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  #11  
Old August 10th 19, 04:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,105
Default Andrew

On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 7:21:12 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 3:41:31 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 9:21 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 1:23:24 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 6:10 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
Andre Jute
Economics isn't difficult: it is the commonsense activities of individuals considered in aggregate.


???

If the query is about the tagline to my sig, many economists with real life experience in business are moving away from the first two great commandments of classical economics, viz that all individuals in every market are fully informed and fully rational in every decision. That is clearly not so. We don't need to go further afield than RBT for an example.

Of course we don't go as far as Krugman, who is so Post-Modern, he's totally unmoored from reality, indeed he's unattached to anything he said yesterday or the day before, though in a few days he'll probably spout the same weirdness as he did a couple of weeks ago. In fact, he's so cyclically insane, we should make him an honorary member of RBT.

Andre Jute
Sane since I was 13. I wonder how I managed that.


Krugman is indeed unhinged and he was even before Trump
Derangement Syndrome.


I must quibble that although many individual investors are
frequently wrong, and provably so, the wisdom of crowds is a
real thing and an amazingly reliable economic indicator. Nor
infallible, but amazingly prescient usually.

I agree. However, the mob is never right. The trick is to distinguish the mob from the crowd.



Andre Jute
I can't believe the foolishness of historians who equate the French and American Revolutions. The French wanted to raise a ravening mob of murderers, the American Founding Fathers created the Electoral College and other enduring institutions specifically to defend minorities against the mob.


No one understood it better than Burke:

https://www.alibris.com/Reflections-...77?matches=601

An excellent short read and starting at just 99 cents.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Thanks, Andrew. I know it, and in fact have it (free from Project Gutenberg) on iBooks to read on my treadmill, but first I want to read Thomas Carlyle History of the French Revolution again, to which Burke makes a suitable coda. At the moment I'm working my way through Stephen Meyers Darwin's Doubt, which may be the most important book of the century so far, and Carlyle is next. He's an agreeable stylist and a meticulous historian, so I won't be rushing the pleasure.



Pffff (blowing out coffee). Darwin's Doubt the most important book of the century so far? Yikes, an ID book? One hopes for so much more from the century. Try this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/193771537X/ref=rdr_ext_tmb

-- Jay Beattie.


Ads
  #12  
Old August 10th 19, 05:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,243
Default Andrew

On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 4:16:53 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 7:21:12 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 3:41:31 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 9:21 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 1:23:24 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 6:10 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
Andre Jute
Economics isn't difficult: it is the commonsense activities of individuals considered in aggregate.


???

If the query is about the tagline to my sig, many economists with real life experience in business are moving away from the first two great commandments of classical economics, viz that all individuals in every market are fully informed and fully rational in every decision. That is clearly not so. We don't need to go further afield than RBT for an example.

Of course we don't go as far as Krugman, who is so Post-Modern, he's totally unmoored from reality, indeed he's unattached to anything he said yesterday or the day before, though in a few days he'll probably spout the same weirdness as he did a couple of weeks ago. In fact, he's so cyclically insane, we should make him an honorary member of RBT.

Andre Jute
Sane since I was 13. I wonder how I managed that.


Krugman is indeed unhinged and he was even before Trump
Derangement Syndrome.


I must quibble that although many individual investors are
frequently wrong, and provably so, the wisdom of crowds is a
real thing and an amazingly reliable economic indicator. Nor
infallible, but amazingly prescient usually.

I agree. However, the mob is never right. The trick is to distinguish the mob from the crowd.



Andre Jute
I can't believe the foolishness of historians who equate the French and American Revolutions. The French wanted to raise a ravening mob of murderers, the American Founding Fathers created the Electoral College and other enduring institutions specifically to defend minorities against the mob.


No one understood it better than Burke:

https://www.alibris.com/Reflections-...77?matches=601

An excellent short read and starting at just 99 cents.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Thanks, Andrew. I know it, and in fact have it (free from Project Gutenberg) on iBooks to read on my treadmill, but first I want to read Thomas Carlyle History of the French Revolution again, to which Burke makes a suitable coda. At the moment I'm working my way through Stephen Meyers Darwin's Doubt, which may be the most important book of the century so far, and Carlyle is next. He's an agreeable stylist and a meticulous historian, so I won't be rushing the pleasure.



