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Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 31st 18, 06:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,441
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

So I did this CLE speaking gig for the state bar, and they gave me a little Amazon card that I used to buy myself these uber-cheap Nashbar p-handle hex wrenches. https://tinyurl.com/y8rrfyuf (I got via Amazon for the same price). What a great set of wrenches. I don't know how I lived without these for so long, particularly with all the recessed brake lever bolts these days. All this time I've been using long or standard hex wrenches or hex multi wrenches like this: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....PL._SX425_.jpg

Speaking of brake levers, I decided to upgrade my commuter to hydraulic discs because with the new Cannondale warranty replacement frame, the cables for the rear disc run through housing from the lever to the caliper, and the cable bends and housing length added a lot of drag -- and the BB7 calipers were haunted by Frank's potergeist and would periodically drag, even though the return spring seemed adequate. The old Avids have notoriously wimpy return springs. I found some old stock 105 levers and calipers on super-sale from a domestic eBay seller. They're the superseded ST505s, which are kind of bulky levers, but I actually like the feel. I have them on my Norco as OE.

So, I put those on with the other mandatory upgrades, installed and filled the hydraulic hoses/levers/calipers (yet another adapter) and put in the gear cables. I shifted the RD, and the cable predictably loosened as the housing settled in and pulled into the lever with its little finned ferrule. But it kept settling. I peel back the hood, and as it turned out, the cable housing and ferrule had not seated but had been dislodged during some part of the process, and with all the shifting, I had managed to drag the housing and ferrule into the lever body where it broke a $.10 plastic internal cable guide. This: http://si.shimano.com/pdfs/ev/EV-ST-RS505-3902.pdf (part 5).

Crap man, it was designated as a wear item, so the part should be available.. Nope -- not from Shimano or my local shops. And the cable does not stay put through the lever without the guide, so I'm SOL unless I can find a replacement. The only place I could find was SJS in Somerset. I think I got their last one, and it only took a week via Royal Mail/USP. The price was not crazy, either -- even with postage. I threw it in last night, and it works like a charm. If I break that part again, I think I would have to get it from some re-seller in Japan or Germany. That's incredible for a lever that is maybe two years out of date and for an alleged wear item. This is now SOP with the constant product upgrades from Shimano. One pines away for the days when nothing worked that well, but it didn't change from year to year.

-- Jay Beattie.




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  #2  
Old October 31st 18, 08:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,341
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On 10/31/2018 1:43 PM, jbeattie wrote:

Speaking of brake levers, I decided to upgrade my commuter to hydraulic discs because with the new Cannondale warranty replacement frame, the cables for the rear disc run through housing from the lever to the caliper, and the cable bends and housing length added a lot of drag -- and the BB7 calipers were haunted by Frank's potergeist and would periodically drag, even though the return spring seemed adequate.


Nope, that wasn't my poltergeist. She only does electronics.

So, I put those on with the other mandatory upgrades, installed and filled the hydraulic hoses/levers/calipers (yet another adapter) and put in the gear cables. I shifted the RD, and the cable predictably loosened as the housing settled in and pulled into the lever with its little finned ferrule. But it kept settling. I peel back the hood, and as it turned out, the cable housing and ferrule had not seated but had been dislodged during some part of the process, and with all the shifting, I had managed to drag the housing and ferrule into the lever body where it broke a $.10 plastic internal cable guide. This: http://si.shimano.com/pdfs/ev/EV-ST-RS505-3902.pdf (part 5).

Crap man, it was designated as a wear item, so the part should be available. Nope -- not from Shimano or my local shops. And the cable does not stay put through the lever without the guide, so I'm SOL unless I can find a replacement. The only place I could find was SJS in Somerset. I think I got their last one, and it only took a week via Royal Mail/USP. The price was not crazy, either -- even with postage. I threw it in last night, and it works like a charm. If I break that part again, I think I would have to get it from some re-seller in Japan or Germany. That's incredible for a lever that is maybe two years out of date and for an alleged wear item.


