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  #1  
Old March 7th 19, 06:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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The hot water had slowed to a very light stream full on in the kitchen. I dug around and found a bucket that would fit under the sink. The facet is one of the new kind that passes both hot and cold and anything in between by rotation of the level and velocity by lifting the lever.

I turned off the hot water valve, pulled the hose off and placed it in the bucket and turned the cold water on and rotated it to a position in which the hot and cold would mix. The high pressure cold water flowed through the hit water hose and blew a bunch of fairly large stones out of the entire hot water passageway.

I was sort of worried that there cold be some stuck in the valve as well but reassembled the hot water pressure and flow rate is back up to the same as the cold water rate.

So I didn't have to crawl under the sink to take the entire plastic hose off, turn the house water off and remove the hot water valve and clean it or replace the entire sink valve with stones too deeply embedded in the narrow piping to be retrieved.

Sometimes things work out well and other times we have to listen to Frank.....
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  #2  
Old March 7th 19, 06:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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On 3/7/2019 11:21 AM, wrote:
The hot water had slowed to a very light stream full on in the kitchen. I dug around and found a bucket that would fit under the sink. The facet is one of the new kind that passes both hot and cold and anything in between by rotation of the level and velocity by lifting the lever.

I turned off the hot water valve, pulled the hose off and placed it in the bucket and turned the cold water on and rotated it to a position in which the hot and cold would mix. The high pressure cold water flowed through the hit water hose and blew a bunch of fairly large stones out of the entire hot water passageway.

I was sort of worried that there cold be some stuck in the valve as well but reassembled the hot water pressure and flow rate is back up to the same as the cold water rate.

So I didn't have to crawl under the sink to take the entire plastic hose off, turn the house water off and remove the hot water valve and clean it or replace the entire sink valve with stones too deeply embedded in the narrow piping to be retrieved.

Sometimes things work out well and other times we have to listen to Frank....


Sounds like victory!
Speaking as a guy who's generally suspicious of many modern
'improvements', I just love flexible supply tubes.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #3  
Old March 7th 19, 07:18 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 9:59:25 AM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/7/2019 11:21 AM, wrote:
The hot water had slowed to a very light stream full on in the kitchen. I dug around and found a bucket that would fit under the sink. The facet is one of the new kind that passes both hot and cold and anything in between by rotation of the level and velocity by lifting the lever.

I turned off the hot water valve, pulled the hose off and placed it in the bucket and turned the cold water on and rotated it to a position in which the hot and cold would mix. The high pressure cold water flowed through the hit water hose and blew a bunch of fairly large stones out of the entire hot water passageway.

I was sort of worried that there cold be some stuck in the valve as well but reassembled the hot water pressure and flow rate is back up to the same as the cold water rate.

So I didn't have to crawl under the sink to take the entire plastic hose off, turn the house water off and remove the hot water valve and clean it or replace the entire sink valve with stones too deeply embedded in the narrow piping to be retrieved.

Sometimes things work out well and other times we have to listen to Frank....


Sounds like victory!
Speaking as a guy who's generally suspicious of many modern
'improvements', I just love flexible supply tubes.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I think that I originally had my mother's kitchen completely rebuilt. Everything is about the correct age for it and the compressed wood cabinets are beginning to have problems. I can't remember that time much but my wife tells me about the things I did. Near the end when my mother got sick again I paid for a care facility. I paid almost a million for her cancer surgery back when it was considered research and insurance wouldn't pay for it. And when she moved into this place and the cost wasn't covered by the sale of her fourplex I paid the difference. Though I can't remember what it was it must have been substantial since she left the house to me instead of my older brother.

It is the ****s that the important things are gone out of my memory but I can remember so many unimportant ones. I can't remember living on my sailboat but I can remember being a watch captain and navigator racing large sailboats down the coast. I can remember dolphins dancing on the bow wave but not the faces and names of my good friends at my yacht club. Though if I walk out there onto the back porch it's all "HEY TOM!"

I am asked if I can do electronic designs and I pick up a book and it looks like I wrote it. Just glancing at a lot of circuitry I can spot errors. I was programming in C and someone wanted C++. I picked up the book and barely glanced at it and remembered the differences and updated the program in a hour.

But I can't remember my father dying. Nor, for that matter, any of my family members.

