://outdoorgearlab-mvnab3pwrvp3t...46_3693_XL.jpg

offers faster assembly:
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$%28KGrHqZ,!lIE2EP64yPuBNhl+JMIDw~~_35.JPG?set_id= 8800005007

Fully tighten, or break free to remove, with 15mm pedal wrench.

Some pedals omit the wrench flats and have an 8mm allen
broach only on the inside.


Which I consider to be a huge step backwards. It's like putting the zipper pull for your fly on the inside -- or putting shoe laces under the tongue.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #5  
Old September 29th 18, 08:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,554
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

On 2018-09-29 11:12, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/29/2018 12:59 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I replaced the pedals on a modern bike
with regular ones, which are just commodity
items from the hardware store. The modern
pedals are too short and, without using such
shoes, the interface to fixate them becomes an
uncomfortable blob under the foot.



You aren't supposed to ride click pedals with regular shoes :-)


Anyway first thing I noticed was an entry for
a hex key at the back of the pedal "screw
block" (?)

I removed the pedals just like a would with the
single speed, old steel bikes, i.e. a long
pipe, a 15mm wrench, a string to hold the crank
to the chainstay, CRC 5-56 (probably not needed
even), left pedal LT, right pedal regular, and
so very little force needed for the pedal to
come loose.

So what is the reason for the hex entry and
when do you use it?

BTW does anyone have an image with pedal parts
and terminology? I image googled but didn't
find anything to that end.


Pedal spindle (or axle - people use both terms) with allen broach:
https://outdoorgearlab-mvnab3pwrvp3t...46_3693_XL.jpg


offers faster assembly:
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$%28KGrHqZ,!lIE2EP64yPuBNhl+JMIDw~~_35.JPG?set_id= 8800005007


Or use a power drill with an allen bit in there, faster. We even use a
power drill to make bread dough.


Fully tighten, or break free to remove, with 15mm pedal wrench.

Some pedals omit the wrench flats and have an 8mm allen broach only on
the inside.


That sounds scary, I'd never buy those. 8mm ist too wimpy for a nice
tight fit.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #6  
Old September 29th 18, 09:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,441
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

On Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 12:36:21 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-29 11:12, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/29/2018 12:59 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I replaced the pedals on a modern bike
with regular ones, which are just commodity
items from the hardware store. The modern
pedals are too short and, without using such
shoes, the interface to fixate them becomes an
uncomfortable blob under the foot.



You aren't supposed to ride click pedals with regular shoes :-)


Anyway first thing I noticed was an entry for
a hex key at the back of the pedal "screw
block" (?)

I removed the pedals just like a would with the
single speed, old steel bikes, i.e. a long
pipe, a 15mm wrench, a string to hold the crank
to the chainstay, CRC 5-56 (probably not needed
even), left pedal LT, right pedal regular, and
so very little force needed for the pedal to
come loose.

So what is the reason for the hex entry and
when do you use it?

BTW does anyone have an image with pedal parts
and terminology? I image googled but didn't
find anything to that end.


Pedal spindle (or axle - people use both terms) with allen broach:
https://outdoorgearlab-mvnab3pwrvp3t...46_3693_XL.jpg


offers faster assembly:
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$%28KGrHqZ,!lIE2EP64yPuBNhl+JMIDw~~_35.JPG?set_id= 8800005007


Or use a power drill with an allen bit in there, faster. We even use a
power drill to make bread dough.


Fully tighten, or break free to remove, with 15mm pedal wrench.

Some pedals omit the wrench flats and have an 8mm allen broach only on
the inside.


That sounds scary, I'd never buy those. 8mm ist too wimpy for a nice
tight fit.


Virtually every rider in the pro peleton has pedals tightened with an 8mm hex wrench. https://www.excelsports.com/assets/z...y/112594-5.jpg It's not a problem. It's just inconvenient as compared to the old days of wrench flats.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #7  
Old September 29th 18, 09:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,554
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

On 2018-09-29 13:12, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 12:36:21 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-29 11:12, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/29/2018 12:59 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I replaced the pedals on a modern bike with regular ones,
which are just commodity items from the hardware store. The
modern pedals are too short and, without using such shoes, the
interface to fixate them becomes an uncomfortable blob under
the foot.



You aren't supposed to ride click pedals with regular shoes :-)


Anyway first thing I noticed was an entry for a hex key at the
back of the pedal "screw block" (?)

I removed the pedals just like a would with the single speed,
old steel bikes, i.e. a long pipe, a 15mm wrench, a string to
hold the crank to the chainstay, CRC 5-56 (probably not needed
even), left pedal LT, right pedal regular, and so very little
force needed for the pedal to come loose.

So what is the reason for the hex entry and when do you use
it?

BTW does anyone have an image with pedal parts and terminology?
I image googled but didn't find anything to that end.


Pedal spindle (or axle - people use both terms) with allen
broach:
https://outdoorgearlab-mvnab3pwrvp3t...46_3693_XL.jpg




offers faster assembly:
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$%28KGrHqZ,!lIE2EP64yPuBNhl+JMIDw~~_35.JPG?set_id= 8800005007




Or use a power drill with an allen bit in there, faster. We even use a
power drill to make bread dough.


Fully tighten, or break free to remove, with 15mm pedal wrench.

Some pedals omit the wrench flats and have an 8mm allen broach
only on the inside.


That sounds scary, I'd never buy those. 8mm ist too wimpy for a
nice tight fit.


