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Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?



 
 
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  #31  
Old April 29th 18, 02:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?

On Sat, 28 Apr 2018 07:18:09 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-04-27 18:35, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 4:18:58 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 15:11, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 2:10:07 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 10:57, jbeattie wrote:


[...]



Decades of racing and riding on single and dual pivot rim brakes
in the rain and never once pussyfooted except to avoid traction
loss. I've never crashed in the rain because of brake failure
(and I've crashed many times in the rain), although I had one
close-call involving some bad cantis on STI levers, but then
again, I had an even scarier incident with mis-adjusted cable
discs. My crashes were all due to traction loss.


One of my really nasty crashes happened when the front brake cable
snapped. It was almost new. That just does not happen with
hydraulic disc brakes. I had the choice of wiping out with major
road rash or chancing it into the vegetation. In either case I'd
have been toast if there had been oncoming traffic.


A catastrophic failure can happen in any system. Breaking a new
cable is a catastrophic failure. It shouldn't happen (it's never
happened to me in maybe 300K miles of riding).



I had it happen half a dozen times. My sister had it happen at least
twice. Two of those incidences caused accidents, a 3rd almost did
(blowing through a non 4-way downhill stop sign but nobody came). These
were all good quality cables bought at reputable bike shops, not
department store merchandise.


A half a dozen times? And your sister, at least twice?

It seems to me that you need to find a four leaf clover, or carry a St
Christopher medal on your bike to protect you. Or maybe a verse from
the Koran? Something anyway, as you obviously are suffering from
incredible bad luck.

In contrast to your experiences, I rode my first bicycle in about 1943
and have ridden bicycles and motorcycles and airplanes, all of which
depended on cables to control them, and have never experienced a
broken cable.

With all your cable problems I'd think that a "dead weight" cable
tester would be to your advantage. Simple to build and simple to
operate it would ensure that your cables met the necessary strength
requirements.


... You could get the
same failure with defective hydraulic tube or joint, piston, pad
holder, mounting bolt, etc. You could get a leak ...



Those are slow, you'd feel it coming. Things don't just snap.


... -- you could even blow through a pad set on a single ride.



That must be a long hard competition ride.


... A giant earthquake could wipe out your hydraulic calipers!


Yes, I suppose that could happen. Or a direct meteorite hit into the
left lever.

[...]


... I switch between disc and direct mount caliper brakes on
the weekends and find that braking is great on both.


Thanks for the hint about the Koolstop pads. They just came.
Ebay tracking is a nice "mail is here" alert. It came early
today.

They fit like a glove. I wonder why they now flare the
trailing edge inwards towards the rim. It would make the pad
want to skew. Maybe I'll grind that off.

No. It's meant to wipe the rim before the pad fully engages. It
is exactly what you want for dirt and wet weather performance.


Let's see. I could almost bet that pointy tip will be worn away
after a few hundred miles.


Depends on the 100 miles, but yes, it's not going to last forever. My
disc pads last about one-quarter the time of my rim brake pads.


Time to upgrade the disc brakes? Mine last about the same and that is
comparing a road environment for the rim pads to 90% trail riding on the
MTB. Dusty, mucky, wet and gravely trail riding. Sometimes when a stench
develops I have to pry "brake mousse" out of the front caliper. That
happens after the weeds shot up and have to I ride through them for
miles. Star thistle is particularly nasty. It tangles in the rotor
spider, then gets chopped and pureed at the caliper. Doesn't cause
performance issues but it can stink.

What wears really fast are organic pads. The kind bike shops sell you
for north of $15/pair. I like ceramic-based pads. You can't use cheap
rotors with those though, they'd eat them up. I use Shimano RT66 rotors.
They cost me $22 each, 8-inchers.

--
Cheers,

John B.

Ads
  #32  
Old April 29th 18, 04:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,329
Default Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?

On 4/28/2018 5:47 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, April 28, 2018 at 7:17:42 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 18:35, jbeattie wrote:

A catastrophic failure can happen in any system. Breaking a new
cable is a catastrophic failure. It shouldn't happen (it's never
happened to me in maybe 300K miles of riding).