If its a plastic part, I wonder how soon we'll be able to get 3-d
printed replacements. Shimano's doubtlessly got a computer solid model
of the piece they could release. There are thousands of "maker"
hobbyists who could then get their printer to squirt you a new one, and
maybe in the future bike shops could do the same. (Is Andy listening?)
Tolerances wouldn't be wonderful, but for something like that, they
might not be critical.

It's probably possible without the solid model, but I think it would
first involve some sophisticated 3-d scanning, and those machines are
way less common.

This is now SOP with the constant product upgrades from Shimano. One
pines away for the days when nothing worked that well, but it didn't
change from year to year.

:-) Most of my equipment seems to top out at about 1990s level of
technology. It's as reliable as a hammer, and personally I'm fine with
it. Except for index shifting (which I still mostly live without) I
think it's all been diminishing returns since then.

To put it another way: Lower your expectations! You'll be happier!

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #3  
Old October 31st 18, 08:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,441
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On Wednesday, October 31, 2018 at 12:09:27 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/31/2018 1:43 PM, jbeattie wrote:

Speaking of brake levers, I decided to upgrade my commuter to hydraulic discs because with the new Cannondale warranty replacement frame, the cables for the rear disc run through housing from the lever to the caliper, and the cable bends and housing length added a lot of drag -- and the BB7 calipers were haunted by Frank's potergeist and would periodically drag, even though the return spring seemed adequate.


Nope, that wasn't my poltergeist. She only does electronics.

So, I put those on with the other mandatory upgrades, installed and filled the hydraulic hoses/levers/calipers (yet another adapter) and put in the gear cables. I shifted the RD, and the cable predictably loosened as the housing settled in and pulled into the lever with its little finned ferrule.. But it kept settling. I peel back the hood, and as it turned out, the cable housing and ferrule had not seated but had been dislodged during some part of the process, and with all the shifting, I had managed to drag the housing and ferrule into the lever body where it broke a $.10 plastic internal cable guide. This: http://si.shimano.com/pdfs/ev/EV-ST-RS505-3902.pdf (part 5).

Crap man, it was designated as a wear item, so the part should be available. Nope -- not from Shimano or my local shops. And the cable does not stay put through the lever without the guide, so I'm SOL unless I can find a replacement. The only place I could find was SJS in Somerset. I think I got their last one, and it only took a week via Royal Mail/USP. The price was not crazy, either -- even with postage. I threw it in last night, and it works like a charm. If I break that part again, I think I would have to get it from some re-seller in Japan or Germany. That's incredible for a lever that is maybe two years out of date and for an alleged wear item.


If its a plastic part, I wonder how soon we'll be able to get 3-d
printed replacements. Shimano's doubtlessly got a computer solid model
of the piece they could release. There are thousands of "maker"
hobbyists who could then get their printer to squirt you a new one, and
maybe in the future bike shops could do the same. (Is Andy listening?)
Tolerances wouldn't be wonderful, but for something like that, they
might not be critical.

It's probably possible without the solid model, but I think it would
first involve some sophisticated 3-d scanning, and those machines are
way less common.

This is now SOP with the constant product upgrades from Shimano. One
pines away for the days when nothing worked that well, but it didn't
change from year to year.

:-) Most of my equipment seems to top out at about 1990s level of
technology. It's as reliable as a hammer, and personally I'm fine with
it. Except for index shifting (which I still mostly live without) I
think it's all been diminishing returns since then.

To put it another way: Lower your expectations! You'll be happier!



I do like hydraulic road discs, but if I want them on my commuter, it means upgrading to 11sp. TRP makes a road hydraulic lever sans shifter, but then I would need DT shifters which aren't a possibility on my warranty replacement CAADX. I also like STI.


I didn't want to upgrade to 11sp, but my old 9sp hoods were worn through (with no available replacements), and the cassette and chain were in for a replacement anyway -- and the rear derailleur was a Nashbar $20 special which replaced an antique 600EX derailleur. So I bit the bullet. With all the local price competition and the fact that shifters/brakes were close-outs on Fleabay, it wasn't that expensive. I'll just live with more frequent chain/cassette replacement.