Pffff (blowing out coffee). Darwin's Doubt the most important book of the century so far?


The only thing more important than where we came from is where we're going. Any ideas?

Yikes, an ID book?


Have you actually read it? I haven't finished it but I'm far enough to know that his dissection of all the other theories is fair-minded and persausive.

One hopes for so much more from the century.


Which I why I added the qualification "so far".

Andre Jute
Those who do not study history are condemned to repeat it



Try this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/193771537X/ref=rdr_ext_tmb

-- Jay Beattie.

  #13  
Old August 10th 19, 05:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,625
Default Andrew

On 8/10/2019 10:16 AM, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 7:21:12 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 3:41:31 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 9:21 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 1:23:24 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 6:10 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
Andre Jute
Economics isn't difficult: it is the commonsense activities of individuals considered in aggregate.


???

If the query is about the tagline to my sig, many economists with real life experience in business are moving away from the first two great commandments of classical economics, viz that all individuals in every market are fully informed and fully rational in every decision. That is clearly not so. We don't need to go further afield than RBT for an example.

Of course we don't go as far as Krugman, who is so Post-Modern, he's totally unmoored from reality, indeed he's unattached to anything he said yesterday or the day before, though in a few days he'll probably spout the same weirdness as he did a couple of weeks ago. In fact, he's so cyclically insane, we should make him an honorary member of RBT.

Andre Jute
Sane since I was 13. I wonder how I managed that.


Krugman is indeed unhinged and he was even before Trump
Derangement Syndrome.


I must quibble that although many individual investors are
frequently wrong, and provably so, the wisdom of crowds is a
real thing and an amazingly reliable economic indicator. Nor
infallible, but amazingly prescient usually.

I agree. However, the mob is never right. The trick is to distinguish the mob from the crowd.



Andre Jute
I can't believe the foolishness of historians who equate the French and American Revolutions. The French wanted to raise a ravening mob of murderers, the American Founding Fathers created the Electoral College and other enduring institutions specifically to defend minorities against the mob.


No one understood it better than Burke:

https://www.alibris.com/Reflections-...77?matches=601

An excellent short read and starting at just 99 cents.


Thanks, Andrew. I know it, and in fact have it (free from Project Gutenberg) on iBooks to read on my treadmill, but first I want to read Thomas Carlyle History of the French Revolution again, to which Burke makes a suitable coda. At the moment I'm working my way through Stephen Meyers Darwin's Doubt, which may be the most important book of the century so far, and Carlyle is next. He's an agreeable stylist and a meticulous historian, so I won't be rushing the pleasure.



Pffff (blowing out coffee). Darwin's Doubt the most important book of the century so far? Yikes, an ID book? One hopes for so much more from the century. Try this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/193771537X/ref=rdr_ext_tmb

-- Jay Beattie.



Not a bad choice though I might suggest Jobst Brandt instead.

I'm currently reading de Jasay's collected works; astounding
insight and clarity. Underappreciated thinker IMHO.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #14  
Old August 10th 19, 05:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,243
Default Andrew

On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 4:16:53 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:

Try this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/193771537X/ref=rdr_ext_tmb

-- Jay Beattie.


Thanks the same, Jay. but my bike is so well developed it only requires service once a year, five minutes' worth of work to change the oil in the gearbox. I also check the air in the tyres every second month. I leave daily services and other shenanigans requiring manuals of neddie instructions to roadies.

Andre Jute
Get a Rohloff!




  #15  
Old August 10th 19, 05:45 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,105
Default Andrew

On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 9:01:33 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 4:16:53 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 7:21:12 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 3:41:31 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 9:21 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 1:23:24 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 6:10 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
Andre Jute
Economics isn't difficult: it is the commonsense activities of individuals considered in aggregate.


???

If the query is about the tagline to my sig, many economists with real life experience in business are moving away from the first two great commandments of classical economics, viz that all individuals in every market are fully informed and fully rational in every decision. That is clearly not so. We don't need to go further afield than RBT for an example.