You really do not want to get a serious concussion.
  #4  
Old March 7th 19, 10:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,706
Default Now Back In Ho****er

On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 9:59:25 AM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/7/2019 11:21 AM, wrote:
The hot water had slowed to a very light stream full on in the kitchen. I dug around and found a bucket that would fit under the sink. The facet is one of the new kind that passes both hot and cold and anything in between by rotation of the level and velocity by lifting the lever.

I turned off the hot water valve, pulled the hose off and placed it in the bucket and turned the cold water on and rotated it to a position in which the hot and cold would mix. The high pressure cold water flowed through the hit water hose and blew a bunch of fairly large stones out of the entire hot water passageway.

I was sort of worried that there cold be some stuck in the valve as well but reassembled the hot water pressure and flow rate is back up to the same as the cold water rate.

So I didn't have to crawl under the sink to take the entire plastic hose off, turn the house water off and remove the hot water valve and clean it or replace the entire sink valve with stones too deeply embedded in the narrow piping to be retrieved.

Sometimes things work out well and other times we have to listen to Frank....


Sounds like victory!
Speaking as a guy who's generally suspicious of many modern
'improvements', I just love flexible supply tubes.


As for improvements, PEX beats the hell out of soldering copper unless you love to solder copper. I have a go-no-go device for clamp rings.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Apollo-3...010C/301921125 Easy-peasy, except the SS clamps aren't cheap.

If Tom is having a problem with only the hot water side, then his hot water heater is on the way out. It's probably banging with sediment and producing rust.

I re-did about a third of the piping in my house with copper as part of a bathroom remodel, and one of the high points of my life was when the inspector spontaneously commented on how clean the joints were. None have blown-up yet, which is the thing I worry about. The true artisan solderer was the guy who did the work on my hot water radiant system when the new boiler went in. Massive copper pipes going to distribution manifolds. Gorgeous joints. Just the pipe lay out with all the mixing valves and pumps and circuits is a thing of beauty. Every time I work on that system, I get a sinking feeling and think "WTF am I doing?" My wife just says it out loud. I'm going to have a professional look at it next time around.

-- Jay Beattie.



  #5  
Old March 7th 19, 11:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 1,097
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On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 1:09:11 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 9:59:25 AM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/7/2019 11:21 AM, wrote:
The hot water had slowed to a very light stream full on in the kitchen. I dug around and found a bucket that would fit under the sink. The facet is one of the new kind that passes both hot and cold and anything in between by rotation of the level and velocity by lifting the lever.

I turned off the hot water valve, pulled the hose off and placed it in the bucket and turned the cold water on and rotated it to a position in which the hot and cold would mix. The high pressure cold water flowed through the hit water hose and blew a bunch of fairly large stones out of the entire hot water passageway.

I was sort of worried that there cold be some stuck in the valve as well but reassembled the hot water pressure and flow rate is back up to the same as the cold water rate.

So I didn't have to crawl under the sink to take the entire plastic hose off, turn the house water off and remove the hot water valve and clean it or replace the entire sink valve with stones too deeply embedded in the narrow piping to be retrieved.

Sometimes things work out well and other times we have to listen to Frank....


Sounds like victory!
Speaking as a guy who's generally suspicious of many modern
'improvements', I just love flexible supply tubes.


As for improvements, PEX beats the hell out of soldering copper unless you love to solder copper. I have a go-no-go device for clamp rings.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Apollo-3...010C/301921125 Easy-peasy, except the SS clamps aren't cheap.

If Tom is having a problem with only the hot water side, then his hot water heater is on the way out. It's probably banging with sediment and producing rust.

I re-did about a third of the piping in my house with copper as part of a bathroom remodel, and one of the high points of my life was when the inspector spontaneously commented on how clean the joints were. None have blown-up yet, which is the thing I worry about. The true artisan solderer was the guy who did the work on my hot water radiant system when the new boiler went in. Massive copper pipes going to distribution manifolds. Gorgeous joints. Just the pipe lay out with all the mixing valves and pumps and circuits is a thing of beauty. Every time I work on that system, I get a sinking feeling and think "WTF am I doing?" My wife just says it out loud. I'm going to have a professional look at it next time around.

-- Jay Beattie.