Another unfortunate part of the sale-table upgrade is that the calipers come with resin pads and not the metal pads, which I prefer and are quieter. My resident Avid 6-bolt rotors also don't work as well as the more-expensive Shimano Ice-Tech (!) rotors. They also have a less cool name -- and that matters.

New 105 rear derailleurs have that odd pivot arrangement. But once you figure it out, its just the same old same old. It doesn't seem to work any better than other derailleurs, but with the new b-adjuster on steroids, you can really change the chain wrap a lot. https://www.jensonusa.com/globalasse...b00blk--gs.jpg The problem with the tucked-in so-called "shadow design" is that your cable ends really have to be bobbed or they end up in the spokes.

Time marches on! (for better or worse)

-- Jay Beattie.
  #4  
Old October 31st 18, 09:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,554
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On 2018-10-31 10:43, jbeattie wrote:
So I did this CLE speaking gig for the state bar, and they gave me a
little Amazon card that I used to buy myself these uber-cheap Nashbar
p-handle hex wrenches. https://tinyurl.com/y8rrfyuf (I got via Amazon
for the same price).



That link only produces a security warning here.


... What a great set of wrenches. I don't know how
I lived without these for so long, particularly with all the recessed
brake lever bolts these days. All this time I've been using long or
standard hex wrenches or hex multi wrenches like this:
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....PL._SX425_.jpg


I recently bought this, with matching pouch:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19

It appears to be almost indestructible but is too heavy for weight
weenies, over 7oz. I have it only for a few months but it already saved
the bacon twice, for other riders.


Speaking of brake levers, I decided to upgrade my commuter to
hydraulic discs because with the new Cannondale warranty replacement
frame, the cables for the rear disc run through housing from the
lever to the caliper, and the cable bends and housing length added a
lot of drag -- and the BB7 calipers were haunted by Frank's
potergeist and would periodically drag, even though the return spring
seemed adequate. The old Avids have notoriously wimpy return
springs. I found some old stock 105 levers and calipers on super-sale
from a domestic eBay seller. They're the superseded ST505s, which
are kind of bulky levers, but I actually like the feel. I have them
on my Norco as OE.

So, I put those on with the other mandatory upgrades, installed and
filled the hydraulic hoses/levers/calipers (yet another adapter) and
put in the gear cables. I shifted the RD, and the cable predictably
loosened as the housing settled in and pulled into the lever with its
little finned ferrule. But it kept settling. I peel back the hood,
and as it turned out, the cable housing and ferrule had not seated
but had been dislodged during some part of the process, and with all
the shifting, I had managed to drag the housing and ferrule into the
lever body where it broke a $.10 plastic internal cable guide. This:
http://si.shimano.com/pdfs/ev/EV-ST-RS505-3902.pdf (part 5).


The ferrule looks like a piece one could even make without a lathe. I
have used an electric drill and a file as a lathe for similar jobs.
Mostly for plumbing stuff that was discontinued. It's similar in that
world, you do not always get what you paid for and a high price
guarantees nothing.

The biggest ferrule-style thing I made with my drill was an almost
fist-size post for a wine fridge.


Crap man, it was designated as a wear item, so the part should be
available. Nope -- not from Shimano or my local shops. And the cable
does not stay put through the lever without the guide, so I'm SOL
unless I can find a replacement. The only place I could find was SJS
in Somerset. I think I got their last one, and it only took a week
via Royal Mail/USP.



Those guys really get to it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QsZhjaBZRY

I was once (as a visiting foreigner!) pressed into service for the Royal
Mail in Scotland. The mail from Durness to Inverness was normally
transported on a bus but that had broken down up there. So they asked me
if I could bring their mail to Inverness and deliver it to the post
office though they couldn't pay me. I said to be honored and they loaded
my car with the mail crates. My mail delivery vehicle was an old and
somewhat tired Ford Cortina. On the way a fuse fell out and the engine
stalled but luckily I found it. Back then it was a single-lane dirt and
gravel road.


