A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old November 4th 18, 12:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 200
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On Sat, 3 Nov 2018 11:05:52 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Thursday, November 1, 2018 at 10:32:45 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:

But now you have a genuine chain tool. Your macho cred is slipping away,
Joerg. To recover some cred, you'd better brag about drinking another
growler, quick!
--
- Frank Krygowski


Well..... I think if Joerg told us how he used his new fancy dandy effeminate rchain tool to fight off and maybe kill and skin a mountain lion or grizzly bear that attacked him, without cause, as he rode his local trail down to the nightly pub, then he could reclaim his cred. Of course it would depend on how he killed the wild animal. If he just used his chain tool as a ninja throwing star thing and hit the animal in the neck or eye, that would not be too impressive. But if he held off the animal with his forearm as it was biting him and he used the chain tool in his other hand to beat the poor animal in the head, that would be worthy of high cred. He would need lots of scratches and teeth marks and blood to be really impressive.



Impossible! After all Joerg's exploits normally happen after imbibing
a number of growler's of beer so the attack and killing would have to
happen on the way home from the nightly pub.... not on the way to the
pub :-)
cheers,

John B.



Ads
  #42  
Old November 4th 18, 01:13 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,439
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On Saturday, November 3, 2018 at 4:15:44 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, November 3, 2018 at 10:51:57 PM UTC, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, November 3, 2018 at 3:22:44 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, November 3, 2018 at 3:02:28 PM UTC, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, November 2, 2018 at 10:08:21 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Wednesday, October 31, 2018 at 6:19:01 PM UTC, Sepp Ruf wrote:
jbeattie wrote:
So I did this CLE speaking gig for the state bar

Probably meaning "communist-liberal elite"eg

Nah, you need balls and a certain insensitivity to blood on the carpet to be a real commie. Lawyer-folk are at best pale pink fellow-travellers, what Lenin called "useful idiots".

Like Roy Cohn and Joe McCarthy?

You reckon McCarthy was a pinko-commie-fellow-traveller? That's a novel interpretation.


No, they were both lawyers as were George Wallace and Nixon. You were talking about lawyers being pinkos.


I know. I suppose I could have been more explicit in pointing out that you were avoiding my point about the majority of lawyers *todAY*


The majority of lawyers today fit into their state and/or city demographic and/or their practice demographic. I defend businesses and their insurers. Those in my practice area tend to be conservative, but that is skewed by the fact that we're in Portland. My part of the Portland bar is populated by fiscal conservatives who are socially progressive, some more so than others -- and some not at all. I have a partner who is a Trump supporter and about as conservative as you can get, although Trump is not a true conservative. I have another partner whose wife cried when Trump was elected. We're all over the map and unusually gender and race diverse for Portland -- but you know what, we all like each other and spend a lot of time together, including time after work (and thus my stories of riding up gnarly hills to get home after stopping for a drink).

Marco Rubio is a lawyer. Ted Cruz is a lawyer. You can see where I'm going with this.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #43  
Old November 4th 18, 01:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,339
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On 11/2/2018 7:48 PM, John B. slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 2 Nov 2018 19:23:03 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 11/2/2018 12:47 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, November 1, 2018 at 5:09:42 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 31, 2018 at 1:25:59 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-31 10:43, jbeattie wrote:
So I did this CLE speaking gig for the state bar, and they gave me a
little Amazon card that I used to buy myself these uber-cheap Nashbar
p-handle hex wrenches.
https://tinyurl.com/y8rrfyuf (I got via Amazon
for the same price).


That link only produces a security warning here.


... What a great set of wrenches. I don't know how
I lived without these for so long, particularly with all the recessed
brake lever bolts these days. All this time I've been using long or
standard hex wrenches or hex multi wrenches like this:
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....PL._SX425_.jpg


I recently bought this, with matching pouch:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19

It appears to be almost indestructible but is too heavy for weight
weenies, over 7oz. I have it only for a few months but it already saved
the bacon twice, for other riders.

I gave one of those to my son, and the problem with that tool is that the hex wrenches are too short and certainly not anything you would want for shop work. Getting to the brake lever fixing bolt, you need a long wrench -- even with some olde tyme levers (assuming they don't have an 8mm nut), you need a longer hex wrench. Depending on the design of your bottle cage, shorty wrenches get caught up tightening the hex bolts. A lot of stuff you can do with a pocket tool, and I certainly carry one on the road, but most of the stuff I can do with a pocket tool at home, I use a click torque wrench -- something like this: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....L._SL1400_.jpg Or a regular torque wrench for any fastener above 6nm.

The el-cheapo Nashbar wrenches are great for getting to the cable anchors on the new 105, the brake lever fixing bolts, bottle cage bolts, initial tightening of crank pinch bolts, etc. Next best are just long-handle hex wrenches. I use a pocket tool on the road or in a pinch around the house.

-- Jay Beattie.

You are better of taking separate 4 and 5 mm hex and, lets get crazy a torx 25 key along with an adequate length instead of these clunky crap overpriced multitools where 80% of the included tools are never used and only getting in the way using the few you might actually need.


The strategy I heard about was: Go over your bike, checking for every
fastener that might reasonably need tightened. Take tools to fit those,
plus of course whatever you need for tire repair.