Of course we don't go as far as Krugman, who is so Post-Modern, he's totally unmoored from reality, indeed he's unattached to anything he said yesterday or the day before, though in a few days he'll probably spout the same weirdness as he did a couple of weeks ago. In fact, he's so cyclically insane, we should make him an honorary member of RBT.

Andre Jute
Sane since I was 13. I wonder how I managed that.


Krugman is indeed unhinged and he was even before Trump
Derangement Syndrome.


I must quibble that although many individual investors are
frequently wrong, and provably so, the wisdom of crowds is a
real thing and an amazingly reliable economic indicator. Nor
infallible, but amazingly prescient usually.

I agree. However, the mob is never right. The trick is to distinguish the mob from the crowd.



Andre Jute
I can't believe the foolishness of historians who equate the French and American Revolutions. The French wanted to raise a ravening mob of murderers, the American Founding Fathers created the Electoral College and other enduring institutions specifically to defend minorities against the mob.


No one understood it better than Burke:

https://www.alibris.com/Reflections-...77?matches=601

An excellent short read and starting at just 99 cents.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Thanks, Andrew. I know it, and in fact have it (free from Project Gutenberg) on iBooks to read on my treadmill, but first I want to read Thomas Carlyle History of the French Revolution again, to which Burke makes a suitable coda. At the moment I'm working my way through Stephen Meyers Darwin's Doubt, which may be the most important book of the century so far, and Carlyle is next. He's an agreeable stylist and a meticulous historian, so I won't be rushing the pleasure.



Pffff (blowing out coffee). Darwin's Doubt the most important book of the century so far?


The only thing more important than where we came from is where we're going. Any ideas?

Yikes, an ID book?


Have you actually read it? I haven't finished it but I'm far enough to know that his dissection of all the other theories is fair-minded and persausive.


No, I've only read the reviews -- and I will admit my prejudices, which a (1) whenever I finish a book that involves religion or philosophy chasing science, or vice versa, I feel like I've wasted my time. The book may illuminate some current controversy, but that controversy is usually gone in ten years or has mutated like a virus into a different controversy. It started out as creationism, mutated into intelligent design and will be something different in five years -- maybe go back to ancient astronauts or the Illuminati. Meanwhile, the actual scientific community plods along with evolution. One hopes for primary work that really proves something rather than a curated, retrospective review of prior research with a new gloss. (2) I'm not against God or intelligent design, but really, if you were an all-powerful God, would you create a Trilobite? Why not a dog or a Swedish bikini model. The God envisioned by these people is so lame.

-- Jay Beattie.

  #16  
Old August 10th 19, 06:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,625
Default Andrew

On 8/10/2019 11:45 AM, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 9:01:33 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 4:16:53 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 7:21:12 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 3:41:31 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 9:21 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 1:23:24 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 6:10 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
Andre Jute
Economics isn't difficult: it is the commonsense activities of individuals considered in aggregate.


???

If the query is about the tagline to my sig, many economists with real life experience in business are moving away from the first two great commandments of classical economics, viz that all individuals in every market are fully informed and fully rational in every decision. That is clearly not so. We don't need to go further afield than RBT for an example.

Of course we don't go as far as Krugman, who is so Post-Modern, he's totally unmoored from reality, indeed he's unattached to anything he said yesterday or the day before, though in a few days he'll probably spout the same weirdness as he did a couple of weeks ago. In fact, he's so cyclically insane, we should make him an honorary member of RBT.

Andre Jute
Sane since I was 13. I wonder how I managed that.


Krugman is indeed unhinged and he was even before Trump
Derangement Syndrome.


I must quibble that although many individual investors are
frequently wrong, and provably so, the wisdom of crowds is a
real thing and an amazingly reliable economic indicator. Nor
infallible, but amazingly prescient usually.

I agree. However, the mob is never right. The trick is to distinguish the mob from the crowd.



Andre Jute
I can't believe the foolishness of historians who equate the French and American Revolutions. The French wanted to raise a ravening mob of murderers, the American Founding Fathers created the Electoral College and other enduring institutions specifically to defend minorities against the mob.


No one understood it better than Burke:

https://www.alibris.com/Reflections-...77?matches=601

An excellent short read and starting at just 99 cents.