... The price was not crazy, either -- even with
postage. I threw it in last night, and it works like a charm. If I
break that part again, I think I would have to get it from some
re-seller in Japan or Germany. That's incredible for a lever that is
maybe two years out of date and for an alleged wear item. This is
now SOP with the constant product upgrades from Shimano. One pines
away for the days when nothing worked that well, but it didn't change
from year to year.


Yep, like my downtube friction shifters. I could always buy new ones for
just a few dollars but nothing breaks.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #5  
Old October 31st 18, 10:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

jbeattie wrote:

So I did this CLE speaking gig for the state
bar, and they gave me a little Amazon card
that I used to buy myself these uber-cheap
Nashbar p-handle hex wrenches.
https://tinyurl.com/y8rrfyuf


Looks awesome!

I have the Bondhus "L" hex wrenches [1].
They are very good, but I'd like a set of
P-handle wrenches, to, and it's planned for the
next month's hardware store visit. Perhaps not
as fancy as yours tho...

Is clearance ever a problem with those somewhat
bulky handles?

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....PL._SX425_.jpg


Yeah, more of a toolbox-at-home thing or on
the expedition perhaps.

[1] https://www.homedepot.com/p/Bondhus-...15MB/302013649

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #6  
Old November 1st 18, 04:36 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,771
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On Wednesday, October 31, 2018 at 4:25:59 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped
I recently bought this, with matching pouch:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19

It appears to be almost indestructible but is too heavy for weight
weenies, over 7oz. I have it only for a few months but it already saved
the bacon twice, for other riders.

Snipped

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


So you FINALLY got a chain repair tool! Congratualtions! Now you won't have to scrounge for a nail and rock to fix a chain whilst moutain lions are stalking you.

VBEG

Cheers
  #7  
Old November 1st 18, 01:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 196
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On 31/10/2018 4:26 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-31 10:43, jbeattie wrote:
So I did this CLE speaking gig for the state bar, and they gave me a
little Amazon card that I used to buy myself these uber-cheap Nashbar
p-handle hex wrenches. https://tinyurl.com/y8rrfyuf (I got via Amazon
for the same price).



That link only produces a security warning here.


********** ...* What a great set of wrenches.* I don't know how
I lived without these for so long, particularly with all the recessed
brake lever bolts these days. All this time I've been using long or
standard hex wrenches or hex multi wrenches like this:
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....PL._SX425_.jpg


I recently bought this, with matching pouch:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19

It appears to be almost indestructible but is too heavy for weight
weenies, over 7oz. I have it only for a few months but it already saved
the bacon twice, for other riders.


You mean like the weight weenies that told you to get a combination tool
rather than go looking for rocks and nails?

I have the same tool and don't find 175g too much to carry. But then
again, I don't have to make room for growlers and 4 lb tubes.


*Speaking of brake levers, I decided to upgrade my commuter to
hydraulic discs because with the new Cannondale warranty replacement
frame, the cables for the rear disc run through housing from the
lever to the caliper, and the cable bends and housing length added a
lot of drag -- and the BB7 calipers were haunted by Frank's
potergeist and would periodically drag, even though the return spring
seemed adequate.* The old Avids have notoriously wimpy return
springs. I found some old stock 105 levers and calipers on super-sale
from a domestic eBay seller.* They're the superseded ST505s, which
are kind of bulky levers, but I actually like the feel.* I have them
on my Norco as OE.

So, I put those on with the other mandatory upgrades, installed and
filled the hydraulic hoses/levers/calipers (yet another adapter) and
put in the gear cables. I shifted the RD, and the cable predictably
loosened as the housing settled in and pulled into the lever with its
little finned ferrule.* But it kept settling.* I peel back the hood,
and as it turned out, the cable housing and ferrule had not seated
but had been dislodged during some part of the process, and with all
the shifting, I had managed to drag the housing and ferrule into the
lever body where it broke a $.10 plastic internal cable guide.* This:
http://si.shimano.com/pdfs/ev/EV-ST-RS505-3902.pdf (part 5).


