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  #21  
Old November 26th 17, 06:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 9:03:32 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-25 16:30, wrote:

goo.gl/CshRPR

assuming your superior healthy is an error ...



It isn't an error.


... around you people are not...

the 'satellite city' boom grew more high towers

I assume one n 2 stories are cheaper

nice photo couldn't find a view north of NYC

http://mossien.com/wp-content/upload...chester_NY.jpg


No ten horses would get me to live there.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


no no no the local pop's health. who gives a damn abt your health.
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  #22  
Old November 26th 17, 06:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,607
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On 2017-11-26 09:48, wrote:
On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 9:03:32 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-25 16:30,
wrote:

goo.gl/CshRPR

assuming your superior healthy is an error ...



It isn't an error.


... around you people are not...

the 'satellite city' boom grew more high towers

I assume one n 2 stories are cheaper

nice photo couldn't find a view north of NYC

http://mossien.com/wp-content/upload...chester_NY.jpg


No ten horses would get me to live there.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


no no no the local pop's health. who gives a damn abt your health.


I do. If someone choses to smoke which rural folks often do that isn't
my problem, it's theirs.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #23  
Old November 26th 17, 09:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,483
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On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 9:45:53 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-26 09:30, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 8:07:32 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-26 07:18, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/25/2017 3:05 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-25 12:51, wrote:
On Saturday, November 25, 2017 at 1:48:06 PM UTC-7,
wrote:
the foil joke may prevent you from arranging with/into
your environment

try this ... if foil was a component then why not .... ?

J this is an older German architectural/psych concept:
terracotta buildings are healthier than steel reinforced
concrete ...a much larger off the ground scale

I cannot locate current info on the net


Steel re-enforced in most cases means some big residential
highrise in a congested area. No wonder that those people are
or feel less healthy. I have never understood the desire of
city folk to cram together like sardines in a can.


Try an intro Anthropology book some time. Before The Inter Webs,
close proximity promoted exchange of ideas and specialization of
effort. Still does to some extent.


It does, though specialization is not always a good thing. It
results, for example, in people who can't even fix a flat. Their
tool of fixing just about anything is the yellow pages.


Fixing a flat IS specialization, particularly a tubular. Are you
saying the rugged individualists in Cameron Park -- a golf community
with an airstrip -- are more likely to fix their own flats than the
downtrodden city dwellers in, say, Portland or Minneapolis?


Probably yes. For example, the folks in the airpark almost always have a
very well equipped hangar-size garage with huge tool chests. Many also
have certificates entitling them to officially repair aircraft. If you
can fix a leaking tire on an aircraft you can fix it on a bicycle.


Do the airplane guys even own bikes?
http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/O...al-2522165.php It seems like the idea is to burn fuel.

I probably see one-hundred times the cyclists you see on a daily basis. I can guaranty you that all of them know how to fix a flat. https://bikeportland.org/2016/05/04/...o-essay-182506 These are ordinary city dwellers who actually ride and who account for an appreciable share of traffic. They also do super-gnarly weekend rides where they get to jump in puddles and drink beer!

BTW, I was flying with my brother yesterday in one of his planes. He doesn't work on that plane because it has a RR jet turbine engine -- not something for the home mechanic. He does have a Trek city bike with flat tires in his garage, but I'm confident that the can pump those up -- even though he is a city dweller who lives in a condo tower.



As for health, dense living results in lot of civilization
diseases, higher stress levels and nowadays lung diseases because
of pollution. Probably also more cancer. Just about every time I
reach the top of the last hill to ride into the Sacramento Valley I
see that brownish smog line and I am thankful not to have to live
down there. Other times I can literally smell it.


And yet, you're headed to Sacramento to get goods and services
lacking in Cameron Park -- which is not surprising, since it was
designed as a parasitic bedroom community carved out of a
cow-pasture/vinyard. Rugged individualists with cars and strip
malls.


No, I take my pick. Often, like two days ago, I point the MTB east and
go to the Placerville area. They've got hardware stores and just about
everything needed. I never ride into Sacramento for errands, if west I
go to Folsom. I like to patronize their businesses because that
community did and does a stellar job for cycling infrastructure. That
needs to be rewarded. As long as you don't ride much past Rancho Cordova
the smell of smog won't intensify too badly. Plus you are far off car
traffic because it is a bikle path separated so far that all you usually
see is river and nature.