I had it happen half a dozen times. My sister had it happen at least
twice. Two of those incidences caused accidents, a 3rd almost did
(blowing through a non 4-way downhill stop sign but nobody came). These
were all good quality cables bought at reputable bike shops, not
department store merchandise.


Something is horribly wrong. I've never snapped a new brake cable or even broken an old one. Shift cable, yes -- STI levers with the hard bends can be rough on those little cables.


I do remember breaking a front brake cable once. That's in 40+ years of
avid adult cycling. Now I replace them every five years or so.


What wears really fast are organic pads. The kind bike shops sell you
for north of $15/pair. I like ceramic-based pads. You can't use cheap
rotors with those though, they'd eat them up. I use Shimano RT66 rotors.
They cost me $22 each, 8-inchers.


Organic are terrible, but even the metalic pads don't last that long -- not nearly as long as rim brake pads.


Again, I think it's wise to carry one spare set of pads on every disc
brake bike. This advice came from a very experienced bike tourist who
stayed with us, and who had lost all his brakes suddenly on one hilly
tour because of pad wear.

SO TECH QUESTION: what would cause periodic dragging -- and a pinging-type drag, almost like the return springs are hitting the rotor. Then it goes away, and braking is normal -- so I know the pads are not worn out and the springs are not hitting the rotor (but I will check). Piston drag? The bike is not that old, but I could bleed it. The calipers are properly centered.

Hey, I think we just discovered another benefit of disc brakes! We've
been short on really tricky bike tech problems to solve, but discs can
provide lots of new ones for us! They might even save this discussion group!


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #33  
Old April 29th 18, 05:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,548
Default Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?

On 2018-04-28 14:47, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, April 28, 2018 at 7:17:42 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 18:35, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 4:18:58 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 15:11, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 2:10:07 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 10:57, jbeattie wrote:


[...]



Decades of racing and riding on single and dual pivot rim
brakes in the rain and never once pussyfooted except to avoid
traction loss. I've never crashed in the rain because of
brake failure (and I've crashed many times in the rain),
although I had one close-call involving some bad cantis on
STI levers, but then again, I had an even scarier incident
with mis-adjusted cable discs. My crashes were all due to
traction loss.


One of my really nasty crashes happened when the front brake
cable snapped. It was almost new. That just does not happen
with hydraulic disc brakes. I had the choice of wiping out with
major road rash or chancing it into the vegetation. In either
case I'd have been toast if there had been oncoming traffic.

A catastrophic failure can happen in any system. Breaking a new
cable is a catastrophic failure. It shouldn't happen (it's never
happened to me in maybe 300K miles of riding).



I had it happen half a dozen times. My sister had it happen at
least twice. Two of those incidences caused accidents, a 3rd almost
did (blowing through a non 4-way downhill stop sign but nobody
came). These were all good quality cables bought at reputable bike
shops, not department store merchandise.


Something is horribly wrong. I've never snapped a new brake cable or
even broken an old one. Shift cable, yes -- STI levers with the hard
bends can be rough on those little cables.


I and my sister were by far not the only ones over there (Germany) that
happened to.

OTOH I can remember ever breaking a shifter cable. That wouldn't be an
emergency. I always have a screw driver in my tool kit so could set it
into a suitable position.

[...]


... I switch between disc and direct mount caliper
brakes on the weekends and find that braking is great on
both.


Thanks for the hint about the Koolstop pads. They just
came. Ebay tracking is a nice "mail is here" alert. It came
early today.

They fit like a glove. I wonder why they now flare the
trailing edge inwards towards the rim. It would make the
pad want to skew. Maybe I'll grind that off.

No. It's meant to wipe the rim before the pad fully engages.
It is exactly what you want for dirt and wet weather
performance.


Let's see. I could almost bet that pointy tip will be worn
away after a few hundred miles.

Depends on the 100 miles, but yes, it's not going to last
forever. My disc pads last about one-quarter the time of my rim
brake pads.


