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Preserving en-route repair material



 
 
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  #11  
Old November 9th 18, 04:19 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,339
Default Preserving en-route repair material

On 11/8/2018 9:54 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Thursday, November 8, 2018 at 8:51:17 PM UTC-5, John B. slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 8 Nov 2018 17:48:55 -0800 (PST), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

I've used some of the PARK glue-less patches. Sometimes they are permanent

and other times like you they seem to be temporary to get you home.
It's REALLY important to have the tube absolutely clean before
applying those patches.

Cheers


So sitting on the side of the road, in a rain storm, all muddy and
wet, is not the optimum time to use them :-)
cheers,

John B.


Nope; nor is it an optimal time to use a patch and glue. I got caught in a rain and had a slow leak many years ago and I could not find that pin hole let alone repair it. That's when I started carrying at least one spare tube in addition to my patch kit.


I almost never try to patch a tube at the roadside. Each bike carries
one extra tube, and it's so much faster to just remove any sharp objects
still in the tire, then replace the tube.

Besides, it's way easier to patch a tube at home, where the workspace is
optimum and extra tools are available.

My patch kit is only for "multiple flat" days. (I remember one day with
three flats within an hour.)

--
- Frank Krygowski
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  #12  
Old November 9th 18, 12:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_4_]
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Default Preserving en-route repair material

John B. slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 8 Nov 2018 11:50:49 -0500, Duane
wrote:

On 08/11/2018 11:26 AM, Mark J. wrote:
On 11/7/2018 11:12 AM, Duane wrote:
On 07/11/2018 8:08 AM, Tanguy Ortolo wrote:
Hello all,

As probably many of you, I keep essential repair tools and material in a
small bag under my saddle, that is: a folding screwdriver, a spare inner
tube, tire levers, patches, sandpaper and glue. And disposable plastic
gloves!

Anyway, I have an issue with preserving the spare inner tube and the
glue over time. I noticed the tube gets punctured, apparently by
abrasion, and the glue slowly evaporates, like its tube is not really
airtight.

I read somewhere that I could protect the tube by keeping it tightly
wrapped into an old sock, which I will try, but would you have any
advice regarding the glue?

Cheers,


I keep my tubes in a baggie. Not sure what you can do for glue.

For glue tubes, the RBT consensus appears to be:

1) Once opened, replace the glue tube.* (I usually save up flats so I
can use up more of a tube upon opening; glue tubes in the saddle bag are
one-shot emergency items).

2) Replace /un/opened glue tubes periodically, 'cause even unopened ones
dry out over time.* This one is hard to follow, who remembers when they
last changed that glue tube in their saddle bag?

Mark J.


I don't carry glue. I carry two tubes and a patch kit. I just replaced
the patch kit after reading this thread as I haven't used a patch in a
few years.


Does anyone use those "glue-less" patches? I've tried them a few times
and they don't seem to stick very well and the few that did stick
seemed to leak a lot and I had to replace them with conventional glue
on patches after getting home.
cheers,

John B.





If you mean the peel and stick patches, that’s what I carry. They’re only
for an emergency when I run through my two tubes and there’s no one with me
to borrow a tube from. This rarely happens hence the periodic
replacement.

I don’t know how well they work long term. I’ve only used them to get home
and only rarely.

--
duane
  #13  
Old November 9th 18, 07:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: 2,909
Default Preserving en-route repair material

On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 06:11:20 +0700, John B. slocomb
wrote:

I have had good luck with keeping the tire tube in a plastic zip-lock
bag. As for glue, once the tube is opened I just throw any remainder
away. My LBS sells tiny tubes of glue for pennies.


I did an experiment sealing a glue bottle inside various types of
plastic bags. None of them prevented the glue from hardening probably
because I allowed too much air inside the bottle and bag. If I do it
again, I'm going to try a CO2 purge and use aluminized mylar bags.
https://www.uline.com/BL_5552/Food-Bags

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #14  
Old November 9th 18, 09:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
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Posts: 5,771
Default Preserving en-route repair material

On 10/11/18 5:24 am, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 06:11:20 +0700, John B. slocomb
wrote:

I have had good luck with keeping the tire tube in a plastic zip-lock
bag. As for glue, once the tube is opened I just throw any remainder
away. My LBS sells tiny tubes of glue for pennies.


I did an experiment sealing a glue bottle inside various types of
plastic bags. None of them prevented the glue from hardening probably
because I allowed too much air inside the bottle and bag. If I do it
again, I'm going to try a CO2 purge and use aluminized mylar bags.
https://www.uline.com/BL_5552/Food-Bags


Reminds me of someone I knew who spent $5 worth of silicon to repair a
$2 plastic bucket.

--
JS
  #15  
Old November 9th 18, 10:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: 2,909
Default Preserving en-route repair material

On Sat, 10 Nov 2018 07:34:03 +1100, James
wrote:

On 10/11/18 5:24 am, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 06:11:20 +0700, John B. slocomb
wrote:

I have had good luck with keeping the tire tube in a plastic zip-lock
bag. As for glue, once the tube is opened I just throw any remainder
away. My LBS sells tiny tubes of glue for pennies.


I did an experiment sealing a glue bottle inside various types of
plastic bags. None of them prevented the glue from hardening probably
because I allowed too much air inside the bottle and bag. If I do it
again, I'm going to try a CO2 purge and use aluminized mylar bags.
https://www.uline.com/BL_5552/Food-Bags


Reminds me of someone I knew who spent $5 worth of silicon to repair a
$2 plastic bucket.


