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  #131  
Old March 11th 19, 05:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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On Monday, March 11, 2019 at 8:42:18 AM UTC-7, Rolf Mantel wrote:
Am 07.03.2019 um 23:38 schrieb :
I don't think that there is a road in the world that isn't marked at the intersections.
Tom, you must not get out much.


I didn't have any trouble in Europe. I didn't have any trouble in almost all of the western USA.


It all depends on what types of roads you pick. Road signs are usually
good enough if you only wish to reach a certain place (if you are able
to guess from the map whether the destination on the sign is going to be
the next village one mile up or a large town 30 miles up) but often not
good enough if you wish to take a certain route (avoid/pick the mountain
road rather than the flat road).


In Utah there are MANY ghost towns. I've seen some that appeared to be from the 1800's mining towns almost entirely gone. So it is easy to miss a town that is shown on a map.
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  #132  
Old March 11th 19, 05:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Rolf Mantel[_2_]
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Am 08.03.2019 um 19:03 schrieb Frank Krygowski:

For my limited bicycle riding, I don't really need a map.


I don't understand these problems.

Our county engineer gives away free maps.


A simple example for trips where GPS comes useful is one I took with my
son a while ago.

Plan was: take the train to a small town in the next state (Hessen),
follow a river trail for some 20 miles (or maybe more) and see how to
come home from there by train.

When we reached our minimal distance at lunchtime, my son agreed to go
on, but following some trail signs through the forest rather than along
the river, reaching the third state (Bavaria, for which I had no offline
map) mid-afternoon. From there, follow another river trail downhill
"for a bit", and upon seeing a sign to Frankfurt "Oh, let's got There",
turning a 20 miles planned trip spontaneously into a 65 mile trip in
unknown territory...
  #133  
Old March 12th 19, 04:38 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joy Beeson
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On Mon, 11 Mar 2019 17:24:28 +0100, Rolf Mantel
wrote:

When we reached our minimal distance at lunchtime, my son agreed to go
on, but following some trail signs through the forest rather than along
the river, reaching the third state (Bavaria, for which I had no offline
map) mid-afternoon. From there, follow another river trail downhill
"for a bit", and upon seeing a sign to Frankfurt "Oh, let's got There",
turning a 20 miles planned trip spontaneously into a 65 mile trip in
unknown territory...


I used to carry a regional map for those situations. Gave it up when
going thirty miles in one day became a major achievement -- not to
mention that I was unable to replace my map collection after we
retired and moved to my spouse's home town.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

  #134  
Old March 12th 19, 04:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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On Monday, March 11, 2019 at 9:24:30 AM UTC-7, Rolf Mantel wrote:
Am 08.03.2019 um 19:03 schrieb Frank Krygowski:

For my limited bicycle riding, I don't really need a map.


I don't understand these problems.

Our county engineer gives away free maps.


A simple example for trips where GPS comes useful is one I took with my
son a while ago.

Plan was: take the train to a small town in the next state (Hessen),
follow a river trail for some 20 miles (or maybe more) and see how to
come home from there by train.

When we reached our minimal distance at lunchtime, my son agreed to go
on, but following some trail signs through the forest rather than along
the river, reaching the third state (Bavaria, for which I had no offline
map) mid-afternoon. From there, follow another river trail downhill
"for a bit", and upon seeing a sign to Frankfurt "Oh, let's got There",
turning a 20 miles planned trip spontaneously into a 65 mile trip in
unknown territory...


But as a country with good train service to most important destinations you always have the alternative of asking directions at any train station or taking a train back.
  #135  
Old March 12th 19, 05:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Rolf Mantel[_2_]
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Am 12.03.2019 um 16:49 schrieb :
But as a country with good train service to most important
destinations you always have the alternative of asking directions at
any train station or taking a train back.


Sure, this safety net is quite luxurious. Knowing I only need to go
west 10 miles into one river valley or east 15 miles into another river
valley and a train at least once per hour allowed me to take the risk of
barging through the hills without preparation, leaving the only risk
that I get onto a wrong logging road u-turning at the side of a hill;
worst case is that instead of 15 miles and 300m altitude gain to the
next small town I double up after 10 and have 20 miles and 500m altitude
gain to end up back where I've started.

A look once every few miles onto the GPS-based map on the mobile phone
removes that risk as well.

In Minnesota 1996, I had a similar but not quite so luxurious safety
net: the road numbering system streching out into all directions more
than a day trip:

If I got lost I just had to follow any road to the next junction
containing a road name (e.g. 135 Ave NW), I "only" had to follow some 15
miles into the direction of smaller road numbers, turn right as soon as
it changed its name to 'NE' and find my way back home to the city center
without a map, maps only being necessary to find a pretty route.

Rolf
  #136  
Old March 12th 19, 05:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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On 3/12/2019 12:11 PM, Rolf Mantel wrote:

In Minnesota 1996, I had a similar but not quite so luxurious safety
net: the road numbering system streching out into all directions more
than a day trip:

If I got lost I just had to follow any road to the next junction
containing a road name (e.g. 135 Ave NW), I "only" had to follow some 15
miles into the direction of smaller road numbers, turn right as soon as
it changed its name to 'NE' and find my way back home to the city center
without a map, maps only being necessary to find a pretty route.


Minnesota is one of the states with extremely large areas where the
roads form a grid made of straight lines. That does make navigation
easy. Those areas also tend to be fairly flat.

In hillier areas, roads often wiggle and branch off unpredictably to
follow valleys. It makes for much more interesting riding, but trickier
navigation.

--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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