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Need advice on bottom bracket repair



 
 
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  #21  
Old January 9th 17, 01:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,018
Default Need advice on bottom bracket repair

On Sun, 8 Jan 2017 17:27:33 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

I too have had much better luck with PB Blaster or old-style Liquid
Wrench than with WD-40.


Same here. WD-40 may have 2,000 uses but it's only good at what it
was originally designed to do; displace water.
https://wd40.com/img/WD-40_2000_uses.pdf

I hate suggesting ideas that I haven't tried, but if you're willing to
take the risk (and not sue me), this might actually work.

Better living through chemistry. In this case, we have a steel cup
and an aluminum frame and bottom bracket. My guess(tm) is the threads
are clogged with iron oxide (rust) and aluminum oxide (white crud).
The trick is to find a chemical that will attack both without trashing
the base metals. One thing *NOT* to use is CLR or various household
calcium/lime/rust removers. The acid will attack the two oxides, but
will also destroy the base aluminum threads. It may come apart, but
you probably won't have any threads left in the aluminum.

So, what to do. Oxalic acid and water mix will attack both the rust
and the white crud. It's a rather large molecule, so it may take some
soaking of the bottom bracket in the oxalic acid solution to get some
penetration. If you feel ambitious, heat up the bottom bracket
slightly, slop on the oxalic acid, and get out of the way. Tiny air
spaces in the threads will produce a partial vacuum as it cools, and
suck in the liquid. It won't suck much but it might be enough to
soften whatever is jamming the threads, especially if you can move the
steel cup with the now broken bottom bracket wrench. Oxalic acid will
bleach anything it touches, especially your clothes, so please wear
gloves and protective clothing.

When you put it back together, I suggest a little Never Seize:
http://www.neverseezproducts.com/neverseez.htm
http://www.neverseezproducts.com/antiseize.htm
to prevent a repetition of this exercise. However, if you do use some
kind of anti-seize or grease, be careful not to over tighten the cups.

Good luck.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
Ads
  #22  
Old January 9th 17, 02:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default Need advice on bottom bracket repair

On Sun, 8 Jan 2017 17:27:33 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 1/8/2017 12:08 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/7/2017 8:33 PM, Theodore Heise wrote:
Hi all,

I have an early 1990s Rodriguez tandem with a rear bottom bracket
in serious need of overhaul. The cranks flop severely.

I've pulled the cranks and the lock ring on the left side, but the
adjustable cup won't come out. It turns about a quarter turn, but
then gets too stiff to turn further. It has no flats for a wrench
instead having holes for turning with a pin spanner--so I'm unable
to put a lot of force on it.

I've soaked it with WD40, but still no joy. Any advice for me?


Delco 10.4020 penetrant is the best, PC Blaster is good. Warming with a
heat gun can help.

If no other path, flats can be cut on the cup with a disc grinder to
allow a wrench instead of those brittle expensive pins.

p.s. Try the right side cup too. If that moves, you can easily deal with
the left one after disasssembly.


I too have had much better luck with PB Blaster or old-style Liquid
Wrench than with WD-40.


There is a recipe for "home made penetrating fluid" I found on the web
- equal measures of kerosene, ATF, mineral spirits, and acetone - that
worked really well the time or two I tried it. The problem with it is
I cold never find a bottle to store it in that the acetone didn't
evaporate :-(

I'm not sure what the kerosene and mineral spirits actually add to the
concoction as neither have much lubricity and are both of a higher
viscosity than acetone so I suspect that the 50% ATF and 50% acetone
mix that I've also seen recommended probably works as well.
--
cheers,

John B.

  #23  
Old January 9th 17, 05:41 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,018
Default Need advice on bottom bracket repair

On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 08:34:44 +0700, John B.
wrote:

There is a recipe for "home made penetrating fluid" I found on the web
- equal measures of kerosene, ATF, mineral spirits, and acetone - that
worked really well the time or two I tried it. The problem with it is
I cold never find a bottle to store it in that the acetone didn't
evaporate :-(


I'm surprised that this concoction works. There are quite a few
claims that ATF+acetone works best, but I don't see how. None of the
comments I read talked about using it with aluminum, or an aluminum
and steel combination. If the idea is to attack the oxides, which
requires an acid, none of the mentioned ingredients will do anything
useful, except lubricating the parts of the threads that are already
broken loose.

