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EICHE Top Sprinter. Trying to determine value, age and trueorigin



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 18th 15, 08:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Jakob Krieger
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Posts: 145
Default EICHE Top Sprinter. Trying to determine value, age and trueorigin

- fairbornCCF / Wed, 15 Jul 2015 15:25:14 +0200

Not sure the age of this bicycle. Could not find any information on
the internet.


https://goo.gl/photos/v3vFAEAZ97xQ4A8P6


This is from a small German manufacturer which does not exist any more
(»Eiche« means »oak tree«). Names with somehow patriotic sound
have been quite common in Germany (not in Switzerland or Austria).

The making and parts date to early 1970s.

The »racing« handlebar probably was added later.

This type was categorized »men's sports bike«
(between tourers and racing-bies).


There is a little town named Eiche near Berlin, and in ads,
pre-war bikes of this name are located near Berlin,
post-war Eiche bikes in the Dortmund region.

So probably the manufacurer moved out of the soviet zone
(which became GDR / DDR later) and settled near Dortmund.


Such bikes are robust, specially the frames are done with
a lot of work-intensive details like soldered sockets for
frame-tubes.

There are plenty still existing, and collectors don't
care for the 1970s yet, so there is little commercial value.



jk


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  #2  
Old October 19th 15, 02:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
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Posts: 2,202
Default EICHE Top Sprinter. Trying to determine value, age and true origin


A lovely bike.

How many speeds did it have and, if it is your bike, what do the two
decals on the seat tube say?



On Sun, 18 Oct 2015 21:17:22 +0200, "Jakob Krieger"
wrote:

- fairbornCCF / Wed, 15 Jul 2015 15:25:14 +0200

Not sure the age of this bicycle. Could not find any information on
the internet.


https://goo.gl/photos/v3vFAEAZ97xQ4A8P6


This is from a small German manufacturer which does not exist any more
(Eiche means oak tree). Names with somehow patriotic sound
have been quite common in Germany (not in Switzerland or Austria).

The making and parts date to early 1970s.

The racing handlebar probably was added later.

This type was categorized men's sports bike
(between tourers and racing-bies).


There is a little town named Eiche near Berlin, and in ads,
pre-war bikes of this name are located near Berlin,
post-war Eiche bikes in the Dortmund region.

So probably the manufacurer moved out of the soviet zone
(which became GDR / DDR later) and settled near Dortmund.


Such bikes are robust, specially the frames are done with
a lot of work-intensive details like soldered sockets for
frame-tubes.

There are plenty still existing, and collectors don't
care for the 1970s yet, so there is little commercial value.



jk

--
cheers,

John B.

  #3  
Old October 19th 15, 02:41 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Jakob Krieger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 145
Default EICHE Top Sprinter. Trying to determine value, age and trueorigin

- John B. / Mon, 19 Oct 2015 03:01:34 +0200

A lovely bike.


True.

How many speeds did it have and, if it is your bike, what do the two
decals on the seat tube say?


It is not mine,
but such bikes at this time had 5-gear shift.
Racers hat 10 (2 * 5). Sprocket-sets with 6 or more
and triple chain-blades were introduced by Shimano about 1980.


The thing mounted to the seat tube is strange. Never seen before.


jk



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  #4  
Old October 19th 15, 12:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B.[_6_]
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Posts: 2,202
Default EICHE Top Sprinter. Trying to determine value, age and true origin

On Mon, 19 Oct 2015 03:41:48 +0200, "Jakob Krieger"
wrote:

- John B. / Mon, 19 Oct 2015 03:01:34 +0200

A lovely bike.


True.

How many speeds did it have and, if it is your bike, what do the two
decals on the seat tube say?


It is not mine,
but such bikes at this time had 5-gear shift.
Racers hat 10 (2 * 5). Sprocket-sets with 6 or more
and triple chain-blades were introduced by Shimano about 1980.


The thing mounted to the seat tube is strange. Never seen before.


jk


I was interested in the number of rear sprockets as the bike has a
chain guard and it seems to be the common opinion here that bicycles
with a number of sprockets on the rear CANNOT have a chain guard....
and there is a bicycle that has one :-)

I didn't mean the green bicycle lock chains and cable I was talking
about the two decals on the seat tube. the one at the top I can almost
read and the red one at the bottom I can't read at all. I suspect that
the top one might be a label for the steel tubes used, in which case
it is likely, at least for the time, a very well made frame.
--
cheers,

John B.

  #5  
Old October 19th 15, 12:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Jakob Krieger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 145
Default EICHE Top Sprinter. Trying to determine value, age and trueorigin

- John B. / Mon, 19 Oct 2015 13:04:02 +0200


I was interested in the number of rear sprockets as the bike has a
chain guard and it seems to be the common opinion here that bicycles
with a number of sprockets on the rear CANNOT have a chain guard....
and there is a bicycle that has one :-)


http://www.scheunenfun.de/f+s_torpedo_kettenschaltung.htm

On this link, there is a very old 3-gear chain shift.
You also can see the winged axle nuts.

Of course, on the picture it is hard to identify the brand
(»Torpedo« was a brand by Fichtel & Sachs, a company that
stopped building bike parts when Shimano came with cheap
but reliable products; their patents were bought by SRAM).


As parts like the headlight, the rear rack, the chain guard,
the break arms, and the fenders look like early 1970s style,
the shift will probably be 5-gear (was common at that time).

Most non-racing bikes of that time had 3-gear hub-shifts;
chain-shift was the more 'sporty' variant.

http://www.scheunenfun.de/f+s_modell515.htm

The combination of sprocket shift and chain guard is possible,
even today it can be found on bikes from the Netherlands.

People preferred to have the chain easy to access (because
early chain shifts were less reliable than today's), and they
didn't like the »grandpa-style« chain protectors. So they
came out of use (of course, never would be screwed on a racer
or a MTB)


I didn't mean the green bicycle lock chains and cable ...


Sorry, I was detracted by the thing mounted right under the seat
(might be a trailer hitch?).

... I was talking
about the two decals on the seat tube. the one at the top I can almost
read and the red one at the bottom I can't read at all.


The silver writing of the upper one reads »Garantie« / warranty -
kind of a quality badge.
The lower red one probably contains the frame number.
The letters on top of the red badge might be »Eiche«.



I suspect that
the top one might be a label for the steel tubes used, in which case
it is likely, at least for the time, a very well made frame.


It was common to say something like »high quality steel«, not the
exact type used (I don't know when numbers like »EN 10305-1«
or »EN 10305-4« were introduced).

But it is hand-made with big precision for sure. Bikes were quite
expensive at that time. The invasion of DIY-market crap bikes
(which looked somehow more modern) came up in the 1980s.
Many bike manufacturers closed down then.


jk



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