BTW, rural populations typically fare worse in terms of physical and
mental health.
https://hpi.georgetown.edu/agingsoci...ral/rural.html



That is largely because of the much higher percentage of people with
longterm substance abuse problems, and most of all smoking. If you live
a healthy lifestyle country living is way better for you.


Since when is Cameron Park "country living." It's a f***** synthetic community built around a golf course within commuting distance of SAC. It's a commuter suburb. It's everything bad about land use and planning in California. It's a virus. I'd be ashamed to live there. You should move to a real town -- maybe Hurricane, UT or some other moonscape where the rugged individuals know how to fix a flat!


Also, with all the wood stove burning and automobiles in Cameron
Park, you'd have smog too if the town were in a valley, like
Sacramento.


We don't. Except on very cold days for the occasional expression
censored who are too incompetent to operate a wood stove.

When I worked in Rancho Cordova (Sacramento Valley) I could sometimes
feel the pollution in my lungs. Coming up the Bass Lake Grade I rolled
down the windows "Aaaah, finally fresh air". No that I don't have to
commute anymore I get fresh air all the time.


I get fresh air all the time, too, except where there are forest fires. In fact, my air quality is better than yours:

My zip: https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?act...19&s ubmit=Go ("Good")

Your zip: https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?act...62&s ubmit=Go ("Moderate")

Gads! I'd stay indoors if I were you!

-- Jay Beattie.
  #24  
Old November 26th 17, 10:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,607
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On 2017-11-26 12:11, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 9:45:53 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-26 09:30, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 8:07:32 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-26 07:18, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/25/2017 3:05 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-25 12:51, wrote:
On Saturday, November 25, 2017 at 1:48:06 PM UTC-7,
wrote:
the foil joke may prevent you from arranging with/into
your environment

try this ... if foil was a component then why not ....
?

J this is an older German architectural/psych concept:
terracotta buildings are healthier than steel reinforced
concrete ...a much larger off the ground scale

I cannot locate current info on the net


Steel re-enforced in most cases means some big residential
highrise in a congested area. No wonder that those people
are or feel less healthy. I have never understood the
desire of city folk to cram together like sardines in a
can.


Try an intro Anthropology book some time. Before The Inter
Webs, close proximity promoted exchange of ideas and
specialization of effort. Still does to some extent.


It does, though specialization is not always a good thing. It
results, for example, in people who can't even fix a flat.
Their tool of fixing just about anything is the yellow pages.

Fixing a flat IS specialization, particularly a tubular. Are you
saying the rugged individualists in Cameron Park -- a golf
community with an airstrip -- are more likely to fix their own
flats than the downtrodden city dwellers in, say, Portland or
Minneapolis?


Probably yes. For example, the folks in the airpark almost always
have a very well equipped hangar-size garage with huge tool chests.
Many also have certificates entitling them to officially repair
aircraft. If you can fix a leaking tire on an aircraft you can fix
it on a bicycle.


Do the airplane guys even own bikes?
http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/O...al-2522165.php
It seems like the idea is to burn fuel.


Many have bikes in their large garages. Not that they ride any more than
many of the other garage queen owners but for sure they'd know how to
fix it.


I probably see one-hundred times the cyclists you see on a daily
basis. I can guaranty you that all of them know how to fix a flat.



I have personally met several who didn't (and I fixed it for them).


https://bikeportland.org/2016/05/04/...o-essay-182506



Wow, the helmet quota is even higher than here where it's already well
over 95%.


These are ordinary city dwellers who actually ride and who account
for an appreciable share of traffic. They also do super-gnarly
weekend rides where they get to jump in puddles and drink beer!

BTW, I was flying with my brother yesterday in one of his planes. He
doesn't work on that plane because it has a RR jet turbine engine --
not something for the home mechanic.



No, and he must be super rich if that's just one of his planes. Attorney?


... He does have a Trek city bike
with flat tires in his garage, but I'm confident that the can pump
those up -- even though he is a city dweller who lives in a condo
tower.


Different story. This is about the ability to fix a defect that isn't
just lack of air.


As for health, dense living results in lot of civilization
diseases, higher stress levels and nowadays lung diseases
because of pollution. Probably also more cancer. Just about
every time I reach the top of the last hill to ride into the
Sacramento Valley I see that brownish smog line and I am
thankful not to have to live down there. Other times I can
literally smell it.