I've done far worse. I recently spent about $60 ordering various
LED's (in 100 pcs quantities) to improve on a $5 relay indicator light
for which there was an immediate requirement for only 6 relays and a
future requirement for about 50 more.
https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en#!topic/sci.electronics.design/2NCYlHgUQy0

So, why bother? Because, I think of all such design exercises in
terms of a sellable and hopefully profitable product. The initial
exercise might be rather expensive, but future variations on the basic
design might be better. Would you purchase an air tight aluminized
mylar bag for storing your rubber cement? Probably not. Would you
purchase the same thing for keeping your pills, snacks, first aid
supplies, and chemicals dry. Maybe. As it happens, such products
already exist, but not specifically for cycling.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #16  
Old November 9th 18, 10:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Posts: 119
Default Preserving en-route repair material

On Wed, 07 Nov 2018 13:08:50 +0000, Tanguy Ortolo wrote:

I read somewhere that I could protect the tube by keeping it tightly
wrapped into an old sock, which I will try, but would you have any
advice regarding the glue?


IME, the thread on those tubes is very loose/coarse, so they don't seal
tightly, hence the drying over time. The only tip I can think of is to
put a thin layer of plastic under the cap to improve sealing and reduce
the tendency to dry out.

OTOH, when unopened aluminium tubes of super glue dry out, you have to
expect super thin aluminium tubes must have microholes in them, but as a
card of 7 costs a whole $2 in the cheap shop, it isn't really a problms.
Similarly, I just reguard regularly buying a new tube of patch glue a
maintenance issue. YMMV but the local mini supermarket has a sectin of
knick knacks that include bicycle punture kits as an economic price,
  #17  
Old November 10th 18, 03:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,339
Default Preserving en-route repair material

On 11/9/2018 4:56 PM, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 07 Nov 2018 13:08:50 +0000, Tanguy Ortolo wrote:

I read somewhere that I could protect the tube by keeping it tightly
wrapped into an old sock, which I will try, but would you have any
advice regarding the glue?


IME, the thread on those tubes is very loose/coarse, so they don't seal
tightly, hence the drying over time. The only tip I can think of is to
put a thin layer of plastic under the cap to improve sealing and reduce
the tendency to dry out.

OTOH, when unopened aluminium tubes of super glue dry out, you have to
expect super thin aluminium tubes must have microholes in them, but as a
card of 7 costs a whole $2 in the cheap shop, it isn't really a problms.
Similarly, I just reguard regularly buying a new tube of patch glue a
maintenance issue. YMMV but the local mini supermarket has a sectin of
knick knacks that include bicycle punture kits as an economic price,


When traveling in a new city (or country) I like to browse in the bike
shops. If the shop staff are friendly to me, I like to buy some little
trinket as a souvenir and give them a little business. Often the trinket
I pick is a patch kit.

In Amsterdam I chose a fresh supply of patches, rather than the entire
kit, since I seem to run out of the 15mm round patches before I run out
of the rubber cement. But this discussion is making me question my choice.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #18  
Old November 15th 18, 09:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Gregory Sutter
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Posts: 162
Default Preserving en-route repair material

On 2018-11-09, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Thursday, November 8, 2018 at 6:03:17 PM UTC-5, John B. slocomb wrote:

Does anyone use those "glue-less" patches?


I've used some of the PARK glue-less patches. Sometimes they are
permanent and other times like you they seem to be temporary to get
you home. It's REALLY important to have the tube absolutely clean
before applying those patches.


Park glueless patches are okay at best for tube repair. However,
they make a great tire boot. Say, after you stop and change the
tube and pull the nail/screw/bottle-opwner from your tire, then
stick a glueless patch over the hole in the tire. Stays put, and
plenty strong enough to prevent a blowout.

--
Gregory S. Sutter Mostly Harmless

http://zer0.org/~gsutter/
  #19  
Old November 15th 18, 10:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Gregory Sutter
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Posts: 162
Default Preserving en-route repair material

On 2018-11-07, Tanguy Ortolo wrote:

I read somewhere that I could protect the tube by keeping it tightly
wrapped into an old sock, which I will try, but would you have any
advice regarding the glue?


For the tube, an old sock can be insufficient to prevent rub-through
failure. (I've been there.) Zip-top plastic bags suffer the same
fate. For the past few years I've been using bags made from tubes:

https://www.greengurugear.com/collec...m-zipper-pouch

Although the zippers aren't perfect, those bags haven't worn through
since I began using them, making them the best solution so far.

(For the glue, as many others have recommended, just don't expect to
use a container more than once, and test it every so often to ensure
it's still liquid.)

--
Gregory S. Sutter Mostly Harmless

http://zer0.org/~gsutter/
  #20  
Old November 16th 18, 11:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
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Posts: 1,078
Default Preserving en-route repair material

Gregory Sutter writes:

On 2018-11-07, Tanguy Ortolo wrote:

I read somewhere that I could protect the tube by keeping it tightly
wrapped into an old sock, which I will try, but would you have any
advice regarding the glue?


For the tube, an old sock can be insufficient to prevent rub-through
failure. (I've been there.) Zip-top plastic bags suffer the same
fate. For the past few years I've been using bags made from tubes:

https://www.greengurugear.com/collec...m-zipper-pouch

Although the zippers aren't perfect, those bags haven't worn through
since I began using them, making them the best solution so far.


That looks pretty sturdy. Agree on the fragility of ziptop bags,
they're not made to last, at all.

I use a small roll-top nylon bag intended for backpacking, I seem to
recall it was suprisingly spendy, but after several years who can
remember? No holes, keeps out water, pretty shade of blue. I keep the
tools in an old sock inside the bag -- keeps them together, prevents
them rubbing the tube, and gives me something to wipe my hands on.

(For the glue, as many others have recommended, just don't expect to
use a container more than once, and test it every so often to ensure
it's still liquid.)


--
 




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