I'm not sure what the kerosene and mineral spirits actually add to the
concoction as neither have much lubricity and are both of a higher
viscosity than acetone so I suspect that the 50% ATF and 50% acetone
mix that I've also seen recommended probably works as well.


Seems like a popular concoction:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Home-made-penetrating-oil/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CESDxCloCoQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5X0EMlIVx4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0kIPEzeTQ8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WuVBFTzoKc
The last video claims that acetone breaks down rust (at 1:32), which
it doesn't.

What the ATF brings to the table is a detergent, a rust inhibitor,
anti-foaming agent, an anti-oxidant, and some kind of lubricant, none
of which seem useful for breaking loose rust or aluminum oxide.

I wanted to read the original Machinists Workshop Magazine article,
but couldn't find any back issues or copies online. This was the
earliest reference I could find:
http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=20131.0


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #24  
Old January 9th 17, 06:48 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default Need advice on bottom bracket repair

On Sun, 08 Jan 2017 20:41:16 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 08:34:44 +0700, John B.
wrote:

There is a recipe for "home made penetrating fluid" I found on the web
- equal measures of kerosene, ATF, mineral spirits, and acetone - that
worked really well the time or two I tried it. The problem with it is
I cold never find a bottle to store it in that the acetone didn't
evaporate :-(


I'm surprised that this concoction works. There are quite a few
claims that ATF+acetone works best, but I don't see how. None of the
comments I read talked about using it with aluminum, or an aluminum
and steel combination. If the idea is to attack the oxides, which
requires an acid, none of the mentioned ingredients will do anything
useful, except lubricating the parts of the threads that are already
broken loose.

I'm not sure what the kerosene and mineral spirits actually add to the
concoction as neither have much lubricity and are both of a higher
viscosity than acetone so I suspect that the 50% ATF and 50% acetone
mix that I've also seen recommended probably works as well.


Seems like a popular concoction:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Home-made-penetrating-oil/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CESDxCloCoQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5X0EMlIVx4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0kIPEzeTQ8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WuVBFTzoKc
The last video claims that acetone breaks down rust (at 1:32), which
it doesn't.

What the ATF brings to the table is a detergent, a rust inhibitor,
anti-foaming agent, an anti-oxidant, and some kind of lubricant, none
of which seem useful for breaking loose rust or aluminum oxide.


Forget the detergent, the anti-foaming, the anti-oxidant and
concentrate on the lubricant. If you mix acetone with ATF you get a
lubricant that initially has a viscosity of approximately 1/2 - 1/3
that of water (water centipose = 0.89,. acetone = 0.31) so it flows
into some pretty small cracks. Then the acetone evaporates leaving at
least some oil in the joint. And the crux of the argument - it works.

As for aluminum and steel joints. Yes iron and aluminum in the
presence of an electrolyte results in some pretty spectacular
corrosion but even a little insulation prevents that. Grease in the
threads for example. A favored insulation for sail boats where one has
a considerable amount of stainless in contact with aluminum spars is
lanolin for some reason.

I wanted to read the original Machinists Workshop Magazine article,
but couldn't find any back issues or copies online. This was the
earliest reference I could find:
http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=20131.0


Try
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...ng-oil-196347/
which describes the torque loads using different penetrating oils.
From the Machinist Workshop Magazine, April 2007, issue.

Or the magazine at http://www.machinistsworkshop.net/
But they don't seem to allow searching back issues.

--
cheers,

John B.

  #25  
Old January 9th 17, 09:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,018
Default Need advice on bottom bracket repair

On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 12:48:48 +0700, John B.
wrote:

On Sun, 08 Jan 2017 20:41:16 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 08:34:44 +0700, John B.
wrote:

There is a recipe for "home made penetrating fluid" I found on the web
- equal measures of kerosene, ATF, mineral spirits, and acetone - that
worked really well the time or two I tried it. The problem with it is
I cold never find a bottle to store it in that the acetone didn't
evaporate :-(


I'm surprised that this concoction works. There are quite a few
claims that ATF+acetone works best, but I don't see how. None of the
comments I read talked about using it with aluminum, or an aluminum
and steel combination. If the idea is to attack the oxides, which
requires an acid, none of the mentioned ingredients will do anything
useful, except lubricating the parts of the threads that are already
broken loose.