The ferrule looks like a piece one could even make without a lathe. I
have used an electric drill and a file as a lathe for similar jobs.
Mostly for plumbing stuff that was discontinued. It's similar in that
world, you do not always get what you paid for and a high price
guarantees nothing.

The biggest ferrule-style thing I made with my drill was an almost
fist-size post for a wine fridge.


Crap man, it was designated as a wear item, so the part should be
available.* Nope -- not from Shimano or my local shops. And the cable
does not stay put through the lever without the guide, so I'm SOL
unless I can find a replacement.* The only place I could find was SJS
in Somerset.* I think I got their last one, and it only took a week
via Royal Mail/USP.



Those guys really get to it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QsZhjaBZRY

I was once (as a visiting foreigner!) pressed into service for the Royal
Mail in Scotland. The mail from Durness to Inverness was normally
transported on a bus but that had broken down up there. So they asked me
if I could bring their mail to Inverness and deliver it to the post
office though they couldn't pay me. I said to be honored and they loaded
my car with the mail crates. My mail delivery vehicle was an old and
somewhat tired Ford Cortina. On the way a fuse fell out and the engine
stalled but luckily I found it. Back then it was a single-lane dirt and
gravel road.


*************** ... The price was not crazy, either -- even with
postage.* I threw it in last night, and it works like a charm.* If I
break that part again, I think I would have to get it from some
re-seller in Japan or Germany.* That's incredible for a lever that is
maybe two years out of date and for an alleged wear item.* This is
now SOP with the constant product upgrades from Shimano.* One pines
away for the days when nothing worked that well, but it didn't change
from year to year.


Yep, like my downtube friction shifters. I could always buy new ones for
just a few dollars but nothing breaks.


In my opinion, the single biggest improvement of modern bike tech has
been brifters. I can't imagine using downtube friction shifters now.
Even if replacements are expensive. I don't know though since I've
never replaced anything other than a cable.
  #8  
Old November 1st 18, 02:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,554
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On 2018-10-31 20:36, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Wednesday, October 31, 2018 at 4:25:59 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
Snipped
I recently bought this, with matching pouch:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19

It appears to be almost indestructible but is too heavy for weight
weenies, over 7oz. I have it only for a few months but it already
saved the bacon twice, for other riders.

Snipped

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


So you FINALLY got a chain repair tool! Congratualtions! Now you
won't have to scrounge for a nail and rock to fix a chain whilst
moutain lions are stalking you.


Yes, and I had mentioned that here. You won't believe it but for the
garage I had one since several years because it came with a bike tool
set. This one happened to come with the M-19 tool. Not that I needed it
but the turn handle of the chain tool also has the spoke wrenches in it
and those I need.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #9  
Old November 1st 18, 03:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,554
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On 2018-11-01 05:33, Duane wrote:
On 31/10/2018 4:26 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-31 10:43, jbeattie wrote:
So I did this CLE speaking gig for the state bar, and they gave me a
little Amazon card that I used to buy myself these uber-cheap Nashbar
p-handle hex wrenches. https://tinyurl.com/y8rrfyuf (I got via Amazon
for the same price).



That link only produces a security warning here.


... What a great set of wrenches. I don't know how
I lived without these for so long, particularly with all the recessed
brake lever bolts these days. All this time I've been using long or
standard hex wrenches or hex multi wrenches like this:
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....PL._SX425_.jpg


I recently bought this, with matching pouch:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19

It appears to be almost indestructible but is too heavy for weight
weenies, over 7oz. I have it only for a few months but it already
saved the bacon twice, for other riders.


You mean like the weight weenies that told you to get a combination tool
rather than go looking for rocks and nails?


The ground-off nail was riding in my tool kit. That and the required
steel nut (for the otehr side of the chain) weighed a fraction of an ounce.


I have the same tool and don't find 175g too much to carry. But then
again, I don't have to make room for growlers and 4 lb tubes.


