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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #871  
Old December 25th 18, 04:04 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,264
Default AG: Storing bottles

On Sun, 16 Dec 2018 11:55:58 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

Good Lord! I wash my bike bottles as soon as I finish the ride.


I keep mine in a refrigerator. The garage is heated only by leakage
from the furnace/water-heater closet (which isn't particularly warm),
and by having two walls in common with the house. I keep my "root
cellar" (a paper lunch bag containing a quart-size paper-mache' berry
box of onion sets) against the back wall of a cupboard hanging on an
inside wall to be sure it doesn't freeze.

I'll be taking the bottle out of storage sooner than expected. On
Tuesday's ride, I warmed the bottles in the humidifier pot and put my
Sheriff Goshert bottle in the insulated pannier, and it was still hot
when I took it out, experiment a success.

In an excess of caution, I wrapped the bottle in a plastic grocery bag
first, and it's lucky that I did: the sack had a puddle of water in
it when I took the bottle out. So after I got home, I tossed it into
the recycling bin. The bottle, that is. I tossed the sack when I
passed Owen's. Together with a lot of the sacks I'd used to cushion
the lamp I left at the recycle depot, since I'd hit two stores on the
way to the depot, and ate half of a foot-long submarine on the way
back, and pannier space was getting a bit tight.

Sheriff Goshert stepped aside for Sheriff Dukes about the same time.

It was a few campaigns back that I picked up the bottle at a garage
sale, so it's done its duty.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

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  #872  
Old December 25th 18, 05:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 805
Default AG: Storing bottles

On Mon, 24 Dec 2018 23:04:03 -0500, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Sun, 16 Dec 2018 11:55:58 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

Good Lord! I wash my bike bottles as soon as I finish the ride.


I keep mine in a refrigerator. The garage is heated only by leakage
from the furnace/water-heater closet (which isn't particularly warm),
and by having two walls in common with the house. I keep my "root
cellar" (a paper lunch bag containing a quart-size paper-mache' berry
box of onion sets) against the back wall of a cupboard hanging on an
inside wall to be sure it doesn't freeze.


Well, as my bottles are normally empty when I get back to the house I
just wash them out and put them on the kitchen shelf till the next
time.

I'll be taking the bottle out of storage sooner than expected. On
Tuesday's ride, I warmed the bottles in the humidifier pot and put my
Sheriff Goshert bottle in the insulated pannier, and it was still hot
when I took it out, experiment a success.


I have an insulated (thermos) that I bought thinking I could carry
cold water on the hot days but it wasn't a real success as it didn't
fit the bottle cages very well and secondly it was kind of a pain in
the neck to have to stop, screw off the top and pour out a cup full.
The regular bike bottles you just squirt a mouthful :-)


In an excess of caution, I wrapped the bottle in a plastic grocery bag
first, and it's lucky that I did: the sack had a puddle of water in
it when I took the bottle out. So after I got home, I tossed it into
the recycling bin. The bottle, that is. I tossed the sack when I
passed Owen's. Together with a lot of the sacks I'd used to cushion
the lamp I left at the recycle depot, since I'd hit two stores on the
way to the depot, and ate half of a foot-long submarine on the way
back, and pannier space was getting a bit tight.

Sheriff Goshert stepped aside for Sheriff Dukes about the same time.

It was a few campaigns back that I picked up the bottle at a garage
sale, so it's done its duty.


I've been buying the cheap Chinese made bottles. I was initially a bit
apprehensive but after trying one they seem as strong as other bottles
and don't seem to have any "plastic smell" or taint the drink and they
are in the neighborhood of $3.00 each.

cheers,

John B.


  #873  
Old December 29th 18, 01:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,264
Default AG: Storing bottles

On Tue, 25 Dec 2018 12:05:36 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

I have an insulated (thermos) that I bought thinking I could carry
cold water on the hot days but it wasn't a real success as it didn't
fit the bottle cages very well and secondly it was kind of a pain in
the neck to have to stop, screw off the top and pour out a cup full.
The regular bike bottles you just squirt a mouthful :-)


I used to put ice and water in my insulated pannier, and re-fill the
bottom quarter of my front bottle at intervals. This helped with
hydration, because I was motivated to drink it before it got warm.

I've been buying the cheap Chinese made bottles. I was initially a bit
apprehensive but after trying one they seem as strong as other bottles
and don't seem to have any "plastic smell" or taint the drink and they
are in the neighborhood of $3.00 each.


I prefer the bottles made to be given away to the bottles sold at the
Trail House. The valve at the top of my purchased bottle has a
dirt-holding dent; the free bottles can be wiped clean with my thumb.
If I suspect a valve of being dirty, I squirt some water onto the
ground, but not having a little pit to keep dirt in appeals to me.