I'm not sure what the kerosene and mineral spirits actually add to the
concoction as neither have much lubricity and are both of a higher
viscosity than acetone so I suspect that the 50% ATF and 50% acetone
mix that I've also seen recommended probably works as well.


Seems like a popular concoction:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Home-made-penetrating-oil/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CESDxCloCoQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5X0EMlIVx4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0kIPEzeTQ8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WuVBFTzoKc
The last video claims that acetone breaks down rust (at 1:32), which
it doesn't.

What the ATF brings to the table is a detergent, a rust inhibitor,
anti-foaming agent, an anti-oxidant, and some kind of lubricant, none
of which seem useful for breaking loose rust or aluminum oxide.


Forget the detergent, the anti-foaming, the anti-oxidant and
concentrate on the lubricant. If you mix acetone with ATF you get a
lubricant that initially has a viscosity of approximately 1/2 - 1/3
that of water (water centipose = 0.89,. acetone = 0.31) so it flows
into some pretty small cracks. Then the acetone evaporates leaving at
least some oil in the joint.


Good point.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viscosity#Viscosity_of_selected_substances
The only other solvent on the list that might work is methanol at
0.54. Looks like acetone might be the best choice as a thinner.

Low viscosity silicon oil (0.65):
http://www.clearcoproducts.com/pure-silicone-super-low-viscosity.html
http://www.clearcoproducts.com/pdf/volatile/NP-PSF-0_65cSt.pdf
Might work instead of the ATF+acetone mix, but also might be
expensive.

And the crux of the argument - it works.


I want to know why it works at least twice as good as the others on
the list.

As for aluminum and steel joints. Yes iron and aluminum in the
presence of an electrolyte results in some pretty spectacular
corrosion but even a little insulation prevents that. Grease in the
threads for example.


On the bottom bracket in question, corrosion has already set in and
it's too late for preventive measures.

A favored insulation for sail boats where one has
a considerable amount of stainless in contact with aluminum spars is
lanolin for some reason.


PTFE tape is my favorite. Close to lanolin is white lithium grease,
which is essentially a soap.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_soap

I wanted to read the original Machinists Workshop Magazine article,
but couldn't find any back issues or copies online. This was the
earliest reference I could find:
http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=20131.0


Try
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...ng-oil-196347/
which describes the torque loads using different penetrating oils.
From the Machinist Workshop Magazine, April 2007, issue.


Thanks, but that is roughly the same as what I found in numerous other
references to the article. I was looking for a copy of the original
article.

Or the magazine at http://www.machinistsworkshop.net/
But they don't seem to allow searching back issues.


Yep, that's the problem. Usually, when there's something mentioned
that often, someone scans the original article and posts it. Not this
time.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #26  
Old January 9th 17, 12:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,202
Default Need advice on bottom bracket repair

On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 00:12:49 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 12:48:48 +0700, John B.
wrote:

On Sun, 08 Jan 2017 20:41:16 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 08:34:44 +0700, John B.
wrote:

There is a recipe for "home made penetrating fluid" I found on the web
- equal measures of kerosene, ATF, mineral spirits, and acetone - that
worked really well the time or two I tried it. The problem with it is
I cold never find a bottle to store it in that the acetone didn't
evaporate :-(

I'm surprised that this concoction works. There are quite a few
claims that ATF+acetone works best, but I don't see how. None of the
comments I read talked about using it with aluminum, or an aluminum
and steel combination. If the idea is to attack the oxides, which
requires an acid, none of the mentioned ingredients will do anything
useful, except lubricating the parts of the threads that are already
broken loose.

I'm not sure what the kerosene and mineral spirits actually add to the
concoction as neither have much lubricity and are both of a higher
viscosity than acetone so I suspect that the 50% ATF and 50% acetone
mix that I've also seen recommended probably works as well.