Virtually every rider in the pro peleton has pedals tightened with an
8mm hex wrench.
https://www.excelsports.com/assets/z...y/112594-5.jpg It's
not a problem.



But those guys don't weigh over 200lbs :-)


It's just inconvenient as compared to the old days of
wrench flats.


It sure looks like it but probably shaves off a couple of grams in
weight so you can arrive 200 microseconds earlier than the other guy.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #8  
Old September 29th 18, 09:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,268
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

Joerg wrote:
:On 2018-09-29 11:12, AMuzi wrote:
: On 9/29/2018 12:59 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
: Today I replaced the pedals on a modern bike
: with regular ones, which are just commodity
: items from the hardware store. The modern
: pedals are too short and, without using such
: shoes, the interface to fixate them becomes an
: uncomfortable blob under the foot.


:You aren't supposed to ride click pedals with regular shoes :-)

:
: Anyway first thing I noticed was an entry for
: a hex key at the back of the pedal "screw
: block" (?)
:
: I removed the pedals just like a would with the
: single speed, old steel bikes, i.e. a long
: pipe, a 15mm wrench, a string to hold the crank
: to the chainstay, CRC 5-56 (probably not needed
: even), left pedal LT, right pedal regular, and
: so very little force needed for the pedal to
: come loose.
:
: So what is the reason for the hex entry and
: when do you use it?
:
: BTW does anyone have an image with pedal parts
: and terminology? I image googled but didn't
: find anything to that end.
:
:
: Pedal spindle (or axle - people use both terms) with allen broach:
: https://outdoorgearlab-mvnab3pwrvp3t...46_3693_XL.jpg
:
:
: offers faster assembly:
: http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$%28KGrHqZ,!lIE2EP64yPuBNhl+JMIDw~~_35.JPG?set_id= 8800005007
:

:Or use a power drill with an allen bit in there, faster. We even use a
ower drill to make bread dough.

:
: Fully tighten, or break free to remove, with 15mm pedal wrench.
:
: Some pedals omit the wrench flats and have an 8mm allen broach only on
: the inside.
:

:That sounds scary, I'd never buy those. 8mm ist too wimpy for a nice
:tight fit.

Typical torque spec for a 12.9 grade 10mm socket head screw, which is
what has an 8mm hex socket, is 80 NM (~60 foot pounds). Shimano
pedals are 35 or 40 NM (25 to 29 ft pounds), as I recall. If you can't do that with a hex bit, you are not competent to work on anything.

--
sig 89
  #9  
Old September 29th 18, 10:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,441
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

On Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 1:19:02 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-29 13:12, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 12:36:21 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-29 11:12, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/29/2018 12:59 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I replaced the pedals on a modern bike with regular ones,
which are just commodity items from the hardware store. The
modern pedals are too short and, without using such shoes, the
interface to fixate them becomes an uncomfortable blob under
the foot.


You aren't supposed to ride click pedals with regular shoes :-)


Anyway first thing I noticed was an entry for a hex key at the
back of the pedal "screw block" (?)

I removed the pedals just like a would with the single speed,
old steel bikes, i.e. a long pipe, a 15mm wrench, a string to
hold the crank to the chainstay, CRC 5-56 (probably not needed
even), left pedal LT, right pedal regular, and so very little
force needed for the pedal to come loose.

So what is the reason for the hex entry and when do you use
it?

BTW does anyone have an image with pedal parts and terminology?
I image googled but didn't find anything to that end.


Pedal spindle (or axle - people use both terms) with allen
broach:
https://outdoorgearlab-mvnab3pwrvp3t...46_3693_XL.jpg




offers faster assembly:
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$%28KGrHqZ,!lIE2EP64yPuBNhl+JMIDw~~_35.JPG?set_id= 8800005007




Or use a power drill with an allen bit in there, faster. We even use a
power drill to make bread dough.


Fully tighten, or break free to remove, with 15mm pedal wrench.

Some pedals omit the wrench flats and have an 8mm allen broach
only on the inside.


That sounds scary, I'd never buy those. 8mm ist too wimpy for a
nice tight fit.


Virtually every rider in the pro peleton has pedals tightened with an
8mm hex wrench.
https://www.excelsports.com/assets/z...y/112594-5.jpg It's
not a problem.



But those guys don't weigh over 200lbs :-)


Yah, but the pros produce two or three times your power and a much higher seated crank bending load than you do. I raced for years at the 200lb mark and bent or broke some pedal spindles -- with flats (early Look and early DuraAce which were re-branded Look). I've never had a problem with the 8mm hex spindle on recent Looks or the XT level Shimano SPD pedals that are hex-only. Those things are bullet proof. Plenty of big boys ride the Shimano road pedals. The design is inconvenient, but it is not scary or dangerous.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #10  
Old September 29th 18, 10:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

David Scheidt wrote:

Typical torque spec for a 12.9 grade 10mm
socket head screw, which is what has an 8mm
hex socket, is 80 NM (~60 foot pounds).
Shimano pedals are 35 or 40 NM (25 to 29 ft
pounds), as I recall. If you can't do that
with a hex bit, you are not competent to work
on anything.


40nm, isn't that the typical casette torque?
You are supposed to do that with an 8mm allen
wrench? Not that I ever saw this situation
first hand!

BTW I don't think I put the pedals in that
hard. I have a torque wrench but for sockets,
not an open spanner - unless you can buy that
as a separate part and plug it in?

But I doubt they (the pedals) will get much
deeper anyhow...?

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
 




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