Admittedly, that advice was from back in the days of hex head bolts,
slotted screws and the like. These days a 4, 5 and 6 hex key would
probably be sufficient. Anything else would be for charity cases.


I replaced all fasteners on the bike with allen head bolts and,
including the ones on my "clipless" pedals I think I carry 4 allen
wrenches. I also carry a small chain tool, two links of chain and a
"master link" whatever the correct name of the thing is. On 10 speed
chains I also carry "chain pliers" as they are necessary to open the
"master link". Plus a couple of inner tubes and a couple of plastic
"tire tools". The whole kit fits in a small under saddle pouch and
weighs less then a pound.

But, more to the point, the only thing that I can remember coming
loose on a ride was a front fender stay and that was really because of
a poorly designed clamp that slipped and not the fastener.


I recall that Jobst didn't approve of thread lock compounds (e.g.
Loctite) on bike parts. I never understood why. I think they've saved me
thousands of hours of fussing with fender stays, racks, etc.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #44  
Old November 4th 18, 02:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 200
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On Sat, 3 Nov 2018 20:47:27 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 11/2/2018 7:48 PM, John B. slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 2 Nov 2018 19:23:03 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 11/2/2018 12:47 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, November 1, 2018 at 5:09:42 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, October 31, 2018 at 1:25:59 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-31 10:43, jbeattie wrote:
So I did this CLE speaking gig for the state bar, and they gave me a
little Amazon card that I used to buy myself these uber-cheap Nashbar
p-handle hex wrenches.
https://tinyurl.com/y8rrfyuf (I got via Amazon
for the same price).


That link only produces a security warning here.


... What a great set of wrenches. I don't know how
I lived without these for so long, particularly with all the recessed
brake lever bolts these days. All this time I've been using long or
standard hex wrenches or hex multi wrenches like this:
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....PL._SX425_.jpg


I recently bought this, with matching pouch:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19

It appears to be almost indestructible but is too heavy for weight
weenies, over 7oz. I have it only for a few months but it already saved
the bacon twice, for other riders.

I gave one of those to my son, and the problem with that tool is that the hex wrenches are too short and certainly not anything you would want for shop work. Getting to the brake lever fixing bolt, you need a long wrench -- even with some olde tyme levers (assuming they don't have an 8mm nut), you need a longer hex wrench. Depending on the design of your bottle cage, shorty wrenches get caught up tightening the hex bolts. A lot of stuff you can do with a pocket tool, and I certainly carry one on the road, but most of the stuff I can do with a pocket tool at home, I use a click torque wrench -- something like this: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....L._SL1400_.jpg Or a regular torque wrench for any fastener above 6nm.

The el-cheapo Nashbar wrenches are great for getting to the cable anchors on the new 105, the brake lever fixing bolts, bottle cage bolts, initial tightening of crank pinch bolts, etc. Next best are just long-handle hex wrenches. I use a pocket tool on the road or in a pinch around the house.

-- Jay Beattie.

You are better of taking separate 4 and 5 mm hex and, lets get crazy a torx 25 key along with an adequate length instead of these clunky crap overpriced multitools where 80% of the included tools are never used and only getting in the way using the few you might actually need.

The strategy I heard about was: Go over your bike, checking for every
fastener that might reasonably need tightened. Take tools to fit those,
plus of course whatever you need for tire repair.

Admittedly, that advice was from back in the days of hex head bolts,
slotted screws and the like. These days a 4, 5 and 6 hex key would
probably be sufficient. Anything else would be for charity cases.


I replaced all fasteners on the bike with allen head bolts and,
including the ones on my "clipless" pedals I think I carry 4 allen
wrenches. I also carry a small chain tool, two links of chain and a
"master link" whatever the correct name of the thing is. On 10 speed
chains I also carry "chain pliers" as they are necessary to open the
"master link". Plus a couple of inner tubes and a couple of plastic
"tire tools". The whole kit fits in a small under saddle pouch and
weighs less then a pound.

But, more to the point, the only thing that I can remember coming
loose on a ride was a front fender stay and that was really because of
a poorly designed clamp that slipped and not the fastener.


I recall that Jobst didn't approve of thread lock compounds (e.g.
Loctite) on bike parts. I never understood why. I think they've saved me
thousands of hours of fussing with fender stays, racks, etc.


I don't use thread locking stuff although if it is there, as it is in
a lot of new Shimano bits, I don't bother to wash it off and I never
seem to have things get loose. Even the stop screws in a rear shifter
that probably should have had thread lock don't seem to have moved in
a year or more.

Of course, I slow down over the bumps and dodge the "chuck holes",
maybe if I rode more aggressively...
cheers,

John B.



 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Right size wrenches/spanners, the proper nuts, and wrenches designedto ruin components Andre Jute[_2_] Techniques 13 May 18th 15 06:28 PM
Abandoned Royal Mail Cvcle. g.harman UK 35 October 18th 05 06:34 AM
Royal Mail - Bikes2Work Michael MacClancy UK 3 May 1st 05 05:18 PM
" Royal Mail swaps bikes for guns" Call me Bob UK 3 January 4th 05 12:18 PM
Royal Mail Strike Again iarocu UK 40 December 17th 03 05:27 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.