It has nothing to do with the hot water heater. This all started during our drought about five years ago when they started worrying about Hetch-hetchy running low and San Francisco stopped selling excess water to the surrounding communities.

We started using our local (HUGE) reservoir and since the piping systems was little used it was filled with mud and small stones. The cold water part of the system cleans itself out with garden hoses and the like that can pass all of this stuff. But hot water systems all go through much smaller tubing - Showers and sinks etc. These trap the small stones and you have to clean them out occasionally. The same thing happens to the sink cold water system. I have a aerator/filter nozzle and it has to be removed regularly and the small stones cleaned out.

I don't know if the water system will ever work properly ever again because the aging water pipes in this part of town were installed in 1944 and the population is presently 40 times what it was then and the same water pipes are there. So the pressure is a great deal lower than it should be.
  #6  
Old March 8th 19, 12:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,706
Default Now Back In Ho****er

On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 2:16:00 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 1:09:11 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 9:59:25 AM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/7/2019 11:21 AM, wrote:
The hot water had slowed to a very light stream full on in the kitchen. I dug around and found a bucket that would fit under the sink. The facet is one of the new kind that passes both hot and cold and anything in between by rotation of the level and velocity by lifting the lever.

I turned off the hot water valve, pulled the hose off and placed it in the bucket and turned the cold water on and rotated it to a position in which the hot and cold would mix. The high pressure cold water flowed through the hit water hose and blew a bunch of fairly large stones out of the entire hot water passageway.

I was sort of worried that there cold be some stuck in the valve as well but reassembled the hot water pressure and flow rate is back up to the same as the cold water rate.

So I didn't have to crawl under the sink to take the entire plastic hose off, turn the house water off and remove the hot water valve and clean it or replace the entire sink valve with stones too deeply embedded in the narrow piping to be retrieved.

Sometimes things work out well and other times we have to listen to Frank....


Sounds like victory!
Speaking as a guy who's generally suspicious of many modern
'improvements', I just love flexible supply tubes.


As for improvements, PEX beats the hell out of soldering copper unless you love to solder copper. I have a go-no-go device for clamp rings.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Apollo-3...010C/301921125 Easy-peasy, except the SS clamps aren't cheap.

If Tom is having a problem with only the hot water side, then his hot water heater is on the way out. It's probably banging with sediment and producing rust.

I re-did about a third of the piping in my house with copper as part of a bathroom remodel, and one of the high points of my life was when the inspector spontaneously commented on how clean the joints were. None have blown-up yet, which is the thing I worry about. The true artisan solderer was the guy who did the work on my hot water radiant system when the new boiler went in. Massive copper pipes going to distribution manifolds. Gorgeous joints. Just the pipe lay out with all the mixing valves and pumps and circuits is a thing of beauty. Every time I work on that system, I get a sinking feeling and think "WTF am I doing?" My wife just says it out loud. I'm going to have a professional look at it next time around.

-- Jay Beattie.


It has nothing to do with the hot water heater. This all started during our drought about five years ago when they started worrying about Hetch-hetchy running low and San Francisco stopped selling excess water to the surrounding communities.

We started using our local (HUGE) reservoir and since the piping systems was little used it was filled with mud and small stones. The cold water part of the system cleans itself out with garden hoses and the like that can pass all of this stuff. But hot water systems all go through much smaller tubing - Showers and sinks etc. These trap the small stones and you have to clean them out occasionally. The same thing happens to the sink cold water system. I have a aerator/filter nozzle and it has to be removed regularly and the small stones cleaned out.


Pipe sizing for hot is the same as cold, although service to a cold hose bib may be 3/4" rather than 1/2", but both are plenty big enough to pass sediment.


I don't know if the water system will ever work properly ever again because the aging water pipes in this part of town were installed in 1944 and the population is presently 40 times what it was then and the same water pipes are there. So the pressure is a great deal lower than it should be.


You should get a whole house filter or a trap of some sort.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #7  
Old March 8th 19, 06:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 1,097
Default Now Back In Ho****er

On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 3:10:29 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 2:16:00 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 1:09:11 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 9:59:25 AM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/7/2019 11:21 AM, wrote:
The hot water had slowed to a very light stream full on in the kitchen. I dug around and found a bucket that would fit under the sink. The facet is one of the new kind that passes both hot and cold and anything in between by rotation of the level and velocity by lifting the lever.