Time to upgrade the disc brakes? Mine last about the same and that
is comparing a road environment for the rim pads to 90% trail
riding on the MTB. Dusty, mucky, wet and gravely trail riding.
Sometimes when a stench develops I have to pry "brake mousse" out
of the front caliper. That happens after the weeds shot up and have
to I ride through them for miles. Star thistle is particularly
nasty. It tangles in the rotor spider, then gets chopped and pureed
at the caliper. Doesn't cause performance issues but it can stink.

What wears really fast are organic pads. The kind bike shops sell
you for north of $15/pair. I like ceramic-based pads. You can't use
cheap rotors with those though, they'd eat them up. I use Shimano
RT66 rotors. They cost me $22 each, 8-inchers.


Organic are terrible, but even the metalic pads don't last that long
-- not nearly as long as rim brake pads. I run 160mm rotors on the
commuter and 140/160mm rotors on every thing else (the hydraulic
bikes). I buy name-brand and not Chinese no-name replacements.


This is the puzzler, the Chinese ones last the longest and (so far) had
the best braking performance for me. Not really no-name, they are from
the Hangzhou-Novich factory and arrived in blister packs with their logo
on them. They can't always be found on the web though so when I find
them I buy in bulk because I don't get to travel to China.

My experience with MTB tires is similar. The really low cost brands from
Thailand hold up the best, provide decent traction and most of all have
sturdier side-walls than most "name brand" stuff.


I have a Norco Search gravel bike with hydraulics that my son was
riding today, and they get drag periodically and can be very
annoying. SO TECH QUESTION: what would cause periodic dragging -- and
a pinging-type drag, almost like the return springs are hitting the
rotor.



Return springs? There are usually only the little spreader clips and
they can't or should never hit the rotor. If they did that could mean
trouble.


Then it goes away, and braking is normal -- so I know the pads
are not worn out and the springs are not hitting the rotor (but I
will check). Piston drag? The bike is not that old, but I could
bleed it. The calipers are properly centered.


That is one of the occasional nuisances. My disc brakes can go tsssing
... tsssing for tens of miles. Sometimes dirt or vegetation "mousse" gets
in there. A toothpick fixes that but the drag is so miniscule and the
noise so faint that I don't bother during a ride.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #34  
Old April 30th 18, 03:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,548
Default Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?

On 2018-04-28 18:34, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 28 Apr 2018 07:18:09 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-04-27 18:35, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 4:18:58 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 15:11, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 2:10:07 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 10:57, jbeattie wrote:


[...]



Decades of racing and riding on single and dual pivot rim brakes
in the rain and never once pussyfooted except to avoid traction
loss. I've never crashed in the rain because of brake failure
(and I've crashed many times in the rain), although I had one
close-call involving some bad cantis on STI levers, but then
again, I had an even scarier incident with mis-adjusted cable
discs. My crashes were all due to traction loss.


One of my really nasty crashes happened when the front brake cable
snapped. It was almost new. That just does not happen with
hydraulic disc brakes. I had the choice of wiping out with major
road rash or chancing it into the vegetation. In either case I'd
have been toast if there had been oncoming traffic.

A catastrophic failure can happen in any system. Breaking a new
cable is a catastrophic failure. It shouldn't happen (it's never
happened to me in maybe 300K miles of riding).



I had it happen half a dozen times. My sister had it happen at least
twice. Two of those incidences caused accidents, a 3rd almost did
(blowing through a non 4-way downhill stop sign but nobody came). These
were all good quality cables bought at reputable bike shops, not
department store merchandise.


A half a dozen times? And your sister, at least twice?

It seems to me that you need to find a four leaf clover, or carry a St
Christopher medal on your bike to protect you. Or maybe a verse from
the Koran? Something anyway, as you obviously are suffering from
incredible bad luck.

In contrast to your experiences, I rode my first bicycle in about 1943
and have ridden bicycles and motorcycles and airplanes, all of which
depended on cables to control them, and have never experienced a
broken cable.


For years and years we each logged 3000-6000 miles per year. Some stuff
on bikes fails a lot, other stuff doesn't. IME brake cables are among
the less reliable parts but not nearly as unreliable as bottom bracket
bearings.