Thanks, Andrew. I know it, and in fact have it (free from Project Gutenberg) on iBooks to read on my treadmill, but first I want to read Thomas Carlyle History of the French Revolution again, to which Burke makes a suitable coda. At the moment I'm working my way through Stephen Meyers Darwin's Doubt, which may be the most important book of the century so far, and Carlyle is next. He's an agreeable stylist and a meticulous historian, so I won't be rushing the pleasure.


Pffff (blowing out coffee). Darwin's Doubt the most important book of the century so far?


The only thing more important than where we came from is where we're going. Any ideas?

Yikes, an ID book?


Have you actually read it? I haven't finished it but I'm far enough to know that his dissection of all the other theories is fair-minded and persausive.


No, I've only read the reviews -- and I will admit my prejudices, which a (1) whenever I finish a book that involves religion or philosophy chasing science, or vice versa, I feel like I've wasted my time. The book may illuminate some current controversy, but that controversy is usually gone in ten years or has mutated like a virus into a different controversy. It started out as creationism, mutated into intelligent design and will be something different in five years -- maybe go back to ancient astronauts or the Illuminati. Meanwhile, the actual scientific community plods along with evolution. One hopes for primary work that really proves something rather than a curated, retrospective review of prior research with a new gloss. (2) I'm not against God or intelligent design, but really, if you were an all-powerful God, would you create a Trilobite? Why not a dog or a Swedish bikini model. The God envisioned by these people is so lame.

-- Jay Beattie.


You never know perhaps prophecy is fulfilled in our time:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...tic-scene.html

Ancient astronauts merely graffitied the Altacama and built
a few pyramids to sharpen their razor blades. Meh.


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #17  
Old August 10th 19, 07:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 621
Default Andrew

On Friday, August 9, 2019 at 5:28:13 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 6:26 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, August 9, 2019 at 3:05:11 PM UTC-7, James wrote:
On 10/8/19 7:33 am, AMuzi wrote:


???

A current Chorus 12 set is about the same price as the equivalent Dura
Ace 11 speed set. Campagnolo doesn't make a Tourney or Claris equivalent
product.


And as it is known, the Campagnolo gear wears in while the other stuff
wears out ;-)


There are a number of aspects of the others offerings that I dislike and
I would rather Chorus than Dura Ace.


--
JS


James, I ride Record with the occasional Chorus piece when a Record part is unavailable. But I put together and ride Shimano bikes as well. I will tell you flat out that Shimano shifts better and remains shifting better over its lifetime. And if you're careful to keep it clean that is a hell of a long time.

Campy starts wearing the shifting ratchet from day one and by the end of a year or two it is constantly making noise shifts up and down. Moreover after they start a new series they do not make repair parts for the older groups. Some small companies make a living of buying up repair components and making a profit on them after a couple of years.

You cannot even get a Record triple any more. Since Campy isn't supposed to shift larger than a 28 cog (29 is stretching it) a triple was good for people incapable of riding up steep hills. I even was given a 28 and 26 ring for use on a Record Triple.

I appear to be getting in shape finally after a bad start of the year, so I am climbing pretty hard stuff in the 34-28 but why would you cast aside an entire group of people to appeal to the Snob Set?

With an Ultegra group you can make many more choices of gear ratios double and triple. And as I said, the shifting is so much better I can't understand why Campy couldn't get it right.



Uh, current Campagnolo 2x12 and 2x11 support the standard
11~32 cassette.

Ergo have not been rebuildable since 2007 but Ergo bodies
change out quickly and are not at all expensive as compared
to rebuild labor plus normal wearing parts on the steel-cam
1992 through 2006 versions.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I could have added that but I was speaking about 10 and 11 speed. I have already but rebuild bodies on my shifters and I agree that they are cheap and effective. But my concern is how long they will be available.
  #18  
Old August 10th 19, 07:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 621
Default Andrew

On Friday, August 9, 2019 at 10:31:23 PM UTC-7, James wrote:
On 10/8/19 10:28 am, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 6:26 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, August 9, 2019 at 3:05:11 PM UTC-7, James wrote:
On 10/8/19 7:33 am, AMuzi wrote:


???

