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reflective tape



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 9th 18, 06:44 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default reflective tape

Today I put some white reflective tape front,
and some red rear, on a bike. Pointing a 38lm
flashlight at it from ~1.5m makes for a very
visible reaction.

The only downside was that the tape gave the
impression of not really sticking to the bike.
On the casette saddle-stay side, I had to clean
the stay with acetone before it would stick
at all.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
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  #2  
Old October 9th 18, 10:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,353
Default reflective tape

On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 12:44:47 PM UTC-5, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I put some white reflective tape front,
and some red rear, on a bike. Pointing a 38lm
flashlight at it from ~1.5m makes for a very
visible reaction.

The only downside was that the tape gave the
impression of not really sticking to the bike.
On the casette saddle-stay side, I had to clean
the stay with acetone before it would stick
at all.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


I put reflective tape on the frame and rims of the bike I used on Paris Brest Paris. It was some silvery white reflective tape. I covered the entire frame, except the headtube. And strips between every other spoke. When car headlights were shined on the bike, when driving into the garage, the bike lit up like a beacon. It was very noticeable when lights hit it. From any angle.
  #3  
Old October 9th 18, 11:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,329
Default reflective tape

On 10/9/2018 5:42 PM, wrote:
On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 12:44:47 PM UTC-5, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I put some white reflective tape front,
and some red rear, on a bike. Pointing a 38lm
flashlight at it from ~1.5m makes for a very
visible reaction.

The only downside was that the tape gave the
impression of not really sticking to the bike.
On the casette saddle-stay side, I had to clean
the stay with acetone before it would stick
at all.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573

I put reflective tape on the frame and rims of the bike I used on Paris Brest Paris. It was some silvery white reflective tape. I covered the entire frame, except the headtube. And strips between every other spoke. When car headlights were shined on the bike, when driving into the garage, the bike lit up like a beacon. It was very noticeable when lights hit it. From any angle.


I like the stuff, although I haven't indulged to anything like that same
degree. I've got it on pedals, a spot or two on a crank arm or two, some
dots on the spoke bed surface of some bike's rims, etc.

But you have to keep it clean. And treat it as an extra measure, not as
an alternative to legal requirements.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #4  
Old October 11th 18, 12:04 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,908
Default reflective tape

On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 19:44:23 +0200, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

On the casette saddle-stay side, I had to clean
the stay with acetone before it would stick
at all.


Careful with acetone. It will attack some paints and any plastics:
http://www.plasticsintl.com/plastics_chemical_resistence_chart.html
Click the "Acetone" check box - "Show Selected"
If all you want to do is remove the grease, something milder like
alcohol, mineral spirits, or naphtha should be sufficient.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #5  
Old October 11th 18, 06:57 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,035
Default reflective tape

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Careful with acetone. It will attack some
paints and any plastics:
http://www.plasticsintl.com/plastics_chemical_resistence_chart.html
Click the "Acetone" check box - "Show
Selected" If all you want to do is remove the
grease, something milder like alcohol,
mineral spirits, or naphtha should
be sufficient.


OK, thanks.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #6  
Old October 16th 18, 08:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 102
Default reflective tape

On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 6:43:28 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/9/2018 5:42 PM, russellseaton1 wrote:
On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 12:44:47 PM UTC-5, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I put some white reflective tape front,
and some red rear, on a bike. Pointing a 38lm
flashlight at it from ~1.5m makes for a very
visible reaction.

The only downside was that the tape gave the
impression of not really sticking to the bike.
On the casette saddle-stay side, I had to clean
the stay with acetone before it would stick
at all.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


I put reflective tape on the frame and rims of the bike I used on Paris Brest Paris. It was some silvery white reflective tape. I covered the entire frame, except the headtube. And strips between every other spoke. When car headlights were shined on the bike, when driving into the garage, the bike lit up like a beacon. It was very noticeable when lights hit it. From any angle.


I like the stuff, although I haven't indulged to anything like that same
degree. I've got it on pedals, a spot or two on a crank arm or two, some
dots on the spoke bed surface of some bike's rims, etc.