Seems like a popular concoction:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Home-made-penetrating-oil/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CESDxCloCoQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5X0EMlIVx4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0kIPEzeTQ8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WuVBFTzoKc
The last video claims that acetone breaks down rust (at 1:32), which
it doesn't.

What the ATF brings to the table is a detergent, a rust inhibitor,
anti-foaming agent, an anti-oxidant, and some kind of lubricant, none
of which seem useful for breaking loose rust or aluminum oxide.


Forget the detergent, the anti-foaming, the anti-oxidant and
concentrate on the lubricant. If you mix acetone with ATF you get a
lubricant that initially has a viscosity of approximately 1/2 - 1/3
that of water (water centipose = 0.89,. acetone = 0.31) so it flows
into some pretty small cracks. Then the acetone evaporates leaving at
least some oil in the joint.


Good point.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viscosity#Viscosity_of_selected_substances
The only other solvent on the list that might work is methanol at
0.54. Looks like acetone might be the best choice as a thinner.

Low viscosity silicon oil (0.65):
http://www.clearcoproducts.com/pure-silicone-super-low-viscosity.html
http://www.clearcoproducts.com/pdf/volatile/NP-PSF-0_65cSt.pdf
Might work instead of the ATF+acetone mix, but also might be
expensive.

And the crux of the argument - it works.


I want to know why it works at least twice as good as the others on
the list.


Well, the standard answer is "'cause it is good stuff" :-)

As for aluminum and steel joints. Yes iron and aluminum in the
presence of an electrolyte results in some pretty spectacular
corrosion but even a little insulation prevents that. Grease in the
threads for example.


On the bottom bracket in question, corrosion has already set in and
it's too late for preventive measures.

A favored insulation for sail boats where one has
a considerable amount of stainless in contact with aluminum spars is
lanolin for some reason.


PTFE tape is my favorite. Close to lanolin is white lithium grease,
which is essentially a soap.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_soap


Just about anything seems to work. I've used lanolin, grease, some
special stuff - looked like white grease but cost more, and even
caulking compound. It all seemed to work :-)

I wanted to read the original Machinists Workshop Magazine article,
but couldn't find any back issues or copies online. This was the
earliest reference I could find:
http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=20131.0


Try
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...ng-oil-196347/
which describes the torque loads using different penetrating oils.
From the Machinist Workshop Magazine, April 2007, issue.


Thanks, but that is roughly the same as what I found in numerous other
references to the article. I was looking for a copy of the original
article.

Or the magazine at http://www.machinistsworkshop.net/
But they don't seem to allow searching back issues.


Yep, that's the problem. Usually, when there's something mentioned
that often, someone scans the original article and posts it. Not this
time.

--
cheers,

John B.

  #27  
Old January 9th 17, 03:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,447
Default Need advice on bottom bracket repair

On 1/9/2017 2:12 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 12:48:48 +0700, John B.
wrote:

On Sun, 08 Jan 2017 20:41:16 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 08:34:44 +0700, John B.
wrote:

There is a recipe for "home made penetrating fluid" I found on the web
- equal measures of kerosene, ATF, mineral spirits, and acetone - that
worked really well the time or two I tried it. The problem with it is
I cold never find a bottle to store it in that the acetone didn't
evaporate :-(

I'm surprised that this concoction works. There are quite a few
claims that ATF+acetone works best, but I don't see how. None of the
comments I read talked about using it with aluminum, or an aluminum
and steel combination. If the idea is to attack the oxides, which
requires an acid, none of the mentioned ingredients will do anything
useful, except lubricating the parts of the threads that are already
broken loose.

I'm not sure what the kerosene and mineral spirits actually add to the
concoction as neither have much lubricity and are both of a higher
viscosity than acetone so I suspect that the 50% ATF and 50% acetone
mix that I've also seen recommended probably works as well.

Seems like a popular concoction:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Home-made-penetrating-oil/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CESDxCloCoQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5X0EMlIVx4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0kIPEzeTQ8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WuVBFTzoKc
The last video claims that acetone breaks down rust (at 1:32), which
it doesn't.