And yet, you're headed to Sacramento to get goods and services
lacking in Cameron Park -- which is not surprising, since it was
designed as a parasitic bedroom community carved out of a
cow-pasture/vinyard. Rugged individualists with cars and strip
malls.


No, I take my pick. Often, like two days ago, I point the MTB east
and go to the Placerville area. They've got hardware stores and
just about everything needed. I never ride into Sacramento for
errands, if west I go to Folsom. I like to patronize their
businesses because that community did and does a stellar job for
cycling infrastructure. That needs to be rewarded. As long as you
don't ride much past Rancho Cordova the smell of smog won't
intensify too badly. Plus you are far off car traffic because it is
a bikle path separated so far that all you usually see is river and
nature.


BTW, rural populations typically fare worse in terms of physical
and mental health.
https://hpi.georgetown.edu/agingsoci...ral/rural.html



That is largely because of the much higher percentage of people
with longterm substance abuse problems, and most of all smoking. If
you live a healthy lifestyle country living is way better for you.


Since when is Cameron Park "country living."



Since pretty much forever:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfqa_fXf-DE


... It's a f***** synthetic
community built around a golf course within commuting distance of
SAC. It's a commuter suburb. It's everything bad about land use and
planning in California. It's a virus. I'd be ashamed to live there.
You should move to a real town -- maybe Hurricane, UT or some other
moonscape where the rugged individuals know how to fix a flat!



Hurricane is precisely one of the areas on our radar for a potential
retirement move. St.George is too large for me but the surrounding
places are nice.


Also, with all the wood stove burning and automobiles in Cameron
Park, you'd have smog too if the town were in a valley, like
Sacramento.


We don't. Except on very cold days for the occasional expression
censored who are too incompetent to operate a wood stove.

When I worked in Rancho Cordova (Sacramento Valley) I could
sometimes feel the pollution in my lungs. Coming up the Bass Lake
Grade I rolled down the windows "Aaaah, finally fresh air". No that
I don't have to commute anymore I get fresh air all the time.


I get fresh air all the time, too, except where there are forest
fires. In fact, my air quality is better than yours:

My zip:
https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?act...19&s ubmit=Go
("Good")

Your zip:
https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?act...62&s ubmit=Go
("Moderate")

Gads! I'd stay indoors if I were you!


There is still some fire smell in the air. Remember that we had some big
ones? It was on the news.

Portland is too rainy and cold for us. Also, when moving for retirement
I'll make 110% sure we won't get into another liberal state. Which is
why California would be out for that purpose and so is Oregon. Now Idaho
would be nice but too cold for my wife.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #25  
Old November 27th 17, 01:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default FLU

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 08:07:27 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-26 07:18, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/25/2017 3:05 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-25 12:51, wrote:
On Saturday, November 25, 2017 at 1:48:06 PM UTC-7,

wrote:
the foil joke may prevent you from arranging with/into your
environment

try this ... if foil was a component then why not .... ?

J this is an older German architectural/psych concept:
terracotta
buildings are healthier than steel reinforced concrete
...a much
larger off the ground scale

I cannot locate current info on the net


Steel re-enforced in most cases means some big residential
highrise in a congested area. No wonder that those people
are or feel less healthy. I have never understood the desire
of city folk to cram together like sardines in a can.


Try an intro Anthropology book some time.
Before The Inter Webs, close proximity promoted exchange of ideas and
specialization of effort. Still does to some extent.


It does, though specialization is not always a good thing. It results,
for example, in people who can't even fix a flat. Their tool of fixing
just about anything is the yellow pages.

As for health, dense living results in lot of civilization diseases,
higher stress levels and nowadays lung diseases because of pollution.
Probably also more cancer. Just about every time I reach the top of the
last hill to ride into the Sacramento Valley I see that brownish smog
line and I am thankful not to have to live down there. Other times I can
literally smell it.


I'm not so sure about the higher stress levels. I grew in a rural
village in New England and have lived in cities like Miami Fl, Tokyo,
Japan, Jakarta Indonesia and Bangkok Thailand and to be frank I have
never felt any stress from living in cities.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #26  
Old November 27th 17, 01:16 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,483
Default FLU

On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 1:30:19 PM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-26 12:11, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 9:45:53 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-26 09:30, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 8:07:32 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-26 07:18, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/25/2017 3:05 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-25 12:51, wrote:
On Saturday, November 25, 2017 at 1:48:06 PM UTC-7,
wrote:
the foil joke may prevent you from arranging with/into
your environment

try this ... if foil was a component then why not ....
?