But you have to keep it clean. And treat it as an extra measure, not as
an alternative to legal requirements.


Applied correctly in Ontario, it meets the requirement that a bicycle display reflectors front and rear. My bike has strips of reflective white tape about 10" by 1" on each fork blade, and reflective red tape the same size on each seat stay. I cleaned the surfaces with alcohol before applying the tape.
--
Andrew Chaplin
SIT MIHI GLADIUS SICUT SANCTO MARTINO
  #7  
Old October 16th 18, 09:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 196
Default reflective tape

On 16/10/2018 3:35 PM, wrote:
On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 6:43:28 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/9/2018 5:42 PM, russellseaton1 wrote:
On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 12:44:47 PM UTC-5, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I put some white reflective tape front,
and some red rear, on a bike. Pointing a 38lm
flashlight at it from ~1.5m makes for a very
visible reaction.

The only downside was that the tape gave the
impression of not really sticking to the bike.
On the casette saddle-stay side, I had to clean
the stay with acetone before it would stick
at all.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573

I put reflective tape on the frame and rims of the bike I used on Paris Brest Paris. It was some silvery white reflective tape. I covered the entire frame, except the headtube. And strips between every other spoke. When car headlights were shined on the bike, when driving into the garage, the bike lit up like a beacon. It was very noticeable when lights hit it. From any angle.


I like the stuff, although I haven't indulged to anything like that same
degree. I've got it on pedals, a spot or two on a crank arm or two, some
dots on the spoke bed surface of some bike's rims, etc.

But you have to keep it clean. And treat it as an extra measure, not as
an alternative to legal requirements.


Applied correctly in Ontario, it meets the requirement that a bicycle display reflectors front and rear. My bike has strips of reflective white tape about 10" by 1" on each fork blade, and reflective red tape the same size on each seat stay. I cleaned the surfaces with alcohol before applying the tape.


In Quebec the reflective tape can be used in lieu of wheel protectors
and pedals but in the case of the front and rear reflectors there is no
exclusion for actual reflectors. Doesn't make any sense but some cases
have been reported where tickets were issued. And the fines have
increased from $15 per reflector to $85.

Just a heads up if you ride across the border.
  #8  
Old October 16th 18, 10:44 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,761
Default reflective tape

On Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 4:22:01 PM UTC-4, duane wrote:
On 16/10/2018 3:35 PM, wrote:
On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 6:43:28 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/9/2018 5:42 PM, russellseaton1 wrote:
On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 12:44:47 PM UTC-5, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I put some white reflective tape front,
and some red rear, on a bike. Pointing a 38lm
flashlight at it from ~1.5m makes for a very
visible reaction.

The only downside was that the tape gave the
impression of not really sticking to the bike.
On the casette saddle-stay side, I had to clean
the stay with acetone before it would stick
at all.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573

I put reflective tape on the frame and rims of the bike I used on Paris Brest Paris. It was some silvery white reflective tape. I covered the entire frame, except the headtube. And strips between every other spoke. When car headlights were shined on the bike, when driving into the garage, the bike lit up like a beacon. It was very noticeable when lights hit it. From any angle.

I like the stuff, although I haven't indulged to anything like that same
degree. I've got it on pedals, a spot or two on a crank arm or two, some
dots on the spoke bed surface of some bike's rims, etc.

But you have to keep it clean. And treat it as an extra measure, not as
an alternative to legal requirements.


Applied correctly in Ontario, it meets the requirement that a bicycle display reflectors front and rear. My bike has strips of reflective white tape about 10" by 1" on each fork blade, and reflective red tape the same size on each seat stay. I cleaned the surfaces with alcohol before applying the tape.


In Quebec the reflective tape can be used in lieu of wheel protectors
and pedals but in the case of the front and rear reflectors there is no
exclusion for actual reflectors. Doesn't make any sense but some cases
have been reported where tickets were issued. And the fines have
increased from $15 per reflector to $85.

Just a heads up if you ride across the border.


IIRC, Ontario Canada requires BOTH a front facing white reflector and white reflective tape, plus a red rear facing reflector plus the red reflective tape.

