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  #1  
Old October 30th 18, 08:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Personal Bike News

Good Evening,

1. I got a RockShox suspension pump. I didn't
bother with sag but followed the chart for
a 100mm travel suspension fork and a rider
with gear of 80-90kg: 120 PSI, tops, so
I put it there. It feels a bit funky; if
anything, I'd like more air, but perhaps I'm
not just tuned in to the suspension world.

The RockShox pump is a gorgeous tool with an
indicator with PSI and bar, and a button to
release the air wich makes it all but
a precision instrument.

However, it remains just a pump, and it cost
499 SEK which is 54.36 USD - I barely dare
ask, what the same item costs in the US?
(499 SEK is 47.94 Euro or 42.80 GBP.)

As for riding, I mostly note it when I brake
with the front wheel, but sometimes it feels
good, yes.

2. The shifters on the handlebars are still
cold even with gloves. I put some gorilla
tape [1] on the levers, as well as over the
protruding bolts. With a nail clippers, this
was an almost seamless fix. While it made
sense in theory, I had a feeling it wouldn't
make a difference in practice. But actually
I think it did, just a little!

3. I examined the saddle from Syncros and found
two M6 Allen bolts. Assuming 8.8 and no
grease, the maximum safe torque is 10Nm [2]
- however, here, they said 12-15! I put it
to 13 which amounted to a small increment.

4. As an experiment, I increased the PSI in the
front tire to 50 PSI (65 max) and the first
thing that happened, when it was +/-0C,
I made a right turn and flew over the bike.
The chain, the H20-bottle, the rear light
cover and the batteries flew off as well,
otherwise it was undramatic. What I had
before was ~35 PSI, and only Jehovah knows
if that would have made a difference.
The tires are 2.20.

5. I also got a CatEye Volt500XC lamp. If we
disregard the annoying blinking modes, it
has one mode of 500lm and one of 100. It is
easy to place and remove from the handlebar;
it is possible to rotate.

The coolest thing is that is has a memory,
so if you have it at 100lm, turn it off, and
then turn it on, you don't have to cycle to
get to 100lm again.

The second coolest thing is that it is
recharged with the common USB stuff that
everyone has nowadays, so no hassle with
batteries.

This was also 499 SEK, BTW.

On the ground, EB.

[1] https://www.gorillatough.com/gorilla-tape/
[2] http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573/bike/torque.jpg

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
Ads
  #2  
Old October 30th 18, 08:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,779
Default Personal Bike News

On 10/30/2018 2:11 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Good Evening,

1. I got a RockShox suspension pump. I didn't
bother with sag but followed the chart for
a 100mm travel suspension fork and a rider
with gear of 80-90kg: 120 PSI, tops, so
I put it there. It feels a bit funky; if
anything, I'd like more air, but perhaps I'm
not just tuned in to the suspension world.

The RockShox pump is a gorgeous tool with an
indicator with PSI and bar, and a button to
release the air wich makes it all but
a precision instrument.

However, it remains just a pump, and it cost
499 SEK which is 54.36 USD - I barely dare
ask, what the same item costs in the US?
(499 SEK is 47.94 Euro or 42.80 GBP.)
-snip-



US$28.07 to US$269.95:
https://www.amazon.com/RockShox-High.../dp/B07FTGR73R

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #3  
Old October 30th 18, 09:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Personal Bike News

AMuzi wrote:

US$28.07 to US$269.95:
https://www.amazon.com/RockShox-High.../dp/B07FTGR73R


?

Do they come in different sizes? Is that really
necessary? Do people typically do this is in
a hurry? Mine seems fast enough despite its
small size (protracted ~35cm).

Mine doesn't seem to have a version number
anywhere and I throw away the package. It goes
to 300 PSI or 20 bar plus change, if
that helps.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #4  
Old October 30th 18, 09:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,553
Default Personal Bike News

On 2018-10-30 12:11, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Good Evening,

1. I got a RockShox suspension pump. I didn't
bother with sag but followed the chart for
a 100mm travel suspension fork and a rider
with gear of 80-90kg: 120 PSI, tops, so
I put it there. It feels a bit funky; if
anything, I'd like more air, but perhaps I'm
not just tuned in to the suspension world.


Careful, 120psi is often the upper limit. At least it is on my fork.
Rear shocks are different, they have to be well above 200psi for serious
offroad riding. You don't ever want to bottom out on those. I have,
twice, and it is horrid. My fork runs at 110psi and that has never
bottomed out.


The RockShox pump is a gorgeous tool with an
indicator with PSI and bar, and a button to
release the air wich makes it all but
a precision instrument.

However, it remains just a pump, and it cost
499 SEK which is 54.36 USD - I barely dare
ask, what the same item costs in the US?
(499 SEK is 47.94 Euro or 42.80 GBP.)