J this is an older German architectural/psych concept:
terracotta buildings are healthier than steel reinforced
concrete ...a much larger off the ground scale

I cannot locate current info on the net


Steel re-enforced in most cases means some big residential
highrise in a congested area. No wonder that those people
are or feel less healthy. I have never understood the
desire of city folk to cram together like sardines in a
can.


Try an intro Anthropology book some time. Before The Inter
Webs, close proximity promoted exchange of ideas and
specialization of effort. Still does to some extent.


It does, though specialization is not always a good thing. It
results, for example, in people who can't even fix a flat.
Their tool of fixing just about anything is the yellow pages.

Fixing a flat IS specialization, particularly a tubular. Are you
saying the rugged individualists in Cameron Park -- a golf
community with an airstrip -- are more likely to fix their own
flats than the downtrodden city dwellers in, say, Portland or
Minneapolis?


Probably yes. For example, the folks in the airpark almost always
have a very well equipped hangar-size garage with huge tool chests.
Many also have certificates entitling them to officially repair
aircraft. If you can fix a leaking tire on an aircraft you can fix
it on a bicycle.


Do the airplane guys even own bikes?
http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/O...al-2522165.php
It seems like the idea is to burn fuel.


Many have bikes in their large garages. Not that they ride any more than
many of the other garage queen owners but for sure they'd know how to
fix it.


I probably see one-hundred times the cyclists you see on a daily
basis. I can guaranty you that all of them know how to fix a flat.



I have personally met several who didn't (and I fixed it for them).


https://bikeportland.org/2016/05/04/...o-essay-182506



Wow, the helmet quota is even higher than here where it's already well
over 95%.


These are ordinary city dwellers who actually ride and who account
for an appreciable share of traffic. They also do super-gnarly
weekend rides where they get to jump in puddles and drink beer!

BTW, I was flying with my brother yesterday in one of his planes. He
doesn't work on that plane because it has a RR jet turbine engine --
not something for the home mechanic.



No, and he must be super rich if that's just one of his planes. Attorney?


Airline captain. His day job is flying Dreamliners. The second plane is a Cessna 421. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_421 The turbo prop is a modified Cessna 210. https://tinyurl.com/y9v5ctsl Both are pressurized because he lives in Denver and frequently flies over the Rockies with dogs -- rescuing them from various places. He buys used planes, as do most plane owners.


... He does have a Trek city bike
with flat tires in his garage, but I'm confident that the can pump
those up -- even though he is a city dweller who lives in a condo
tower.


Different story. This is about the ability to fix a defect that isn't
just lack of air.


As for health, dense living results in lot of civilization
diseases, higher stress levels and nowadays lung diseases
because of pollution. Probably also more cancer. Just about
every time I reach the top of the last hill to ride into the
Sacramento Valley I see that brownish smog line and I am
thankful not to have to live down there. Other times I can
literally smell it.

And yet, you're headed to Sacramento to get goods and services
lacking in Cameron Park -- which is not surprising, since it was
designed as a parasitic bedroom community carved out of a
cow-pasture/vinyard. Rugged individualists with cars and strip
malls.


No, I take my pick. Often, like two days ago, I point the MTB east
and go to the Placerville area. They've got hardware stores and
just about everything needed. I never ride into Sacramento for
errands, if west I go to Folsom. I like to patronize their
businesses because that community did and does a stellar job for
cycling infrastructure. That needs to be rewarded. As long as you
don't ride much past Rancho Cordova the smell of smog won't
intensify too badly. Plus you are far off car traffic because it is
a bikle path separated so far that all you usually see is river and
nature.


BTW, rural populations typically fare worse in terms of physical
and mental health.
https://hpi.georgetown.edu/agingsoci...ral/rural.html


That is largely because of the much higher percentage of people
with longterm substance abuse problems, and most of all smoking. If
you live a healthy lifestyle country living is way better for you.


Since when is Cameron Park "country living."