Cheers
  #9  
Old October 17th 18, 02:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 196
Default reflective tape

On 16/10/2018 5:44 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 4:22:01 PM UTC-4, duane wrote:
On 16/10/2018 3:35 PM, wrote:
On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 6:43:28 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/9/2018 5:42 PM, russellseaton1 wrote:
On Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 12:44:47 PM UTC-5, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I put some white reflective tape front,
and some red rear, on a bike. Pointing a 38lm
flashlight at it from ~1.5m makes for a very
visible reaction.

The only downside was that the tape gave the
impression of not really sticking to the bike.
On the casette saddle-stay side, I had to clean
the stay with acetone before it would stick
at all.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573

I put reflective tape on the frame and rims of the bike I used on Paris Brest Paris. It was some silvery white reflective tape. I covered the entire frame, except the headtube. And strips between every other spoke. When car headlights were shined on the bike, when driving into the garage, the bike lit up like a beacon. It was very noticeable when lights hit it. From any angle.

I like the stuff, although I haven't indulged to anything like that same
degree. I've got it on pedals, a spot or two on a crank arm or two, some
dots on the spoke bed surface of some bike's rims, etc.

But you have to keep it clean. And treat it as an extra measure, not as
an alternative to legal requirements.

Applied correctly in Ontario, it meets the requirement that a bicycle display reflectors front and rear. My bike has strips of reflective white tape about 10" by 1" on each fork blade, and reflective red tape the same size on each seat stay. I cleaned the surfaces with alcohol before applying the tape.


In Quebec the reflective tape can be used in lieu of wheel protectors
and pedals but in the case of the front and rear reflectors there is no
exclusion for actual reflectors. Doesn't make any sense but some cases
have been reported where tickets were issued. And the fines have
increased from $15 per reflector to $85.

Just a heads up if you ride across the border.


IIRC, Ontario Canada requires BOTH a front facing white reflector and white reflective tape, plus a red rear facing reflector plus the red reflective tape.

Cheers


Here there is no mention of front facing white tape or rear facing red
tape. I know people that use this in lieu of reflectors due to issues
mounting the reflectors but this doesn't meet the requirement. It may
be enough for a particular policeman to let you go.

They did make allowances for clipless pedals or wheels where spoke
reflectors wouldn't work by allowing reflective tape.

This is the code:

232. Every bicycle must carry
(1) one white reflector at the front;
(2) one red reflector at the rear;
(3) one amber or white reflector on each pedal;
(4) on the front wheel, an amber or white reflector attached to the
spokes and visible on both sides of the bicycle, an amber or white
reflective strip attached to each side of the fork, a tire with
reflective sidewalls or a rim with a continuous reflective strip around
the entire circumference of the wheel on both sides; and
(5) on the back wheel, a red or white reflector attached to the spokes
and visible on both sides of the bicycle, a red or white reflective
strip on each seat stay, a tire with reflective sidewalls, or a rim with
a continuous reflective strip around the entire circumference of the
wheel on both sides.
Despite the first paragraph, a bicycle need not carry the reflector
required under subparagraph 3 of that paragraph if the cyclist wears a
reflective band around each ankle or shoes with reflective strips.
Any equipment or object placed on a bicycle that blocks a prescribed
reflector or its substitute must carry a reflector or a reflective strip.
A trailer towed by a bicycle must carry two red reflectors at the rear,
as far apart as practicable, or a red reflective strip placed as close
to horizontal as possible across the width of the trailer.
1986, c. 91, s. 232; 2010, c. 34, s. 45; 2018, c. 7, s. 43.

233. At night, every bicycle must also carry, a white headlight or light
and one red tail-light, both of which may be flashing.
1986, c. 91, s. 233; 2018, c. 7, s. 44.

233.1. No bicycle dealer shall sell, offer for sale, rent or offer for
rent a bicycle unless the bicycle complies with the requirements of the
first paragraph of section 232.
However, if the bicycle carries clipless pedals or does not have pedals,
the prohibition set out in this section does not apply as regards the
reflectors required under subparagraph 3 of the first paragraph of
section 232.
 




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