You have overpaid, big time. My RockShox pump (red gauge) cost less half
in the US and you can even get if for that price in Europe:

https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/...ion-pump-33145


As for riding, I mostly note it when I brake
with the front wheel, but sometimes it feels
good, yes.


It feels really good when the road turns into this, like here in town:

http://analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Chapparal1.JPG


2. The shifters on the handlebars are still
cold even with gloves. I put some gorilla
tape [1] on the levers, as well as over the
protruding bolts. With a nail clippers, this
was an almost seamless fix. While it made
sense in theory, I had a feeling it wouldn't
make a difference in practice. But actually
I think it did, just a little!


There is a product idea! Heated shifter levers :-)


3. I examined the saddle from Syncros and found
two M6 Allen bolts. Assuming 8.8 and no
grease, the maximum safe torque is 10Nm [2]
- however, here, they said 12-15! I put it
to 13 which amounted to a small increment.

4. As an experiment, I increased the PSI in the
front tire to 50 PSI (65 max) and the first
thing that happened, when it was +/-0C,
I made a right turn and flew over the bike.
The chain, the H20-bottle, the rear light
cover and the batteries flew off as well,
otherwise it was undramatic. What I had
before was ~35 PSI, and only Jehovah knows
if that would have made a difference.
The tires are 2.20.


What did you do? Hit something? My MTB tires are kept between 55psi and
60psi. Rides a bit rougher than other bikes but no pinch flats and less
rolling resistance.


5. I also got a CatEye Volt500XC lamp. If we
disregard the annoying blinking modes, it
has one mode of 500lm and one of 100. It is
easy to place and remove from the handlebar;
it is possible to rotate.

The coolest thing is that is has a memory,
so if you have it at 100lm, turn it off, and
then turn it on, you don't have to cycle to
get to 100lm again.

The second coolest thing is that it is
recharged with the common USB stuff that
everyone has nowadays, so no hassle with
batteries.

This was also 499 SEK, BTW.


Pricey. For me all those lights have a much too pointy beam. I prefer a
MagicShine clone with an aftermarket diffusor lens which broadens the
beam in the horizontal direction. Much better light, does not blind
others and the cost including diffusor lens was under $20 per light. I
have them on both the road bike and the MTB.


On the ground, EB.


"On the ground" usually has a bad meaning with cyclists, as in
"involuntary dismount" :-)

[...]

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #5  
Old October 31st 18, 02:24 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 200
Default Personal Bike News

On Tue, 30 Oct 2018 20:11:44 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

Good Evening,

1. I got a RockShox suspension pump. I didn't
bother with sag but followed the chart for
a 100mm travel suspension fork and a rider
with gear of 80-90kg: 120 PSI, tops, so
I put it there. It feels a bit funky; if
anything, I'd like more air, but perhaps I'm
not just tuned in to the suspension world.

The RockShox pump is a gorgeous tool with an
indicator with PSI and bar, and a button to
release the air wich makes it all but
a precision instrument.

However, it remains just a pump, and it cost
499 SEK which is 54.36 USD - I barely dare
ask, what the same item costs in the US?
(499 SEK is 47.94 Euro or 42.80 GBP.)


Rockshox highpressure pump - US$28.07
https://www.amazon.com/RockShox-High.../dp/B07FTGR73R

:-)

--
Cheers

John B.
  #6  
Old October 31st 18, 12:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Personal Bike News

Joerg wrote:

Careful, 120psi is often the upper limit.
At least it is on my fork. Rear shocks are
different, they have to be well above 200psi
for serious offroad riding. You don't ever
want to bottom out on those. I have, twice,
and it is horrid. My fork runs at 110psi and
that has never bottomed out.


It is the RockShox RL 100mm. According to the
chart, one shouldn't exceed 205psi. So 120
should be fine.

But... aren't you more likely to bottom out if
you have *less* air in the chamber than more?
I.e., more likely with 110 than 120?

You have overpaid, big time. My RockShox pump
(red gauge) cost less half in the US and you
can even get if for that price in Europe:

https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/...ion-pump-33145


Overpaid, no kidding! Yet I bought it in the
one huge bike supermarket that exists here, off
town, Sportson [1], not in some niche small
shop in the city center.

As for buying stuff online, I almost never do
that altho I know it is less expensive
that way.

What did you do? Hit something? My MTB tires
are kept between 55psi and 60psi. Rides a bit
rougher than other bikes but no pinch flats
and less rolling resistance.


I made a normal right turn at a street
intersection at a moderate speed. But it was
+/-0C with freezing rain, so it was slippery.

On the ground, EB.


"On the ground" usually has a bad meaning
with cyclists, as in "involuntary
dismount" :-)


Unintentional humor that even made sense

[1] https://www.sportson.se

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
 




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