What the ATF brings to the table is a detergent, a rust inhibitor,
anti-foaming agent, an anti-oxidant, and some kind of lubricant, none
of which seem useful for breaking loose rust or aluminum oxide.


Forget the detergent, the anti-foaming, the anti-oxidant and
concentrate on the lubricant. If you mix acetone with ATF you get a
lubricant that initially has a viscosity of approximately 1/2 - 1/3
that of water (water centipose = 0.89,. acetone = 0.31) so it flows
into some pretty small cracks. Then the acetone evaporates leaving at
least some oil in the joint.


Good point.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viscosity#Viscosity_of_selected_substances
The only other solvent on the list that might work is methanol at
0.54. Looks like acetone might be the best choice as a thinner.

Low viscosity silicon oil (0.65):
http://www.clearcoproducts.com/pure-silicone-super-low-viscosity.html
http://www.clearcoproducts.com/pdf/volatile/NP-PSF-0_65cSt.pdf
Might work instead of the ATF+acetone mix, but also might be
expensive.

And the crux of the argument - it works.


I want to know why it works at least twice as good as the others on
the list.

As for aluminum and steel joints. Yes iron and aluminum in the
presence of an electrolyte results in some pretty spectacular
corrosion but even a little insulation prevents that. Grease in the
threads for example.


On the bottom bracket in question, corrosion has already set in and
it's too late for preventive measures.

A favored insulation for sail boats where one has
a considerable amount of stainless in contact with aluminum spars is
lanolin for some reason.


PTFE tape is my favorite. Close to lanolin is white lithium grease,
which is essentially a soap.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_soap

I wanted to read the original Machinists Workshop Magazine article,
but couldn't find any back issues or copies online. This was the
earliest reference I could find:
http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=20131.0


Try
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...ng-oil-196347/
which describes the torque loads using different penetrating oils.
From the Machinist Workshop Magazine, April 2007, issue.


Thanks, but that is roughly the same as what I found in numerous other
references to the article. I was looking for a copy of the original
article.

Or the magazine at http://www.machinistsworkshop.net/
But they don't seem to allow searching back issues.


Yep, that's the problem. Usually, when there's something mentioned
that often, someone scans the original article and posts it. Not this
time.



Nothing wrong with white lithium grease, lanolin, teflon
tape or Gene's favorite linseed oil.

Where steel threads to aluminum, assuming moisture or just
humidity, a molybdenum-rich paste is the go-to prep. Note
molybdenum paste is not much of a lubricant but it is a
great anticorrosive barrier.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #28  
Old January 9th 17, 04:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default Need advice on bottom bracket repair

On Monday, January 9, 2017 at 6:30:37 AM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/9/2017 2:12 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 12:48:48 +0700, John B.
wrote:

On Sun, 08 Jan 2017 20:41:16 -0800, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 09 Jan 2017 08:34:44 +0700, John B.
wrote:

There is a recipe for "home made penetrating fluid" I found on the web
- equal measures of kerosene, ATF, mineral spirits, and acetone - that
worked really well the time or two I tried it. The problem with it is
I cold never find a bottle to store it in that the acetone didn't
evaporate :-(

I'm surprised that this concoction works. There are quite a few
claims that ATF+acetone works best, but I don't see how. None of the
comments I read talked about using it with aluminum, or an aluminum
and steel combination. If the idea is to attack the oxides, which
requires an acid, none of the mentioned ingredients will do anything
useful, except lubricating the parts of the threads that are already
broken loose.

I'm not sure what the kerosene and mineral spirits actually add to the
concoction as neither have much lubricity and are both of a higher
viscosity than acetone so I suspect that the 50% ATF and 50% acetone
mix that I've also seen recommended probably works as well.

Seems like a popular concoction:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Home-made-penetrating-oil/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CESDxCloCoQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5X0EMlIVx4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0kIPEzeTQ8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WuVBFTzoKc
The last video claims that acetone breaks down rust (at 1:32), which
it doesn't.

What the ATF brings to the table is a detergent, a rust inhibitor,
anti-foaming agent, an anti-oxidant, and some kind of lubricant, none
of which seem useful for breaking loose rust or aluminum oxide.


