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The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights forBicycles.



 
 
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  #91  
Old March 25th 17, 10:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,582
Default The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights for Bicycles.

On Saturday, March 25, 2017 at 3:34:37 PM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/25/2017 1:31 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Saturday, March 25, 2017 at 1:16:17 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 20:40:36 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 3/24/2017 8:11 PM, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 11:18:58 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Friday, March 24, 2017 at 1:36:54 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 3/24/2017 11:35 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
... I rarely ride at night, giving
the impression that I don't own a bicycle headlight. Given my
speculation that a majority of the bicycling world follows a similar
operating paradigm, the general impression would be that few riders
own a bicycle headlight.

Many lower-end bikes come with stickers saying "Never Ride at Night."
Surely, such "Danger! Danger!" warnings affect people's behavior.


--
- Frank Krygowski

Or maybe they just forgot to add a line saying "...without using an approved bicycle light or reflectors". Without the warning not to ride at night the bicycle manufacturer and the store are both open to being sued when some idiot without lights or even reflectors rides at night on a dark road and gets hit.

Cheers

Years ago I bought a Greg LeMond frame and built up a road bike. The
frame came with small, arrow shaped decals near the dropouts, saying
"Failure to tighten this bolt may cause loss of the wheel".

Together with the "Never ride at night" decals that Frank mentions and
your warning about being sued, it probably demonstrates the level of
intelligence that others perceive bicyclists to have.

After all, they have to be told repeatedly, over and over again, to
always wear those helmets that will save their lives, to use the
asphalt melting bright lights, that tiny little flashing lights will
make them 32% safer.

Good Lord! Can these people be bright enough to be out alone? Riding
on public roads?

Perhaps if we could limit bicycle riding so that it takes place only
on approved pathways, never at night, and only under the supervision
of a trained supervisor we could stop the carnage on the roads caused
by these two wheeled killers.
--
Cheers,

John B.


I've mentioned this case before here on RBT.

My very good friend's company was sued after an underage
thief was killed crossing an Interstate (pedestrians and
cyclists prohibited) with a freshly stolen bicycle. The open
QR front wheel fell out when he came up out of the ditch
onto a traffic lane. The attorney for the mother of said
miscreant argued that while Schwinns in his store had "do
not ride at night" stickers and also "do not ride without
properly securing wheel quick release" stickers, the brand
in question lacked both. The jury opined that the bicycles
we imported were nonconforming to 'accepted industry standards'.

My personal opinion is that U.S. courts have perpetrated some
extremely illogical rulings on the population.

An individual orders a cup of hot coffee. They are served a cup of hot
coffee. They then accept and pay for the cup of hot coffee and carry
it away. Subsequently they spill the hot coffee on themselves and it
is determined that it was the people who brewed the coffee that were
at fault.

Now you tell the story about the chap that steals a bicycle and it is
the seller who is at fault that he gets run over.

Here we don't have jury trials which means that one has to convince a
trained jurist that you are correct and I do not believe that they
will accept the premise that not tightening the axle nuts on a bicycle
sitting in your shop is the cause of a bicycle thief crashing. Nor
that spilling hot coffee on yourself is someone else's fault :-)

I suppose that ultimately someone will steal a bicycle and when caught
with the stolen goods, tried, convicted and sentenced, will than sue
the manufacturer of the bicycle since logically if "they" hadn't made
the bicycle it couldn't have been stolen....

It is obvious that "reality" in the U.S. is significantly different
than the rest of the world.


The OLD lady bought the coffee, set it between her legs as she sat on the front passenger seat of the stopped car in the drive-thru lane. Then she removed the lid of the coffee. The driver drove forwards which caused the very hot coffee to spill and scald her in a very sensitive region of her anatomy. IMHO, the fault was due to three people, #1, the woman for putting the hot coffe between her legs and then removing the lid, #2, her son for putting the car into motion whilst his mother had the opened coffee cup between her legs and lastly #3, the store for selling what the courts determined was OVERLY hot coffee.