I don't mind either. Just mentioned it because when I used the tool the
other cyclists wanted to see it. The general consensus among them was
"It's very nice but too heavy".

The bike growler is largely retired because I have since started
home-brewing.


... The price was not crazy, either -- even with
postage. I threw it in last night, and it works like a charm. If I
break that part again, I think I would have to get it from some
re-seller in Japan or Germany. That's incredible for a lever that is
maybe two years out of date and for an alleged wear item. This is
now SOP with the constant product upgrades from Shimano. One pines
away for the days when nothing worked that well, but it didn't change
from year to year.


Yep, like my downtube friction shifters. I could always buy new ones
for just a few dollars but nothing breaks.


In my opinion, the single biggest improvement of modern bike tech has
been brifters. I can't imagine using downtube friction shifters now.
Even if replacements are expensive. I don't know though since I've
never replaced anything other than a cable.



Brifters are nice as long as you don't have to shift across the whole
cassette very fast. Like when almost having missed a turn off with an
immediate steep incline.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #10  
Old November 1st 18, 04:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,441
Default Nashbar P-Handle Wrenches -- and thank you Royal Mail

On Thursday, November 1, 2018 at 7:02:28 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-01 05:33, Duane wrote:
On 31/10/2018 4:26 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-10-31 10:43, jbeattie wrote:
So I did this CLE speaking gig for the state bar, and they gave me a
little Amazon card that I used to buy myself these uber-cheap Nashbar
p-handle hex wrenches. https://tinyurl.com/y8rrfyuf (I got via Amazon
for the same price).


That link only produces a security warning here.


... What a great set of wrenches. I don't know how
I lived without these for so long, particularly with all the recessed
brake lever bolts these days. All this time I've been using long or
standard hex wrenches or hex multi wrenches like this:
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon....PL._SX425_.jpg


I recently bought this, with matching pouch:

https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19

It appears to be almost indestructible but is too heavy for weight
weenies, over 7oz. I have it only for a few months but it already
saved the bacon twice, for other riders.


You mean like the weight weenies that told you to get a combination tool
rather than go looking for rocks and nails?


The ground-off nail was riding in my tool kit. That and the required
steel nut (for the otehr side of the chain) weighed a fraction of an ounce.


I have the same tool and don't find 175g too much to carry. But then
again, I don't have to make room for growlers and 4 lb tubes.


I don't mind either. Just mentioned it because when I used the tool the
other cyclists wanted to see it. The general consensus among them was
"It's very nice but too heavy".

The bike growler is largely retired because I have since started
home-brewing.


... The price was not crazy, either -- even with
postage. I threw it in last night, and it works like a charm. If I
break that part again, I think I would have to get it from some
re-seller in Japan or Germany. That's incredible for a lever that is
maybe two years out of date and for an alleged wear item. This is
now SOP with the constant product upgrades from Shimano. One pines
away for the days when nothing worked that well, but it didn't change
from year to year.


Yep, like my downtube friction shifters. I could always buy new ones
for just a few dollars but nothing breaks.


In my opinion, the single biggest improvement of modern bike tech has
been brifters. I can't imagine using downtube friction shifters now.
Even if replacements are expensive. I don't know though since I've
never replaced anything other than a cable.



Brifters are nice as long as you don't have to shift across the whole
cassette very fast. Like when almost having missed a turn off with an
immediate steep incline.


Oddly enough, everyone from champion DH and cross-country riders to TdF winners have migrated to brifters. Have raced with DT shifters and brifters, I can say with certainty the latter are better. I'm sure there is some situation that only you encounter on your super-gnarly trails and hair-raising roads that requires DT shifters, so Go Dog Go! Keep the DT shifter industry alive. BTW, I raced with both on this course: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrG12-aG_Xc multiple laps up a 23% climb -- a double shift that resulted in a giant compression back in the DT shifter days. Now look how smoothly it is accomplished. And with 11sp, a strong rider could big-ring it.

-- Jay Beattie.

 




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