A current Chorus 12 set is about the same price as the equivalent Dura
Ace 11 speed set. Campagnolo doesn't make a Tourney or Claris
equivalent
product.


And as it is known, the Campagnolo gear wears in while the other stuff
wears outÂ* ;-)


There are a number of aspects of the others offerings that I dislike and
I would rather Chorus than Dura Ace.


--
JS

James, I ride Record with the occasional Chorus piece when a Record
part is unavailable. But I put together and ride Shimano bikes as
well. I will tell you flat out that Shimano shifts better and remains
shifting better over its lifetime. And if you're careful to keep it
clean that is a hell of a long time.

Campy starts wearing the shifting ratchet from day one and by the end
of a year or two it is constantly making noise shifts up and down.
Moreover after they start a new series they do not make repair parts
for the older groups. Some small companies make a living of buying up
repair components and making a profit on them after a couple of years.

You cannot even get a Record triple any more. Since Campy isn't
supposed to shift larger than a 28 cog (29 is stretching it) a triple
was good for people incapable of riding up steep hills. I even was
given a 28 and 26 ring for use on a Record Triple.

I appear to be getting in shape finally after a bad start of the year,
so I am climbing pretty hard stuff in the 34-28 but why would you cast
aside an entire group of people to appeal to the Snob Set?

With an Ultegra group you can make many more choices of gear ratios
double and triple. And as I said, the shifting is so much better I
can't understand why Campy couldn't get it right.



Uh, current Campagnolo 2x12 and 2x11 support the standard 11~32 cassette.

Ergo have not been rebuildable since 2007 but Ergo bodies change out
quickly and are not at all expensive as compared to rebuild labor plus
normal wearing parts on the steel-cam 1992 through 2006 versions.



And there is a triple available in some of the cheaper groups?

https://www.campagnolo.com/AU/en/Cam...aur_and_veloce

A Centaur 10s triple would be awesome to replace the Shimano Sora 9s
that came with my gravel tourer.

--
JS


If you're willing to change your manner of shifting. The paddle shifts up in one and down in the other. Centaur is a good group - sort of 105ish - all of the good parts of the upper level parts but a bit heavier. On a touring bike that is certainly no handicap.
  #19  
Old August 10th 19, 08:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 621
Default Andrew

On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 9:45:45 AM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 9:01:33 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 4:16:53 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 7:21:12 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 3:41:31 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 9:21 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 1:23:24 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 6:10 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
Andre Jute
Economics isn't difficult: it is the commonsense activities of individuals considered in aggregate.


???

If the query is about the tagline to my sig, many economists with real life experience in business are moving away from the first two great commandments of classical economics, viz that all individuals in every market are fully informed and fully rational in every decision. That is clearly not so. We don't need to go further afield than RBT for an example.

Of course we don't go as far as Krugman, who is so Post-Modern, he's totally unmoored from reality, indeed he's unattached to anything he said yesterday or the day before, though in a few days he'll probably spout the same weirdness as he did a couple of weeks ago. In fact, he's so cyclically insane, we should make him an honorary member of RBT.

Andre Jute
Sane since I was 13. I wonder how I managed that.


Krugman is indeed unhinged and he was even before Trump
Derangement Syndrome.


I must quibble that although many individual investors are
frequently wrong, and provably so, the wisdom of crowds is a
real thing and an amazingly reliable economic indicator. Nor
infallible, but amazingly prescient usually.

I agree. However, the mob is never right. The trick is to distinguish the mob from the crowd.



Andre Jute
I can't believe the foolishness of historians who equate the French and American Revolutions. The French wanted to raise a ravening mob of murderers, the American Founding Fathers created the Electoral College and other enduring institutions specifically to defend minorities against the mob.


No one understood it better than Burke:

https://www.alibris.com/Reflections-...77?matches=601

An excellent short read and starting at just 99 cents.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Thanks, Andrew. I know it, and in fact have it (free from Project Gutenberg) on iBooks to read on my treadmill, but first I want to read Thomas Carlyle History of the French Revolution again, to which Burke makes a suitable coda. At the moment I'm working my way through Stephen Meyers Darwin's Doubt, which may be the most important book of the century so far, and Carlyle is next. He's an agreeable stylist and a meticulous historian, so I won't be rushing the pleasure.