You emphasize the word 'old' and yet most teenagers have
learned that hot coffee is hot. Maybe 'old' is not such a
critical factor here.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I emphasized the word 'old' because I'm pretty certain that the judge gave the payout he did due to her age and to where the injury was located. then again you'd think that her younger son who was the driver at the time would have had more sense than to putt he car into motion whilst an opened cup of coffee was sitting btween his mother's legs. Had the coffee cup lid been on the cup the hot coffee would not have spilled. Had the woman not had the cup between her legs she'd have not been scalded in an extremely sensitive region of the body. Had the son not put the car in motion whilst the opened coffee cup was whre it was it would not have spilled. In other words, blame was give to everyone *EXCCEPT* the idiots who caused the action in the first place = the customers.

Cheers
Ads
  #92  
Old March 26th 17, 01:16 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,996
Default The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights forBicycles.

On 3/25/2017 2:13 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

I emphasized the word 'old' because I'm pretty certain that the judge gave the payout he did due to her age and to where the injury was located.


Wow, how are you certain of that?

The reality is that she got the payout because McDonald's was negligent
and admitted as much.

"During discovery, McDonalds produced documents showing more than 700
claims by people burned by its coffee between 1982 and 1992. Some claims
involved third-degree burns substantially similar to Liebecks. This
history documented McDonalds' knowledge about the extent and nature of
this hazard."


  #93  
Old March 26th 17, 05:19 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,950
Default The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights for Bicycles.

On Saturday, March 25, 2017 at 8:19:41 PM UTC-4, sms wrote:
On 3/25/2017 2:13 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

I emphasized the word 'old' because I'm pretty certain that the judge gave the payout he did due to her age and to where the injury was located.


Wow, how are you certain of that?

The reality is that she got the payout because McDonald's was negligent
and admitted as much.

"During discovery, McDonalds produced documents showing more than 700
claims by people burned by its coffee between 1982 and 1992. Some claims
involved third-degree burns substantially similar to Liebecks. This
history documented McDonalds' knowledge about the extent and nature of
this hazard."


A deep pockets firm like McDonalds probably as 700 claims from people claiming
their french fries are too sharp. They'll say they stabbed themselves in the
eye with a french fry.

- Frank Krygowski
  #94  
Old March 26th 17, 06:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,554
Default The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights for Bicycles.

On Sat, 25 Mar 2017 11:31:37 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Saturday, March 25, 2017 at 1:16:17 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 20:40:36 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 3/24/2017 8:11 PM, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 11:18:58 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Friday, March 24, 2017 at 1:36:54 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 3/24/2017 11:35 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
... I rarely ride at night, giving
the impression that I don't own a bicycle headlight. Given my
speculation that a majority of the bicycling world follows a similar
operating paradigm, the general impression would be that few riders
own a bicycle headlight.

Many lower-end bikes come with stickers saying "Never Ride at Night."
Surely, such "Danger! Danger!" warnings affect people's behavior.


--
- Frank Krygowski

Or maybe they just forgot to add a line saying "...without using an approved bicycle light or reflectors". Without the warning not to ride at night the bicycle manufacturer and the store are both open to being sued when some idiot without lights or even reflectors rides at night on a dark road and gets hit.

Cheers

Years ago I bought a Greg LeMond frame and built up a road bike. The
frame came with small, arrow shaped decals near the dropouts, saying
"Failure to tighten this bolt may cause loss of the wheel".

Together with the "Never ride at night" decals that Frank mentions and
your warning about being sued, it probably demonstrates the level of
intelligence that others perceive bicyclists to have.

After all, they have to be told repeatedly, over and over again, to
always wear those helmets that will save their lives, to use the
asphalt melting bright lights, that tiny little flashing lights will
make them 32% safer.

Good Lord! Can these people be bright enough to be out alone? Riding
on public roads?

Perhaps if we could limit bicycle riding so that it takes place only
on approved pathways, never at night, and only under the supervision
of a trained supervisor we could stop the carnage on the roads caused
by these two wheeled killers.
--
Cheers,

John B.


I've mentioned this case before here on RBT.