Since pretty much forever:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfqa_fXf-DE


Yes, and I can link to trails in Portland fifteen minutes by bike from my high-rise, cement, steel and glass tower of urban decay and sickness. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nu7494oIWcc&t=13s Speaking of Denver, it has an incredible system of paved and unpaved bike lanes, although it is too far away from the Rockies for me. I'd rather be in Golden or Boulder.


... It's a f***** synthetic
community built around a golf course within commuting distance of
SAC. It's a commuter suburb. It's everything bad about land use and
planning in California. It's a virus. I'd be ashamed to live there.
You should move to a real town -- maybe Hurricane, UT or some other
moonscape where the rugged individuals know how to fix a flat!



Hurricane is precisely one of the areas on our radar for a potential
retirement move. St.George is too large for me but the surrounding
places are nice.


Hurricane is nice compared to the lunar surface. Zion is not close enough. I'd live in SLC but for the winter smog -- from wood burning stoves, among other things. The canyons are awesome for riding and skiing.

There may be some place in the Southwest I'd consider -- but there is no way I could acclimate to the Mesquite/Hurricane area. I could live in a Sonoran desert but not a Nevada nuke site. I'm also not going to live a zillion miles from an international airport. You're a convenient drive to SAC. Wait until its four or five hours to a real airport.


Also, with all the wood stove burning and automobiles in Cameron
Park, you'd have smog too if the town were in a valley, like
Sacramento.


We don't. Except on very cold days for the occasional expression
censored who are too incompetent to operate a wood stove.

When I worked in Rancho Cordova (Sacramento Valley) I could
sometimes feel the pollution in my lungs. Coming up the Bass Lake
Grade I rolled down the windows "Aaaah, finally fresh air". No that
I don't have to commute anymore I get fresh air all the time.


I get fresh air all the time, too, except where there are forest
fires. In fact, my air quality is better than yours:

My zip:
https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?act...19&s ubmit=Go
("Good")

Your zip:
https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?act...62&s ubmit=Go
("Moderate")

Gads! I'd stay indoors if I were you!


There is still some fire smell in the air. Remember that we had some big
ones? It was on the news.


Same here, but bigger. http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-...907-story.html Even with all the rain, they are still burning in places.on


Portland is too rainy and cold for us. Also, when moving for retirement
I'll make 110% sure we won't get into another liberal state. Which is
why California would be out for that purpose and so is Oregon. Now Idaho
would be nice but too cold for my wife.


Alabama is for you. I'm not tied to Portland and expect to leave one day, but I'm not moving to some **** hole with supposed right-thinking people. Washington is income tax free. Live in White Salmon and ski/ride on Hood. http://www.blainefranger.com/blog/up..._HoodRiver.jpg
PDX is an hour away, and I can cross the bridge and hang-out with the hipsters in Hood River. And PDX is an hour away so my wife and I can travel to some place warm when it gets dreary.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #27  
Old November 27th 17, 03:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,409
Default FLU

On 11/26/2017 7:16 PM, jbeattie wrote:
I'm not tied to Portland and expect to leave one day, but I'm not moving to some **** hole with supposed right-thinking people. Washington is income tax free. Live in White Salmon and ski/ride on Hood. http://www.blainefranger.com/blog/up..._HoodRiver.jpg
PDX is an hour away, and I can cross the bridge and hang-out with the hipsters in Hood River. And PDX is an hour away so my wife and I can travel to some place warm when it gets dreary.


About where to live - a true story:

When my daughter and her husband still lived in Portland, we'd visit a
couple times per year. Portland is a really interesting city. And
Portland's bike shops outnumber ours hundreds to one. Some of them carry
some stuff that's very hard to find around here.

So on one trip, I went into Citybikes (that den of tattooed socialism)
because they actually had a Shimano dynamo hub in stock. As I was paying
for it, I told the fetchingly tattooed cashier girl "I hope the TSA lets
me take this thing on the plane. A metal cylinder with wires dangling
from it may look suspicious." She asked "Where are you flying to?" so I
answered "Ohio."

Her response was wistful jealousy! "Oh, Ohio! My brother goes to college
in Ohio and he LOVES it! He says it's so green and pretty, and it
doesn't rain all winter! He talks about it all the time! I wish I could
move to Ohio!"