Also, all the advertising bottles that I've found at garage sales and
Goodwill have been standard size. That's probably a flaw in the eyes
of a beanpole, but for a sixty-two inch short-legged female, the extra
four-ounce bulb on top of most retail bottles is a deal breaker.

But most of the advertising bottles are opaque. My National Guard
bottles are translucent, but not very.

While I was typing, I remembered that I'd not taken a bottle out of
storage to replace the one I threw into the recycle bin. I found
three Goodwill bottles and one garage-sale bottle in the cupboard, all
clean and wrapped in paper towels to keep dust out, and three dirty
black bottles. One of the black bottles was in the cage it had come
with, which we took off the walk-behind lawn mower before we got rid
of it. I don't remember acquiring the other two. I took one of the
black bottles to put on the sink with other things to be washed the
next time I use the dishpan. While trying to force the valve to open
and close, I commented that I might throw that one into the recycle
bin too.

(I eventually did; the other black bottle appears to be quite
functional; I put water in it, turned it upside-down and squeezed, and
it didn't leak.)

My spouse commented that I ought to throw them all out and buy new
ones because the new ones seal better. I don't know how he knows
that. Typical that he said "throw out" first and "buy" afterward. I
never throw out the old one until I'm sure the new one works. Well,
once I gave away my kitchen funnel confident that I could go to the
dollar store and buy another. I eventually found one in an antique
shop.

#

I thought there was no hurry about cleaning the bottle, because I'd
carry just one bottle and refill it from a quart bottle of hot water
in my insulated pannier. But after I packed the bike for tomorrow's
dump tour both panniers were full of stuff I mean to leave at
Goodwill, and the prediction isn't much below freezing tomorrow. So I
rinsed out the dust, dipped the bottle in the humidifier pot to scald
it, and had at it with a bottle brush. The brush is stiffer than I
remembered it; I had trouble getting it out of the bottle -- perhaps I
should have used the larger brush I use on the wide-mouth bottles.


--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/






  #874  
Old December 29th 18, 02:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 805
Default AG: Storing bottles

On Fri, 28 Dec 2018 20:59:29 -0500, Joy Beeson
wrote:

On Tue, 25 Dec 2018 12:05:36 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

I have an insulated (thermos) that I bought thinking I could carry
cold water on the hot days but it wasn't a real success as it didn't
fit the bottle cages very well and secondly it was kind of a pain in
the neck to have to stop, screw off the top and pour out a cup full.
The regular bike bottles you just squirt a mouthful :-)


I used to put ice and water in my insulated pannier, and re-fill the
bottom quarter of my front bottle at intervals. This helped with
hydration, because I was motivated to drink it before it got warm.

I've been buying the cheap Chinese made bottles. I was initially a bit
apprehensive but after trying one they seem as strong as other bottles
and don't seem to have any "plastic smell" or taint the drink and they
are in the neighborhood of $3.00 each.


I prefer the bottles made to be given away to the bottles sold at the
Trail House. The valve at the top of my purchased bottle has a
dirt-holding dent; the free bottles can be wiped clean with my thumb.
If I suspect a valve of being dirty, I squirt some water onto the
ground, but not having a little pit to keep dirt in appeals to me.

Also, all the advertising bottles that I've found at garage sales and
Goodwill have been standard size. That's probably a flaw in the eyes
of a beanpole, but for a sixty-two inch short-legged female, the extra
four-ounce bulb on top of most retail bottles is a deal breaker.

But most of the advertising bottles are opaque. My National Guard
bottles are translucent, but not very.

While I was typing, I remembered that I'd not taken a bottle out of
storage to replace the one I threw into the recycle bin. I found
three Goodwill bottles and one garage-sale bottle in the cupboard, all
clean and wrapped in paper towels to keep dust out, and three dirty
black bottles. One of the black bottles was in the cage it had come
with, which we took off the walk-behind lawn mower before we got rid
of it. I don't remember acquiring the other two. I took one of the
black bottles to put on the sink with other things to be washed the
next time I use the dishpan. While trying to force the valve to open
and close, I commented that I might throw that one into the recycle
bin too.

(I eventually did; the other black bottle appears to be quite
functional; I put water in it, turned it upside-down and squeezed, and
it didn't leak.)

My spouse commented that I ought to throw them all out and buy new
ones because the new ones seal better. I don't know how he knows
that. Typical that he said "throw out" first and "buy" afterward. I
never throw out the old one until I'm sure the new one works. Well,
once I gave away my kitchen funnel confident that I could go to the
dollar store and buy another. I eventually found one in an antique
shop.