My very good friend's company was sued after an underage
thief was killed crossing an Interstate (pedestrians and
cyclists prohibited) with a freshly stolen bicycle. The open
QR front wheel fell out when he came up out of the ditch
onto a traffic lane. The attorney for the mother of said
miscreant argued that while Schwinns in his store had "do
not ride at night" stickers and also "do not ride without
properly securing wheel quick release" stickers, the brand
in question lacked both. The jury opined that the bicycles
we imported were nonconforming to 'accepted industry standards'.


My personal opinion is that U.S. courts have perpetrated some
extremely illogical rulings on the population.

An individual orders a cup of hot coffee. They are served a cup of hot
coffee. They then accept and pay for the cup of hot coffee and carry
it away. Subsequently they spill the hot coffee on themselves and it
is determined that it was the people who brewed the coffee that were
at fault.

Now you tell the story about the chap that steals a bicycle and it is
the seller who is at fault that he gets run over.

Here we don't have jury trials which means that one has to convince a
trained jurist that you are correct and I do not believe that they
will accept the premise that not tightening the axle nuts on a bicycle
sitting in your shop is the cause of a bicycle thief crashing. Nor
that spilling hot coffee on yourself is someone else's fault :-)

I suppose that ultimately someone will steal a bicycle and when caught
with the stolen goods, tried, convicted and sentenced, will than sue
the manufacturer of the bicycle since logically if "they" hadn't made
the bicycle it couldn't have been stolen....

It is obvious that "reality" in the U.S. is significantly different
than the rest of the world.
--
Cheers,

John B.


The OLD lady bought the coffee, set it between her legs as she sat on rte front passenger seat of the stopped car in the drive-thru lane. Then she removed the lid of the coffee. The driver drove forwards which caused the very hot coffee to spill and scald her in a very sensitive region of her anatomy. IMHO, the fault was due to three people, #1, the woman for putting the hot coffe between her legs and then removing the lid, #2, her son for putting the car into motion whilst his mother had the opened coffee cup between her legs and lastly #3, the store for selling what the courts determined was OVERLY hot coffee.

Cheers


Nope the courts did not rule that the coffee was overly hot. The
Claimant's Attorney argued that but also evidence was presented that
the Coffee Brewing Institute recommended coffee be brewed at a higher
temperature. as it was more tasteful.

(In detail The Claimant argued that coffee at 190 - 190F was
dangerious and the Coffee Brew3ing Institute states that coffee should
be brewed at 197 - 204F)

The Attorney for the Claimant also mentioned several times during the
hearing that the amount that the serving company made, on a world wide
basis, was several times what the Claimant was asking.

But seriously Frank, you buy a cup of coffee, it is served to you and
you accept it and pay for it and carry it away, off the premises of
the seller, and only then do you spill it in your lap and it is the
fault of the company that sold you the coffee?

As an aside, I read that the same stunt was tried in England and the
Court refused to hear the claim. I believe that they stated that it
was, "without merit".
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #95  
Old March 26th 17, 06:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,554
Default The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights for Bicycles.

On Sat, 25 Mar 2017 14:34:35 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 3/25/2017 1:31 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Saturday, March 25, 2017 at 1:16:17 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 20:40:36 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 3/24/2017 8:11 PM, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 11:18:58 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Friday, March 24, 2017 at 1:36:54 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 3/24/2017 11:35 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
... I rarely ride at night, giving
the impression that I don't own a bicycle headlight. Given my
speculation that a majority of the bicycling world follows a similar
operating paradigm, the general impression would be that few riders
own a bicycle headlight.

Many lower-end bikes come with stickers saying "Never Ride at Night."
Surely, such "Danger! Danger!" warnings affect people's behavior.


--
- Frank Krygowski

Or maybe they just forgot to add a line saying "...without using an approved bicycle light or reflectors". Without the warning not to ride at night the bicycle manufacturer and the store are both open to being sued when some idiot without lights or even reflectors rides at night on a dark road and gets hit.

Cheers

Years ago I bought a Greg LeMond frame and built up a road bike. The
frame came with small, arrow shaped decals near the dropouts, saying
"Failure to tighten this bolt may cause loss of the wheel".

Together with the "Never ride at night" decals that Frank mentions and
your warning about being sued, it probably demonstrates the level of
intelligence that others perceive bicyclists to have.