Forget the detergent, the anti-foaming, the anti-oxidant and
concentrate on the lubricant. If you mix acetone with ATF you get a
lubricant that initially has a viscosity of approximately 1/2 - 1/3
that of water (water centipose = 0.89,. acetone = 0.31) so it flows
into some pretty small cracks. Then the acetone evaporates leaving at
least some oil in the joint.


Good point.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viscosity#Viscosity_of_selected_substances
The only other solvent on the list that might work is methanol at
0.54. Looks like acetone might be the best choice as a thinner.

Low viscosity silicon oil (0.65):
http://www.clearcoproducts.com/pure-silicone-super-low-viscosity.html
http://www.clearcoproducts.com/pdf/volatile/NP-PSF-0_65cSt.pdf
Might work instead of the ATF+acetone mix, but also might be
expensive.

And the crux of the argument - it works.


I want to know why it works at least twice as good as the others on
the list.

As for aluminum and steel joints. Yes iron and aluminum in the
presence of an electrolyte results in some pretty spectacular
corrosion but even a little insulation prevents that. Grease in the
threads for example.


On the bottom bracket in question, corrosion has already set in and
it's too late for preventive measures.

A favored insulation for sail boats where one has
a considerable amount of stainless in contact with aluminum spars is
lanolin for some reason.


PTFE tape is my favorite. Close to lanolin is white lithium grease,
which is essentially a soap.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_soap

I wanted to read the original Machinists Workshop Magazine article,
but couldn't find any back issues or copies online. This was the
earliest reference I could find:
http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=20131.0


Try
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...ng-oil-196347/
which describes the torque loads using different penetrating oils.
From the Machinist Workshop Magazine, April 2007, issue.


Thanks, but that is roughly the same as what I found in numerous other
references to the article. I was looking for a copy of the original
article.

Or the magazine at http://www.machinistsworkshop.net/
But they don't seem to allow searching back issues.


Yep, that's the problem. Usually, when there's something mentioned
that often, someone scans the original article and posts it. Not this
time.



Nothing wrong with white lithium grease, lanolin, teflon
tape or Gene's favorite linseed oil.

Where steel threads to aluminum, assuming moisture or just
humidity, a molybdenum-rich paste is the go-to prep. Note
molybdenum paste is not much of a lubricant but it is a
great anticorrosive barrier.


Since I wasn't familiar with this I looked it up and it sure looks like the way to go. I think that if you want a light bike that aluminum is the way to go since in the stress tests and fatigue tests they weren't able to make the good quality frames/forks fail.

Although more and more components are being made of carbon I sure as hell would steer away from them. It appears that the two most common failures are handlebars and seatposts. Aluminum cranks fail too but the pictures I've had of these failures show really abused cranks. Often pitted from being left out in the weather. Whereas the failures of FSA and Campy carbon cranks seem to occur rather rapidly and from manufacturing errors (a bubble in the layup). Since carbon cranks are so heavily built perhaps if you get past the initial period they may be more reliable than aluminum.

This molybdenum paste is often called either a "lubricant" or "loctite" instead of an antiseize as you correctly mention.
  #29  
Old January 9th 17, 05:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH
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Posts: 2,011
Default Need advice on bottom bracket repair

divinity deleted willya get a propane torch or heat gun .....

we went thru this a few months back.

the white ionic exchange compound does not dissolve in organic solvents caws the white isnot organic ! eyeyhahhhahahhah ....

I dunno what yawl doing dumping acetone into petroleum products ....cretins.

acetone is here to emulsify petroleum products.

Lieb...what's the home brew biggie ? chlorine and ?

you pour it into the john n the bowl explodes .....

  #30  
Old January 9th 17, 05:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH
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Posts: 2,011
Default Need advice on bottom bracket repair

1 April, 1971

AFAIK, locktite on clean threads with a seal on outside surface with linseed applied with a small amount thinner if below 65 degrees..with an artists brush ....doahn pour it on or use a spray bottle. The brushes are at Wal handicrafts.

the number of ? pouring organic solvents on white ionic debris must number in the thousands .....wd-40...wuhwuhwuh

see

https://www.google.com/#q=motorcycle+loading+fails
 




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