I turned off the hot water valve, pulled the hose off and placed it in the bucket and turned the cold water on and rotated it to a position in which the hot and cold would mix. The high pressure cold water flowed through the hit water hose and blew a bunch of fairly large stones out of the entire hot water passageway.

I was sort of worried that there cold be some stuck in the valve as well but reassembled the hot water pressure and flow rate is back up to the same as the cold water rate.

So I didn't have to crawl under the sink to take the entire plastic hose off, turn the house water off and remove the hot water valve and clean it or replace the entire sink valve with stones too deeply embedded in the narrow piping to be retrieved.

Sometimes things work out well and other times we have to listen to Frank....


Sounds like victory!
Speaking as a guy who's generally suspicious of many modern
'improvements', I just love flexible supply tubes.

As for improvements, PEX beats the hell out of soldering copper unless you love to solder copper. I have a go-no-go device for clamp rings.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Apollo-3...010C/301921125 Easy-peasy, except the SS clamps aren't cheap.

If Tom is having a problem with only the hot water side, then his hot water heater is on the way out. It's probably banging with sediment and producing rust.

I re-did about a third of the piping in my house with copper as part of a bathroom remodel, and one of the high points of my life was when the inspector spontaneously commented on how clean the joints were. None have blown-up yet, which is the thing I worry about. The true artisan solderer was the guy who did the work on my hot water radiant system when the new boiler went in. Massive copper pipes going to distribution manifolds. Gorgeous joints. Just the pipe lay out with all the mixing valves and pumps and circuits is a thing of beauty. Every time I work on that system, I get a sinking feeling and think "WTF am I doing?" My wife just says it out loud. I'm going to have a professional look at it next time around.

-- Jay Beattie.


It has nothing to do with the hot water heater. This all started during our drought about five years ago when they started worrying about Hetch-hetchy running low and San Francisco stopped selling excess water to the surrounding communities.

We started using our local (HUGE) reservoir and since the piping systems was little used it was filled with mud and small stones. The cold water part of the system cleans itself out with garden hoses and the like that can pass all of this stuff. But hot water systems all go through much smaller tubing - Showers and sinks etc. These trap the small stones and you have to clean them out occasionally. The same thing happens to the sink cold water system. I have a aerator/filter nozzle and it has to be removed regularly and the small stones cleaned out.


Pipe sizing for hot is the same as cold, although service to a cold hose bib may be 3/4" rather than 1/2", but both are plenty big enough to pass sediment.


I don't know if the water system will ever work properly ever again because the aging water pipes in this part of town were installed in 1944 and the population is presently 40 times what it was then and the same water pipes are there. So the pressure is a great deal lower than it should be.


You should get a whole house filter or a trap of some sort.

-- Jay Beattie.


So you have a kitchen sink that uses 1/2" or 3/4" tubing. That must be some water system. Or didn't you understand what I was saying?
  #8  
Old March 8th 19, 08:37 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,706
Default Now Back In Ho****er

On Friday, March 8, 2019 at 9:48:17 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 3:10:29 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 2:16:00 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 1:09:11 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 9:59:25 AM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/7/2019 11:21 AM, wrote:
The hot water had slowed to a very light stream full on in the kitchen. I dug around and found a bucket that would fit under the sink. The facet is one of the new kind that passes both hot and cold and anything in between by rotation of the level and velocity by lifting the lever.

I turned off the hot water valve, pulled the hose off and placed it in the bucket and turned the cold water on and rotated it to a position in which the hot and cold would mix. The high pressure cold water flowed through the hit water hose and blew a bunch of fairly large stones out of the entire hot water passageway.

I was sort of worried that there cold be some stuck in the valve as well but reassembled the hot water pressure and flow rate is back up to the same as the cold water rate.

So I didn't have to crawl under the sink to take the entire plastic hose off, turn the house water off and remove the hot water valve and clean it or replace the entire sink valve with stones too deeply embedded in the narrow piping to be retrieved.

Sometimes things work out well and other times we have to listen to Frank....


Sounds like victory!
Speaking as a guy who's generally suspicious of many modern
'improvements', I just love flexible supply tubes.

As for improvements, PEX beats the hell out of soldering copper unless you love to solder copper. I have a go-no-go device for clamp rings.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Apollo-3...010C/301921125 Easy-peasy, except the SS clamps aren't cheap.