After all, they have to be told repeatedly, over and over again, to
always wear those helmets that will save their lives, to use the
asphalt melting bright lights, that tiny little flashing lights will
make them 32% safer.

Good Lord! Can these people be bright enough to be out alone? Riding
on public roads?

Perhaps if we could limit bicycle riding so that it takes place only
on approved pathways, never at night, and only under the supervision
of a trained supervisor we could stop the carnage on the roads caused
by these two wheeled killers.
--
Cheers,

John B.


I've mentioned this case before here on RBT.

My very good friend's company was sued after an underage
thief was killed crossing an Interstate (pedestrians and
cyclists prohibited) with a freshly stolen bicycle. The open
QR front wheel fell out when he came up out of the ditch
onto a traffic lane. The attorney for the mother of said
miscreant argued that while Schwinns in his store had "do
not ride at night" stickers and also "do not ride without
properly securing wheel quick release" stickers, the brand
in question lacked both. The jury opined that the bicycles
we imported were nonconforming to 'accepted industry standards'.

My personal opinion is that U.S. courts have perpetrated some
extremely illogical rulings on the population.

An individual orders a cup of hot coffee. They are served a cup of hot
coffee. They then accept and pay for the cup of hot coffee and carry
it away. Subsequently they spill the hot coffee on themselves and it
is determined that it was the people who brewed the coffee that were
at fault.

Now you tell the story about the chap that steals a bicycle and it is
the seller who is at fault that he gets run over.

Here we don't have jury trials which means that one has to convince a
trained jurist that you are correct and I do not believe that they
will accept the premise that not tightening the axle nuts on a bicycle
sitting in your shop is the cause of a bicycle thief crashing. Nor
that spilling hot coffee on yourself is someone else's fault :-)

I suppose that ultimately someone will steal a bicycle and when caught
with the stolen goods, tried, convicted and sentenced, will than sue
the manufacturer of the bicycle since logically if "they" hadn't made
the bicycle it couldn't have been stolen....

It is obvious that "reality" in the U.S. is significantly different
than the rest of the world.


The OLD lady bought the coffee, set it between her legs as she sat on the front passenger seat of the stopped car in the drive-thru lane. Then she removed the lid of the coffee. The driver drove forwards which caused the very hot coffee to spill and scald her in a very sensitive region of her anatomy. IMHO, the fault was due to three people, #1, the woman for putting the hot coffe between her legs and then removing the lid, #2, her son for putting the car into motion whilst his mother had the opened coffee cup between her legs and lastly #3, the store for selling what the courts determined was OVERLY hot coffee.



You emphasize the word 'old' and yet most teenagers have
learned that hot coffee is hot. Maybe 'old' is not such a
critical factor here.


Good Lord! Most pre-school children have been taught not to pull the
pot off the stove and scald themselves.

But the adjective "old" does serve to imply that the poor "old" soul
was too feeble to take care of herself.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #96  
Old March 26th 17, 06:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,554
Default The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights for Bicycles.

On Sat, 25 Mar 2017 14:13:31 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Saturday, March 25, 2017 at 3:34:37 PM UTC-4, AMuzi wrote:
On 3/25/2017 1:31 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Saturday, March 25, 2017 at 1:16:17 AM UTC-4, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 20:40:36 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 3/24/2017 8:11 PM, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 24 Mar 2017 11:18:58 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Friday, March 24, 2017 at 1:36:54 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 3/24/2017 11:35 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
... I rarely ride at night, giving
the impression that I don't own a bicycle headlight. Given my
speculation that a majority of the bicycling world follows a similar
operating paradigm, the general impression would be that few riders
own a bicycle headlight.

Many lower-end bikes come with stickers saying "Never Ride at Night."
Surely, such "Danger! Danger!" warnings affect people's behavior.


--
- Frank Krygowski

Or maybe they just forgot to add a line saying "...without using an approved bicycle light or reflectors". Without the warning not to ride at night the bicycle manufacturer and the store are both open to being sued when some idiot without lights or even reflectors rides at night on a dark road and gets hit.

Cheers

Years ago I bought a Greg LeMond frame and built up a road bike. The
frame came with small, arrow shaped decals near the dropouts, saying
"Failure to tighten this bolt may cause loss of the wheel".