With all your cable problems I'd think that a "dead weight" cable
tester would be to your advantage. Simple to build and simple to
operate it would ensure that your cables met the necessary strength
requirements.


It won't help. At least mine didn't fail during emergency hard-pul
situations. I have learned early on not to lock up my brakes, whether on
bikes or in cars, unless it is advantageous and even then you don't need
much force. They just ... failed, out of the blue. For example, when I
cam home from school I approached the last traffic light 1/2mi from our
house. It was red, so I applied front and read brake. Front cable
snapped and the bumper of a BMW helped me to come to a stop. The driver
got out but when he saw the cable jacket flopping around in the air he
said "Oh, yes, that happens", got back in and drove off. I guess he was
a cyclist and it seemed like he also had that happen.

[...]

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #35  
Old April 30th 18, 03:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,548
Default Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?

On 2018-04-28 16:56, Mark J. wrote:
On 4/27/2018 3:11 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 2:10:07 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 10:57, jbeattie wrote:


[...]

... I switch between disc and direct mount caliper brakes on
the weekends and find that braking is great on both.


Thanks for the hint about the Koolstop pads. They just came. Ebay
tracking is a nice "mail is here" alert. It came early today.

They fit like a glove. I wonder why they now flare the trailing edge
inwards towards the rim. It would make the pad want to skew. Maybe I'll
grind that off.


No. It's meant to wipe the rim before the pad fully engages. It is
exactly what you want for dirt and wet weather performance.

-- Jay Beattie.


That pointy tip also makes it easy to toe in the pads an appropriate
amount to reduce squeal/judder. Once the pads are installed, if that
"tip" wears off, it's already served one useful purpose.


I don't toe in my pads anymore because that causes slightly uneven wear,
meaning less miles/pair. To heck with a little squeal.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #36  
Old April 30th 18, 04:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,426
Default Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?

On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 7:22:35 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-28 18:34, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 28 Apr 2018 07:18:09 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-04-27 18:35, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 4:18:58 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 15:11, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 2:10:07 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 10:57, jbeattie wrote:

[...]



Decades of racing and riding on single and dual pivot rim brakes
in the rain and never once pussyfooted except to avoid traction
loss. I've never crashed in the rain because of brake failure
(and I've crashed many times in the rain), although I had one
close-call involving some bad cantis on STI levers, but then
again, I had an even scarier incident with mis-adjusted cable
discs. My crashes were all due to traction loss.


One of my really nasty crashes happened when the front brake cable
snapped. It was almost new. That just does not happen with
hydraulic disc brakes. I had the choice of wiping out with major
road rash or chancing it into the vegetation. In either case I'd
have been toast if there had been oncoming traffic.

A catastrophic failure can happen in any system. Breaking a new
cable is a catastrophic failure. It shouldn't happen (it's never
happened to me in maybe 300K miles of riding).


I had it happen half a dozen times. My sister had it happen at least
twice. Two of those incidences caused accidents, a 3rd almost did
(blowing through a non 4-way downhill stop sign but nobody came). These
were all good quality cables bought at reputable bike shops, not
department store merchandise.


A half a dozen times? And your sister, at least twice?

It seems to me that you need to find a four leaf clover, or carry a St
Christopher medal on your bike to protect you. Or maybe a verse from
the Koran? Something anyway, as you obviously are suffering from
incredible bad luck.

In contrast to your experiences, I rode my first bicycle in about 1943
and have ridden bicycles and motorcycles and airplanes, all of which
depended on cables to control them, and have never experienced a
broken cable.


For years and years we each logged 3000-6000 miles per year. Some stuff
on bikes fails a lot, other stuff doesn't. IME brake cables are among
the less reliable parts but not nearly as unreliable as bottom bracket
bearings.


With all your cable problems I'd think that a "dead weight" cable
tester would be to your advantage. Simple to build and simple to
operate it would ensure that your cables met the necessary strength
requirements.