Pffff (blowing out coffee). Darwin's Doubt the most important book of the century so far?


The only thing more important than where we came from is where we're going. Any ideas?

Yikes, an ID book?


Have you actually read it? I haven't finished it but I'm far enough to know that his dissection of all the other theories is fair-minded and persausive.


No, I've only read the reviews -- and I will admit my prejudices, which a (1) whenever I finish a book that involves religion or philosophy chasing science, or vice versa, I feel like I've wasted my time. The book may illuminate some current controversy, but that controversy is usually gone in ten years or has mutated like a virus into a different controversy. It started out as creationism, mutated into intelligent design and will be something different in five years -- maybe go back to ancient astronauts or the Illuminati. Meanwhile, the actual scientific community plods along with evolution. One hopes for primary work that really proves something rather than a curated, retrospective review of prior research with a new gloss. (2) I'm not against God or intelligent design, but really, if you were an all-powerful God, would you create a Trilobite? Why not a dog or a Swedish bikini model. The God envisioned by these people is so lame.

-- Jay Beattie.


Jay, I don't think that you realize the problems with Darwin. While improvement of the species certainly is possible in the time since Darwin we have never witnessed speciation due to evolution.

Just the human genome itself would require about several thousand mutations per second since life first appeared on Earth to have reached the present point of development. The numbers are simply far too large for Darwin's theories to ever work on the large scale necessary.

So you can either believe that the impossible happened or that there was intelligent design behind it.
  #20  
Old August 10th 19, 08:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,625
Default Andrew

On 8/10/2019 1:55 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, August 9, 2019 at 10:31:23 PM UTC-7, James wrote:
On 10/8/19 10:28 am, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 6:26 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, August 9, 2019 at 3:05:11 PM UTC-7, James wrote:
On 10/8/19 7:33 am, AMuzi wrote:


???

A current Chorus 12 set is about the same price as the equivalent Dura
Ace 11 speed set. Campagnolo doesn't make a Tourney or Claris
equivalent
product.


And as it is known, the Campagnolo gear wears in while the other stuff
wears out ;-)


There are a number of aspects of the others offerings that I dislike and
I would rather Chorus than Dura Ace.


--
JS

James, I ride Record with the occasional Chorus piece when a Record
part is unavailable. But I put together and ride Shimano bikes as
well. I will tell you flat out that Shimano shifts better and remains
shifting better over its lifetime. And if you're careful to keep it
clean that is a hell of a long time.

Campy starts wearing the shifting ratchet from day one and by the end
of a year or two it is constantly making noise shifts up and down.
Moreover after they start a new series they do not make repair parts
for the older groups. Some small companies make a living of buying up
repair components and making a profit on them after a couple of years.

You cannot even get a Record triple any more. Since Campy isn't
supposed to shift larger than a 28 cog (29 is stretching it) a triple
was good for people incapable of riding up steep hills. I even was
given a 28 and 26 ring for use on a Record Triple.

I appear to be getting in shape finally after a bad start of the year,
so I am climbing pretty hard stuff in the 34-28 but why would you cast
aside an entire group of people to appeal to the Snob Set?

With an Ultegra group you can make many more choices of gear ratios
double and triple. And as I said, the shifting is so much better I
can't understand why Campy couldn't get it right.



Uh, current Campagnolo 2x12 and 2x11 support the standard 11~32 cassette.

Ergo have not been rebuildable since 2007 but Ergo bodies change out
quickly and are not at all expensive as compared to rebuild labor plus
normal wearing parts on the steel-cam 1992 through 2006 versions.



And there is a triple available in some of the cheaper groups?

https://www.campagnolo.com/AU/en/Cam...aur_and_veloce

A Centaur 10s triple would be awesome to replace the Shimano Sora 9s
that came with my gravel tourer.

--
JS


If you're willing to change your manner of shifting. The paddle shifts up in one and down in the other. Centaur is a good group - sort of 105ish - all of the good parts of the upper level parts but a bit heavier. On a touring bike that is certainly no handicap.


For a few annoying technical reasons I'd skip the current
Centaur 11 and pay a few $$ extra for Potenza. Nice system.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


 




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