If Tom is having a problem with only the hot water side, then his hot water heater is on the way out. It's probably banging with sediment and producing rust.

I re-did about a third of the piping in my house with copper as part of a bathroom remodel, and one of the high points of my life was when the inspector spontaneously commented on how clean the joints were. None have blown-up yet, which is the thing I worry about. The true artisan solderer was the guy who did the work on my hot water radiant system when the new boiler went in. Massive copper pipes going to distribution manifolds. Gorgeous joints. Just the pipe lay out with all the mixing valves and pumps and circuits is a thing of beauty. Every time I work on that system, I get a sinking feeling and think "WTF am I doing?" My wife just says it out loud. I'm going to have a professional look at it next time around.

-- Jay Beattie.

It has nothing to do with the hot water heater. This all started during our drought about five years ago when they started worrying about Hetch-hetchy running low and San Francisco stopped selling excess water to the surrounding communities.

We started using our local (HUGE) reservoir and since the piping systems was little used it was filled with mud and small stones. The cold water part of the system cleans itself out with garden hoses and the like that can pass all of this stuff. But hot water systems all go through much smaller tubing - Showers and sinks etc. These trap the small stones and you have to clean them out occasionally. The same thing happens to the sink cold water system. I have a aerator/filter nozzle and it has to be removed regularly and the small stones cleaned out.


Pipe sizing for hot is the same as cold, although service to a cold hose bib may be 3/4" rather than 1/2", but both are plenty big enough to pass sediment.


I don't know if the water system will ever work properly ever again because the aging water pipes in this part of town were installed in 1944 and the population is presently 40 times what it was then and the same water pipes are there. So the pressure is a great deal lower than it should be.


You should get a whole house filter or a trap of some sort.

-- Jay Beattie.


So you have a kitchen sink that uses 1/2" or 3/4" tubing. That must be some water system. Or didn't you understand what I was saying?


Service to my kitchen sink is beautifully soldered 1/2" copper done by yours truly -- drilled through a cabinet base and tied into the main run to that side of the house. The rest of the house is dying 1951 galvanized.

From the under-sink service to the fixture is braided SS tube, both sides the same and either OD 3/8" or 1/2". I don't remember what I put in there. The deal is that both are the same. There is no different pipe or supply tubing difference for hot and cold. Both should clog the same unless your hot water heater or hot water pipes have issues. The pinch point in most faucets is the supply valve, which has a much narrower opening than the supply tubing and, of course, the aerator/filter. I don't know how you could get clogged supply tubing, but then again, the world is an amazing place. With all the rocks and sediment in your water, the inside of your toilet tank must look like a river bottom.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #9  
Old March 8th 19, 08:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
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Posts: 1,302
Default Now Back In Ho****er

jbeattie wrote:
:Service to my kitchen sink is beautifully soldered 1/2" copper done by yours truly -- drilled through a cabinet base and tied into the main run to that side of the house. The rest of the house is dying 1951 galvanized.

:From the under-sink service to the fixture is braided SS tube, both sides the same and either OD 3/8" or 1/2". I don't remember what I put in there. The deal is that both are the same. There is no different pipe or supply tubing difference for hot and cold. Both should clog the same unless your hot water heater or hot water pipes have issues. The pinch point in most faucets is the supply valve, which has a much narrower opening than the supply tubing and, of course, the aerator/filter. I don't know how you could get clogged supply tubing, but then again, the world is an amazing place. With all the rocks and sediment in your water, the inside of your toilet tank must look like a river bottom.

My house has largely galavanized pipes, installed in the 20s
(presumably). I have replaced some of it with copper, but it's hard
to get at the rest. I have had to replace a faucet supply line or two
(the flexible piece between the stop valve and the faucet.), because
they have plugged up. I assume the debris is the insdie of the pipes
coming off (or rather, the crud stuck to the inside of the pipes
coming off.)


--
sig 59
  #10  
Old March 8th 19, 09:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,097
Default Now Back In Ho****er

On Friday, March 8, 2019 at 11:37:24 AM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, March 8, 2019 at 9:48:17 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 3:10:29 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 2:16:00 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 1:09:11 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, March 7, 2019 at 9:59:25 AM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/7/2019 11:21 AM, wrote:
The hot water had slowed to a very light stream full on in the kitchen. I dug around and found a bucket that would fit under the sink. The facet is one of the new kind that passes both hot and cold and anything in between by rotation of the level and velocity by lifting the lever.