I'm glad that I live in a developing country where one can still buy
funnels. You can even buy a funnel to fill small plastic bags :-)

Having said that Thailand has announced a war on plastic bags. If you
bring your own shopping bag you actually get a discount on your
purchases.


#

I thought there was no hurry about cleaning the bottle, because I'd
carry just one bottle and refill it from a quart bottle of hot water
in my insulated pannier. But after I packed the bike for tomorrow's
dump tour both panniers were full of stuff I mean to leave at
Goodwill, and the prediction isn't much below freezing tomorrow. So I
rinsed out the dust, dipped the bottle in the humidifier pot to scald
it, and had at it with a bottle brush. The brush is stiffer than I
remembered it; I had trouble getting it out of the bottle -- perhaps I
should have used the larger brush I use on the wide-mouth bottles.


I once read a post, I think it might have been on a Singapore site,
that talked about washing bottles to "get the black crud out", which
is a bit unappetizing. They recommended putting some rice and water in
the bottle and shaking it. (un boiled rice, that is :-)

cheers,

John B.


  #875  
Old December 29th 18, 02:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,264
Default AG: Storing bottles

On Fri, 28 Dec 2018 20:59:29 -0500, Joy Beeson
wrote:

after I packed the bike for tomorrow's
dump tour


While I was putting my socks on, an ambulance crew radioed (egad, I
don't think that word *has* a spelling!) the hospital that they were
bringing in a cyclist who had slipped on the ice.

I's a-going anyway. I'm mostly on busy roads where the traffic will
keep the ice off, and I've walked the full length of the boardwalk
before.

And I'm really, really tired of spending the winter staring sadly at
the young boys riding by.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
  #876  
Old December 29th 18, 04:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,973
Default AG: Storing bottles

On 12/29/2018 9:22 AM, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Fri, 28 Dec 2018 20:59:29 -0500, Joy Beeson
wrote:

after I packed the bike for tomorrow's
dump tour


While I was putting my socks on, an ambulance crew radioed (egad, I
don't think that word *has* a spelling!) the hospital that they were
bringing in a cyclist who had slipped on the ice.


My wife and I took a longish walk around town yesterday. She almost fell
when we walked across a wood decked pedestrian/bicycle bridge. The wet
wood is just as slippery as ice. So are the layers of wet, rotting
leaves at the edges of many streets.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #877  
Old December 30th 18, 03:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,264
Default AG: Storing bottles

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 09:52:10 +0700, John B. Slocomb
wrote:

I'm glad that I live in a developing country where one can still buy
funnels. You can even buy a funnel to fill small plastic bags :-)


I insisted on buying a seamless funnel. I thought the seams on the
funnels then in fashion would be hard to keep clean.

There was still a joint between the narrow part and the wide part the
last time I looked; it's been long enough that I don't remember
whether there was still a vertical seam in each piece.

I suspect that there are seamless plastic funnels available, and
plastics have improved since my first plastic dishpan blistered into
dirt-holding pockets. Perhaps I should look around if I go into
Meijer today.

#

Did go into Meijer; didn't think about funnels.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
  #878  
Old December 30th 18, 03:36 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,264
Default AG: Storing bottles

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 11:29:14 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

She almost fell
when we walked across a wood decked pedestrian/bicycle bridge. The wet
wood is just as slippery as ice.


As slippery as melting ice! Seems to be a thin layer of slime that
rehydrates in the rain.

My bike slid out from under me on the boardwalk, but after I'd got one
foot firmly on the ground, so I ended up standing over it. Since my
glassware was firmly packed, the only harm was that I'd left the valve
on my water bottle open and I didn't notice until half of it had run
out. I had another bottle, so the primary harm of that is that it
left a puddle on an already-slick boardwalk.

When I rode across the boardwalk, when I got to the part that zig-zags
up out of the swamp, I decided that it was time to dismount. Lost the
bike while trying to get my right leg over the top tube. It was easy
to step clear of the frame once it was flat on the boards, but that is
not my favorite way to dismount.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
  #879  
Old January 6th 19, 01:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,264
Default AG: Wierd Cycling Tools



At this time of year, my comb becomes essential to riding a bike.

I shed like a cat, and long hair is very hard on vacuum cleaners, so I
comb outdoors whenever I can. When preparing for a ride, I'll put on
all but one layer before combing my hair. If I can stay outside long
enough to get all the tangles out, one more layer is enough.

Sometimes the wind whips tangles in faster than I can comb them out
and I have to go to the garage to finish, but I usually have a pretty
good idea of how much clothing I'm wearing by then.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
  #880  
Old January 13th 19, 03:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,264
Default AG: Hokey Smoke is it Saturday Already?


I'll write something tomorrow.

--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


 




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