Together with the "Never ride at night" decals that Frank mentions and
your warning about being sued, it probably demonstrates the level of
intelligence that others perceive bicyclists to have.

After all, they have to be told repeatedly, over and over again, to
always wear those helmets that will save their lives, to use the
asphalt melting bright lights, that tiny little flashing lights will
make them 32% safer.

Good Lord! Can these people be bright enough to be out alone? Riding
on public roads?

Perhaps if we could limit bicycle riding so that it takes place only
on approved pathways, never at night, and only under the supervision
of a trained supervisor we could stop the carnage on the roads caused
by these two wheeled killers.
--
Cheers,

John B.


I've mentioned this case before here on RBT.

My very good friend's company was sued after an underage
thief was killed crossing an Interstate (pedestrians and
cyclists prohibited) with a freshly stolen bicycle. The open
QR front wheel fell out when he came up out of the ditch
onto a traffic lane. The attorney for the mother of said
miscreant argued that while Schwinns in his store had "do
not ride at night" stickers and also "do not ride without
properly securing wheel quick release" stickers, the brand
in question lacked both. The jury opined that the bicycles
we imported were nonconforming to 'accepted industry standards'.

My personal opinion is that U.S. courts have perpetrated some
extremely illogical rulings on the population.

An individual orders a cup of hot coffee. They are served a cup of hot
coffee. They then accept and pay for the cup of hot coffee and carry
it away. Subsequently they spill the hot coffee on themselves and it
is determined that it was the people who brewed the coffee that were
at fault.

Now you tell the story about the chap that steals a bicycle and it is
the seller who is at fault that he gets run over.

Here we don't have jury trials which means that one has to convince a
trained jurist that you are correct and I do not believe that they
will accept the premise that not tightening the axle nuts on a bicycle
sitting in your shop is the cause of a bicycle thief crashing. Nor
that spilling hot coffee on yourself is someone else's fault :-)

I suppose that ultimately someone will steal a bicycle and when caught
with the stolen goods, tried, convicted and sentenced, will than sue
the manufacturer of the bicycle since logically if "they" hadn't made
the bicycle it couldn't have been stolen....

It is obvious that "reality" in the U.S. is significantly different
than the rest of the world.


The OLD lady bought the coffee, set it between her legs as she sat on the front passenger seat of the stopped car in the drive-thru lane. Then she removed the lid of the coffee. The driver drove forwards which caused the very hot coffee to spill and scald her in a very sensitive region of her anatomy. IMHO, the fault was due to three people, #1, the woman for putting the hot coffe between her legs and then removing the lid, #2, her son for putting the car into motion whilst his mother had the opened coffee cup between her legs and lastly #3, the store for selling what the courts determined was OVERLY hot coffee.



You emphasize the word 'old' and yet most teenagers have
learned that hot coffee is hot. Maybe 'old' is not such a
critical factor here.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I emphasized the word 'old' because I'm pretty certain that the judge gave the payout he did due to her age and to where the injury was located. then again you'd think that her younger son who was the driver at the time would have had more sense than to putt he car into motion whilst an opened cup of coffee was sitting btween his mother's legs. Had the coffee cup lid been on the cup the hot coffee would not have spilled. Had the woman not had the cup between her legs she'd have not been scalded in an extremely sensitive region of the body. Had the son not put the car in motion whilst the opened coffee cup was whre it was it would not have spilled. In other words, blame was give to everyone *EXCCEPT* the idiots who caused the action in the first place = the customers.

Cheers


The judge did not award either injury or punitive amounts. It was a
jury trial and the jury awarded the amounts.

"They awarded Liebeck US$200,000 in compensatory damages, which was
then reduced by 20% to $160,000. In addition, they awarded her $2.7
million in punitive damages.

The jurors apparently arrived at this figure from Morgan's (Claimant's
Attorney) suggestion to penalize McDonald's for one or two days' worth
of coffee revenues, which were about $1.35 million per day. The judge
reduced punitive damages to $480,000, three times the compensatory
amount, for a total of $640,000. The decision was appealed by both
McDonald's and Liebeck in December 1994, but the parties settled out
of court for an undisclosed amount."
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #97  
Old March 26th 17, 07:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,996
Default The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights forBicycles.