It won't help. At least mine didn't fail during emergency hard-pul
situations. I have learned early on not to lock up my brakes, whether on
bikes or in cars, unless it is advantageous and even then you don't need
much force. They just ... failed, out of the blue. For example, when I
cam home from school I approached the last traffic light 1/2mi from our
house. It was red, so I applied front and read brake. Front cable
snapped and the bumper of a BMW helped me to come to a stop. The driver
got out but when he saw the cable jacket flopping around in the air he
said "Oh, yes, that happens", got back in and drove off. I guess he was
a cyclist and it seemed like he also had that happen.


Where did your cables snap? Did the heads pull off? Did you change the housing after the failures?

-- Jay Beattie.
  #37  
Old April 30th 18, 05:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,548
Default Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?

On 2018-04-30 08:19, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 7:22:35 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-28 18:34, John B. wrote:


[...]


With all your cable problems I'd think that a "dead weight"
cable tester would be to your advantage. Simple to build and
simple to operate it would ensure that your cables met the
necessary strength requirements.


It won't help. At least mine didn't fail during emergency hard-pul
situations. I have learned early on not to lock up my brakes,
whether on bikes or in cars, unless it is advantageous and even
then you don't need much force. They just ... failed, out of the
blue. For example, when I cam home from school I approached the
last traffic light 1/2mi from our house. It was red, so I applied
front and read brake. Front cable snapped and the bumper of a BMW
helped me to come to a stop. The driver got out but when he saw the
cable jacket flopping around in the air he said "Oh, yes, that
happens", got back in and drove off. I guess he was a cyclist and
it seemed like he also had that happen.


Where did your cables snap? Did the heads pull off?



Yes, in all cases.


... Did you change the housing after the failures?


No, though I did smooth the channels a little with fine-grit sandpaper
and polishing paste. Couldn't help much though because the heads simply
pulled out of the cables.

Besides, why do we as end users a.k.a. consumers have to correct design
mistakes on bicycles so often?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #38  
Old April 30th 18, 09:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,426
Default Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?

On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 9:24:31 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-30 08:19, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 7:22:35 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-28 18:34, John B. wrote:


[...]


With all your cable problems I'd think that a "dead weight"
cable tester would be to your advantage. Simple to build and
simple to operate it would ensure that your cables met the
necessary strength requirements.


It won't help. At least mine didn't fail during emergency hard-pul
situations. I have learned early on not to lock up my brakes,
whether on bikes or in cars, unless it is advantageous and even
then you don't need much force. They just ... failed, out of the
blue. For example, when I cam home from school I approached the
last traffic light 1/2mi from our house. It was red, so I applied
front and read brake. Front cable snapped and the bumper of a BMW
helped me to come to a stop. The driver got out but when he saw the
cable jacket flopping around in the air he said "Oh, yes, that
happens", got back in and drove off. I guess he was a cyclist and
it seemed like he also had that happen.


Where did your cables snap? Did the heads pull off?



Yes, in all cases.


... Did you change the housing after the failures?


No, though I did smooth the channels a little with fine-grit sandpaper
and polishing paste. Couldn't help much though because the heads simply
pulled out of the cables.

Besides, why do we as end users a.k.a. consumers have to correct design
mistakes on bicycles so often?


Most cable failures occur over time and involve breaking of individual strands -- which should be noticed with routine maintenance. There are housing, lever, adjuster and ferrule designs/installations that can hasten cable failure, but a catastrophic failure probably means a defective cable. IIRC, Shimano did recall some cables 10+ years ago because of ends popping off. And most of the "design" problems with other brake parts usually result in symptoms long before the failure, like brakes that are stiff, sticky, etc. These are usually symptoms of a cheap bike, too.

More curious tech problems: I currently have an Avid BB7 rear cable disc on my commuter that is in housing all the way from the lever to the caliper. I expect drag, and the return springs on the Avid brakes are not great -- better than the first generation BB7, but still not great. So, I expect cable drag from the housing and even some pad drag caused by the weak return spring.

What I didn't expect is that the brakes would self-tighten. It's the oddest thing. The brakes just tighten up, and the torque arm is fully retracted -- so its not a stuck cable. In some instances, I think it is because the rear axle has smooth faces, and the wheel can get cocked under load (and with a tight QR), but I've even had the brake drag after dropping the wheel to make sure it is straight. It's like I have a haunted rear brake caliper.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #39  
Old April 30th 18, 10:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,548
Default Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?

