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Respacing a rear wheel



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 16th 04, 11:22 PM
trent gregory hill
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Default Respacing a rear wheel

Folks,

I have a question about converting a 130mm Ultegra hub for use on a bike
that's spaced to 135 mm. I know you can do it by adding a 5mm spacer and
redishing the wheel, but once that's done, how does the wheel compare to a
wheel originally built on a 135 mm hub in terms of strength?

Thanks,

Trent
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  #2  
Old September 16th 04, 11:41 PM
Bruce Lange
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" I have a question about converting a 130mm Ultegra hub for use on a bike
that's spaced to 135 mm. I know you can do it by adding a 5mm spacer and
redishing the wheel, but once that's done, how does the wheel compare to a
wheel originally built on a 135 mm hub in terms of strength?


If you add the 5mm spacer to the left side of the hub, the wheel will be
stronger because the dish will be reduced and the spokes more evenly
tensioned between the left and right sides of the wheel.

-Bruce-



  #3  
Old September 17th 04, 01:26 AM
Phil, Squid-in-Training
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Bruce Lange wrote:
" I have a question about converting a 130mm Ultegra hub for use on
a bike
that's spaced to 135 mm. I know you can do it by adding a 5mm
spacer and redishing the wheel, but once that's done, how does the
wheel compare to a wheel originally built on a 135 mm hub in terms
of strength?


If you add the 5mm spacer to the left side of the hub, the wheel will
be stronger because the dish will be reduced and the spokes more
evenly tensioned between the left and right sides of the wheel.


This begs the question:

Why not make all hubs such that the dish is zero, right off the bat? Or why
aren't all mountain hubs have the flange spacing of road hubs, so as to make
it stronger?

--
Phil, Squid-in-Training



  #4  
Old September 17th 04, 01:41 AM
David L. Johnson
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On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 00:26:32 +0000, Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:

If you add the 5mm spacer to the left side of the hub, the wheel will be
stronger because the dish will be reduced and the spokes more evenly
tensioned between the left and right sides of the wheel.


Stronger, that is, than that 130mm wheel was originally.

This begs the question:

Why not make all hubs such that the dish is zero, right off the bat? Or
why aren't all mountain hubs have the flange spacing of road hubs, so as
to make it stronger?


narrowing the flange spacing does not make a wheel stronger. But keep in
mind that "stronger" is not really the only consideration. Strong enough,
yes, but most of us do quite fine with 130mm spacing on 8-9-10 speed hubs.
A 135mm hub will probably be stronger than a 130 stretched and re-spaced
like this. But the 130 will be strong enough -- that is, if there is an
axle for it that is long enough.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not
_`\(,_ | certain, and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to
(_)/ (_) | reality. -- Albert Einstein


  #5  
Old September 17th 04, 04:17 AM
Sheldon Brown
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Default

Bruce Lange either asked or answered this question, attribution is hazy:

" I have a question about converting a 130mm Ultegra hub for use on
a bike

that's spaced to 135 mm. I know you can do it by adding a 5mm
spacer and redishing the wheel, but once that's done, how does the
wheel compare to a wheel originally built on a 135 mm hub in terms
of strength?


If you add the 5mm spacer to the left side of the hub, the wheel will
be stronger because the dish will be reduced and the spokes more
evenly tensioned between the left and right sides of the wheel.


Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:

This begs the question:

Why not make all hubs such that the dish is zero, right off the bat?


Because if the flanges are too close together it makes the wheel weak
laterally.

Or why
aren't all mountain hubs have the flange spacing of road hubs, so as to make
it stronger?


They generally do have the same flange spacing, which is part of the
reason mountain-bike wheels are generally stronger than road-bike wheels.

Sheldon "It's All About Triangles" Brown
+---------------------------------------------------+
| Time shouldn't just pass; things should happen. |
| --Harry Turtledove |
+---------------------------------------------------+
Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
http://harriscyclery.com
Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com

  #6  
Old September 17th 04, 06:06 AM
A Muzi
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trent gregory hill wrote:
I have a question about converting a 130mm Ultegra hub for use on a bike
that's spaced to 135 mm. I know you can do it by adding a 5mm spacer
and redishing the wheel, but once that's done, how does the wheel
compare to a wheel originally built on a 135 mm hub in terms of strength?


When you add a spacer it will be a 135mm hub.
Not a copy. Not a replica. It will truly be a real 135mm
hub in every way.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

  #7  
Old September 17th 04, 07:21 AM
A Muzi
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" I have a question about converting a 130mm Ultegra hub for use on
a bike
that's spaced to 135 mm. I know you can do it by adding a 5mm
spacer and redishing the wheel, but once that's done, how does the
wheel compare to a wheel originally built on a 135 mm hub in terms
of strength?


Bruce Lange wrote:
If you add the 5mm spacer to the left side of the hub, the wheel will
be stronger because the dish will be reduced and the spokes more
evenly tensioned between the left and right sides of the wheel.


Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
This begs the question:
Why not make all hubs such that the dish is zero, right off the bat? Or why
aren't all mountain hubs have the flange spacing of road hubs, so as to make
it stronger?


You need to look at a hub more closely. With a caliper.

Neither dish isn't zero, road hubs aren't stronger. Heck,
MTB and road hubs are often the same shell with a difference
only of left side spacing.
--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

  #8  
Old September 17th 04, 02:11 PM
Qui si parla Campagnolo
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tghill- I have a question about converting a 130mm Ultegra hub for use on a
bike
that's spaced to 135 mm. I know you can do it by adding a 5mm spacer and
redishing the wheel, but once that's done, how does the wheel compare to a
wheel originally built on a 135 mm hub in terms of strength? BRBR

If you add the spacer to the left, and add tension to the left spokes to get
dish right, probably the same, in terms of strength.

Peter Chisholm
Vecchio's Bicicletteria
1833 Pearl St.
Boulder, CO, 80302
(303)440-3535
http://www.vecchios.com
"Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
  #9  
Old September 17th 04, 02:54 PM
Sheldon Brown
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Default

trent gregory hill wrote:

I have a question about converting a 130mm Ultegra hub for use on a
bike that's spaced to 135 mm. I know you can do it by adding a 5mm
spacer and redishing the wheel, but once that's done, how does the
wheel compare to a wheel originally built on a 135 mm hub in terms of
strength?


A. M. Uzi shot back:

When you add a spacer it will be a 135mm hub.
Not a copy. Not a replica. It will truly be a real 135mm hub in every way.

Clearly, Andy doesn't believe in homeopathy...

Carapace Completed Umber
Salem, Massaachusetts Bay Colony

  #10  
Old September 18th 04, 02:52 PM
Qui si parla Campagnolo
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Default

Sheldon- A. M. Uzi shot back: BRBR


Funny...thanks for a little levity on this NG that is getting rather testy,
with me participating...OT-Bush and his crashes, etc'.

Peter Chisholm
Vecchio's Bicicletteria
1833 Pearl St.
Boulder, CO, 80302
(303)440-3535
http://www.vecchios.com
"Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
 




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