I turned off the hot water valve, pulled the hose off and placed it in the bucket and turned the cold water on and rotated it to a position in which the hot and cold would mix. The high pressure cold water flowed through the hit water hose and blew a bunch of fairly large stones out of the entire hot water passageway.

I was sort of worried that there cold be some stuck in the valve as well but reassembled the hot water pressure and flow rate is back up to the same as the cold water rate.

So I didn't have to crawl under the sink to take the entire plastic hose off, turn the house water off and remove the hot water valve and clean it or replace the entire sink valve with stones too deeply embedded in the narrow piping to be retrieved.

Sometimes things work out well and other times we have to listen to Frank....


Sounds like victory!
Speaking as a guy who's generally suspicious of many modern
'improvements', I just love flexible supply tubes.

As for improvements, PEX beats the hell out of soldering copper unless you love to solder copper. I have a go-no-go device for clamp rings.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Apollo-3...010C/301921125 Easy-peasy, except the SS clamps aren't cheap.

If Tom is having a problem with only the hot water side, then his hot water heater is on the way out. It's probably banging with sediment and producing rust.

I re-did about a third of the piping in my house with copper as part of a bathroom remodel, and one of the high points of my life was when the inspector spontaneously commented on how clean the joints were. None have blown-up yet, which is the thing I worry about. The true artisan solderer was the guy who did the work on my hot water radiant system when the new boiler went in. Massive copper pipes going to distribution manifolds. Gorgeous joints. Just the pipe lay out with all the mixing valves and pumps and circuits is a thing of beauty. Every time I work on that system, I get a sinking feeling and think "WTF am I doing?" My wife just says it out loud.. I'm going to have a professional look at it next time around.

-- Jay Beattie.

It has nothing to do with the hot water heater. This all started during our drought about five years ago when they started worrying about Hetch-hetchy running low and San Francisco stopped selling excess water to the surrounding communities.

We started using our local (HUGE) reservoir and since the piping systems was little used it was filled with mud and small stones. The cold water part of the system cleans itself out with garden hoses and the like that can pass all of this stuff. But hot water systems all go through much smaller tubing - Showers and sinks etc. These trap the small stones and you have to clean them out occasionally. The same thing happens to the sink cold water system. I have a aerator/filter nozzle and it has to be removed regularly and the small stones cleaned out.

Pipe sizing for hot is the same as cold, although service to a cold hose bib may be 3/4" rather than 1/2", but both are plenty big enough to pass sediment.


I don't know if the water system will ever work properly ever again because the aging water pipes in this part of town were installed in 1944 and the population is presently 40 times what it was then and the same water pipes are there. So the pressure is a great deal lower than it should be.

You should get a whole house filter or a trap of some sort.

-- Jay Beattie.


So you have a kitchen sink that uses 1/2" or 3/4" tubing. That must be some water system. Or didn't you understand what I was saying?


Service to my kitchen sink is beautifully soldered 1/2" copper done by yours truly -- drilled through a cabinet base and tied into the main run to that side of the house. The rest of the house is dying 1951 galvanized.

From the under-sink service to the fixture is braided SS tube, both sides the same and either OD 3/8" or 1/2". I don't remember what I put in there.. The deal is that both are the same. There is no different pipe or supply tubing difference for hot and cold. Both should clog the same unless your hot water heater or hot water pipes have issues. The pinch point in most faucets is the supply valve, which has a much narrower opening than the supply tubing and, of course, the aerator/filter. I don't know how you could get clogged supply tubing, but then again, the world is an amazing place. With all the rocks and sediment in your water, the inside of your toilet tank must look like a river bottom.

-- Jay Beattie.


That's what I have, but from the main valve to the sink faucets is a 3/16" line.

When they first shifted over to local supplies the water ran brown for a couple of weeks and everyone bought bottled water to drink or cook with. After it ran clean the taste was bad enough that you couldn't drink it even to take a pill.

After they switched back to Hetch Hetchy water it was even more noticeable the difference in taste. Since the main SL watershed reservoir is clean, it had to be the lines that were all screwed up.
 




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