On 2018-04-30 13:02, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, April 30, 2018 at 9:24:31 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-30 08:19, jbeattie wrote:


[...]

... Did you change the housing after the failures?


No, though I did smooth the channels a little with fine-grit
sandpaper and polishing paste. Couldn't help much though because
the heads simply pulled out of the cables.

Besides, why do we as end users a.k.a. consumers have to correct
design mistakes on bicycles so often?


Most cable failures occur over time and involve breaking of
individual strands -- which should be noticed with routine
maintenance. There are housing, lever, adjuster and ferrule
designs/installations that can hasten cable failure, but a
catastrophic failure probably means a defective cable. IIRC, Shimano
did recall some cables 10+ years ago because of ends popping off.
And most of the "design" problems with other brake parts usually
result in symptoms long before the failure, like brakes that are
stiff, sticky, etc. These are usually symptoms of a cheap bike, too.

More curious tech problems: I currently have an Avid BB7 rear cable
disc on my commuter that is in housing all the way from the lever to
the caliper. I expect drag, and the return springs on the Avid
brakes are not great -- better than the first generation BB7, but
still not great. So, I expect cable drag from the housing and even
some pad drag caused by the weak return spring.


What I occasionally do is let the bike rear up against a wall, propping
it all up so it won't slide back down. Then I tie a cotton chunk around
the cable where it comes out the jacket at the rear caliper and fasten
the lever slightly pulled. Now I drip some oil on at the lever and let
that run down the cable. A few drops every hour or so, whenever I happen
to be in the garage for other reasons. Eventually the cotton ball gets
oily and then I stop and clean it up. Similar with the front brake but
then I need to lay the bike. I like to keep things nicely lubed.


What I didn't expect is that the brakes would self-tighten. It's the
oddest thing. The brakes just tighten up, and the torque arm is
fully retracted -- so its not a stuck cable. In some instances, I
think it is because the rear axle has smooth faces, and the wheel can
get cocked under load (and with a tight QR), but I've even had the
brake drag after dropping the wheel to make sure it is straight. It's
like I have a haunted rear brake caliper.


Car drum brake pads had that since a long time on some of the better
models. Decades. As the pads wore, a little "sticky cog" would be
slightly turned and that made the pads not retract as far as when they
were new. That saved a lot of frequent maintenance. I always wondered
when the bike industry would learn this but maybe the 100-year learning
curve isn't up yet :-)

At least your bike seems to have "inadvertent self-adjust".

One thing I never liked about many mechanical disc brakes is that they
only have a piston on one side. As the pads wear the rotor gets pulled
sideways more and more. They could have done a better design job.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #40  
Old May 1st 18, 12:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Default Do EVO pads fit in KoolStop holders?

On Mon, 30 Apr 2018 07:25:22 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2018-04-28 16:56, Mark J. wrote:
On 4/27/2018 3:11 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, April 27, 2018 at 2:10:07 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-27 10:57, jbeattie wrote:


[...]

... I switch between disc and direct mount caliper brakes on
the weekends and find that braking is great on both.


Thanks for the hint about the Koolstop pads. They just came. Ebay
tracking is a nice "mail is here" alert. It came early today.

They fit like a glove. I wonder why they now flare the trailing edge
inwards towards the rim. It would make the pad want to skew. Maybe I'll
grind that off.

No. It's meant to wipe the rim before the pad fully engages. It is
exactly what you want for dirt and wet weather performance.

-- Jay Beattie.


That pointy tip also makes it easy to toe in the pads an appropriate
amount to reduce squeal/judder. Once the pads are installed, if that
"tip" wears off, it's already served one useful purpose.


I don't toe in my pads anymore because that causes slightly uneven wear,
meaning less miles/pair. To heck with a little squeal.


I've always considered brake squeal a benefit when riding on a multi
user venue as people seem to react favorable to a loud shriek while
ignoring the faint "ding,ding, ding of the common bicycle bell.
--
Cheers,

John B.

 




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