On 3/25/2017 9:19 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Saturday, March 25, 2017 at 8:19:41 PM UTC-4, sms wrote:
On 3/25/2017 2:13 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

I emphasized the word 'old' because I'm pretty certain that the judge gave the payout he did due to her age and to where the injury was located.


Wow, how are you certain of that?

The reality is that she got the payout because McDonald's was negligent
and admitted as much.

"During discovery, McDonalds produced documents showing more than 700
claims by people burned by its coffee between 1982 and 1992. Some claims
involved third-degree burns substantially similar to Liebecks. This
history documented McDonalds' knowledge about the extent and nature of
this hazard."


A deep pockets firm like McDonalds probably as 700 claims from people claiming
their french fries are too sharp. They'll say they stabbed themselves in the
eye with a french fry.


Have you done a double-blind study on that with a statistically
significant sample?

  #98  
Old March 26th 17, 07:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,554
Default The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights for Bicycles.

On Sat, 25 Mar 2017 17:16:54 -0700, sms
wrote:

On 3/25/2017 2:13 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

I emphasized the word 'old' because I'm pretty certain that the judge gave the payout he did due to her age and to where the injury was located.


Wow, how are you certain of that?

The reality is that she got the payout because McDonald's was negligent
and admitted as much.

"During discovery, McDonalds produced documents showing more than 700
claims by people burned by its coffee between 1982 and 1992. Some claims
involved third-degree burns substantially similar to Liebecks. This
history documented McDonalds' knowledge about the extent and nature of
this hazard."


That, like many of your posts is a bit misleading. the facts are that
during discover;

"documents obtained from McDonald's showed that from 1982 to 1992 the
company had received more than 700 reports of people burned by
McDonald's coffee to varying degrees of severity, and had settled
claims arising from scalding injuries for more than $500,000."

Note: Over a ten year period McDonald's had received, from their
operations in 65 countries (as of 1992), on the average, 70 reports a
year, or approximately 1.07 per country. and the average settlement
was about $700 per claimant. McDonalds offered Mrs. Liebeck $800 and
her attorney offered to settle for $90,000 which McDonalds refused.

McDonald's quality control manager, Christopher Appleton, testified
that this number of injuries was insufficient to cause the company to
evaluate its practices. He argued that all foods hotter than 130 F
(54 C) constituted a burn hazard, and that restaurants had more
pressing dangers to worry about. The plaintiffs argued that Appleton
conceded that McDonald's coffee would burn the mouth and throat if
consumed when served'

Note: this would seem to explain that the plaintiff was aware that the
coffee was hot enough to burn her.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #99  
Old March 26th 17, 04:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,393
Default The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights forBicycles.

On 3/26/2017 2:12 AM, John B. wrote:

Note: Over a ten year period McDonald's had received, from their
operations in 65 countries (as of 1992), on the average, 70 reports a
year, or approximately 1.07 per country. and the average settlement
was about $700 per claimant. McDonalds offered Mrs. Liebeck $800 and
her attorney offered to settle for $90,000 which McDonalds refused.

McDonald's quality control manager, Christopher Appleton, testified
that this number of injuries was insufficient to cause the company to
evaluate its practices. He argued that all foods hotter than 130 F
(54 C) constituted a burn hazard...


All foods hotter than 130 F. For example, a cup of tea.

Note the recommended temperatures below:

http://www.itoen.com/preparing-tea 175F - 212F

http://theteaspot.com/how-to-brew.html 175F - 212F

http://the.republicoftea.com/library...-brew-hot-tea/
"short of boiling" to "boiling." Then "let it cool a moment. Sip."

Coffee drinkers are such wimps.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #100  
Old March 26th 17, 04:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,393
Default The University of Aalborg Study on Daytime Flashing Lights forBicycles.

On 3/26/2017 1:30 AM, John B. wrote:


But seriously Frank, you buy a cup of coffee...


Whoa! PLEASE don't confuse me with "Sir Ridesalot."

--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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