And indeed, at dinner tonight with two other couples, we were all saying
how much we love living here. Housing prices and other living expenses
are very low, we're just outside of a small city with unusual cultural
amenities for its size, we're about an hour from any of three larger
cities with even more to offer, and at least for my style of riding, the
bicycling is great.

To explain that latter point: Our little city is old enough to have
primarily a grid pattern. That means if one arterial is unpleasant, I
can choose to ride the residential collector one block over. It's like
an organically grown bike boulevard. And once I ride out of the suburbs
(maybe three miles if that) I'm on a dense network of little country
roads. See, Ohio was settled by farmers, some of the first frontier
settlers. They needed roads to get to each little farm, so there are
lots of low-traffic roads in a rough grid with spacing of about a mile.
There are endless choices for exploring.

And I happen to live within a couple miles of where the glaciers
stopped. That means if I want relatively flat rides, I head north or
west. If I want punishing hills, I head east or south - although I
choose that option less frequently these days.

Finally, I'm in an area known as the Connecticut Western Reserve, which
was originally chartered to Connecticut. Connecticut chose to sell it
off to its state residents before control of the territory was ceded to
the brand new Federal Government. Many of those early settlers brought
along their love for quaint little villages, charming New England
architecture, and village greens with gazebos and such. In rural areas
those old villages are spaced nicely - not too close, but not too far. A
day's bike ride can pass through ten of them, each with handy support
facilities.

When my wife, my daughter and I rode coast to coast, we saw lots and
lots of different types of countryside, different towns and cities. It
confirmed in my mind that this is the area where I want to live.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #28  
Old November 27th 17, 03:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,409
Default FLU

On 11/26/2017 12:49 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-26 09:48, wrote:
On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 9:03:32 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-25 16:30,
wrote:

*** goo.gl/CshRPR

assuming your superior healthy is an error ...


It isn't an error.


*************** ... around you people are not...

the 'satellite city' boom grew more high towers

I assume one n 2 stories are cheaper

nice photo couldn't find a view north of NYC

http://mossien.com/wp-content/upload...chester_NY.jpg



No ten horses would get me to live there.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


no no no the local pop's health. who gives a damn abt your health.


I do. If someone choses to smoke which rural folks often do that isn't
my problem, it's theirs.


If rural life is so wonderful, what drives those people to ruin their
lives by getting into their "long term substance abuse problems" that
you mentioned?

FWIW: When I was about 30 years old I thought it would be wonderful to
live a rural life. I'm extremely glad that I chose otherwise.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #29  
Old November 27th 17, 03:57 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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On 11/26/2017 12:29 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-26 09:16, AMuzi wrote:


This is a false dichotomy in that all of it can be true and likely is.
Choice is good, neither city nor rural life being perfect and humans
being by their nature a diverse lot.


Though as humans we need to recognize when we are damaging our bodies
and the denser the area the more that will happen. This is also why I'll
never understand people who say "Away with cycle paths, bicycles belong
on the road". I find that, sorry to say, stupid. Why would anyone in
their right mind want to travel alongside noisy and polluting combustion
engines buzzing by?


Another false dichotomy. Riding on the road does not mean ingesting
significant pollution. Several studies have shown that even in city
traffic, cyclists ingest less pollution than motor vehicle operators.
Other studies have shown that bicycle commuters live far longer than
those commuting by other means.

Besides, almost all of my riding involves relatively little traffic even
though I rarely use bike paths. I enjoy riding quiet roads, where I may
be passed by fewer than 20 cars per hour. But even on utility trips in
the city or its suburbs, I can usually choose quieter streets. On our
runs to the grocery store, we choose a route that gives us six miles
round trip. We'll typically be passed by only a dozen cars.

I suppose in some idealistic theory, we could convince the government to
build a separate bike trail between our house and that grocery. But what
if we need to get to the library instead? Or the pharmacy? Or the
hardware store? Or the doctor's office? Or my best friend's house?
Should I stay off my bike until the government builds separate paths to
each of those places, plus all the others I want to visit?

Sorry, Joerg. I chose instead to learn to ride on the roads, and I do so
in perfect comfort and safety. You should try that. https://abea.bike/
Even you can learn to do it.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #30  
Old November 27th 17, 07:03 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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bedroom burbs with airplanes is off the charts along with our German friend..

JB follows

this is nice but not flat more mtb

https://www.google.com/search?biw=11....0.15kqpojk8-M

 




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