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LED headlight problem solved



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 1st 06, 01:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
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Default LED headlight problem solved

Adding a head-mounted LED

http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/sto...atalog_ id=BV

(you will have to cut and paste the split line, or go to www.llbean.com , search BV49775 ) $35

to a see-me light on the handlebars solves the weak illumination problem

This one happens to fit underneath my old Bell helmet okay, if I wear the helmet a little
high in the front.

Being able to put the light where you want from instant to instant overcomes the missing
illumination feeling that LEDs give you, even running on low (it says 40h on its 3 AAA's).

I'm able to run with one LED on the handlebars for a see-me and work the headlamp
for complete comfort.

Aside from that, it's the world's greatest invention, putting light wherever you walk
when the power goes out in the house.

The LLBean version has a continuously adjustable angle.

Campmor has the same light with a click-stop thingy

http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/st...rtNumber=55943

same price. I can't say which is better, but it's a nice technology. Campmor
tends to have things in stock where LLBean is always backordered.
--
Ron Hardin


On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
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  #2  
Old April 1st 06, 02:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
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Default LED headlight problem solved

Ron Hardin wrote:
Adding a head-mounted LED

http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/sto...atalog_ id=BV

(you will have to cut and paste the split line, or go to www.llbean.com , search BV49775 ) $35

to a see-me light on the handlebars solves the weak illumination problem

This one happens to fit underneath my old Bell helmet okay, if I wear the helmet a little
high in the front.

Being able to put the light where you want from instant to instant overcomes the missing
illumination feeling that LEDs give you, even running on low (it says 40h on its 3 AAA's).

I'm able to run with one LED on the handlebars for a see-me and work the headlamp
for complete comfort.

Aside from that, it's the world's greatest invention, putting light wherever you walk
when the power goes out in the house.

The LLBean version has a continuously adjustable angle.

Campmor has the same light with a click-stop thingy

http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/st...rtNumber=55943

same price. I can't say which is better, but it's a nice technology. Campmor
tends to have things in stock where LLBean is always backordered.


The only problem that may exist is a legal issue. Here in Florida (may
part anyway) it's illegal to have a light on your head. I don't
understand it. But someone I know has been stopped and ticketed for
using such a light.

Ken
--
A bicycle does get you there and more.... And there is always the thin
edge of danger to keep you alert and comfortably apprehensive. Dogs
become dogs again and snap at your raincoat; potholes become personal.
And getting there is all the fun. ~Bill Emerson, "On Bicycling,"
Saturday Evening Post, 29 July 1967

Homepage: http://www.bikesandmoreonline.com/
  #3  
Old April 1st 06, 05:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
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Default LED headlight problem solved

On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 08:09:26 -0500, "Ken C. M."
wrote:

The only problem that may exist is a legal issue. Here in Florida (may
part anyway) it's illegal to have a light on your head. I don't
understand it. But someone I know has been stopped and ticketed for
using such a light.

During a power outage,my wife was wearing one of those. Every time I
spoke or moved, she would instinctively track me, and blind me.
Now imagine driving, walking, or cycling at night when the rider is
wearing one of those.
Instinctive scanning movements cause the light to aim all about, and
centering often on an object of interest...a pedestrian, oncoming
cyclist, cager, etc. At the very least it is annoying, and worse, can
disrupt someone's night vision temporarily. The concept is great, but
I see no solution for preventing the effect, after several hours with
someone wearing on.

  #4  
Old April 1st 06, 10:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
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Default LED headlight problem solved


"Grunty Grogan" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 08:09:26 -0500, "Ken C. M."
wrote:

The only problem that may exist is a legal issue. Here in Florida (may
part anyway) it's illegal to have a light on your head. I don't
understand it. But someone I know has been stopped and ticketed for
using such a light.

During a power outage,my wife was wearing one of those. Every time I
spoke or moved, she would instinctively track me, and blind me.
Now imagine driving, walking, or cycling at night when the rider is
wearing one of those.
Instinctive scanning movements cause the light to aim all about, and
centering often on an object of interest...a pedestrian, oncoming
cyclist, cager, etc. At the very least it is annoying, and worse, can
disrupt someone's night vision temporarily. The concept is great, but
I see no solution for preventing the effect, after several hours with
someone wearing on.

The negative aspect you mentioned is exactly why they're perfect for
nighttime road cyclists. When you look right at the guy behind the wheel, he
knows you're there.


  #5  
Old April 1st 06, 11:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
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Default LED headlight problem solved

Gooserider wrote:

The negative aspect you mentioned is exactly why they're perfect for
nighttime road cyclists. When you look right at the guy behind the wheel, he
knows you're there.


It's also the reason they're crap for night-time cyclists. I've lost
count of the number of times I've been blinded in the winter by some
inconsiderate ****** staring directly at my face with one of those.
They're not usually using a little LED either, it's usually a 10 or 15
watt halogen one.

--
Dane Buson -
"Your food stamps will be stopped effective March 1992 because we received
notice that you passed away. May God bless you. You may reapply if there is a
change in your circumstances." -Department of Social Services, Greenville, SC
  #6  
Old April 2nd 06, 12:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
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Default LED headlight problem solved

On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 21:00:24 GMT, "Gooserider"
wrote:

The negative aspect you mentioned is exactly why they're perfect for
nighttime road cyclists. When you look right at the guy behind the wheel, he
knows you're there.

Oh, NO argument there. By the actions in my town of Moo-U-V drivers,
it would only make me a better target. I gave up pavement, and just
stick to trails. This is too bad, because I lose the store and Post
Office runs on the bike, and smooth pavement is a luxury now. But I
live in a suburb with very narrow country roads, sometimes with steep
banking and no place to escape..not even the escape hatch of a
sidewalk or shoulder, in some places. I fear it is better in my case
to not provide such a tempting target. If you lightstruck one of
them, well, they are already in a feral condition to begin with, and
NOTHING is as important as getting their kids to soccer.
Especially anything as trivial as my life.
(Pardon the mood today, but I did have a narrow escape with one only
an hour ago. The side mirror DID miss my elbow, so no real harm done.
It was a glorious Spring day, and possibly the cagers are entering the
Breeding Phase.)

  #7  
Old April 2nd 06, 12:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
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Default LED headlight problem solved


"Gooserider" wrote in message
m...

"Grunty Grogan" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 08:09:26 -0500, "Ken C. M."
wrote:

The only problem that may exist is a legal issue. Here in Florida (may
part anyway) it's illegal to have a light on your head. I don't
understand it. But someone I know has been stopped and ticketed for
using such a light.

During a power outage,my wife was wearing one of those. Every time I
spoke or moved, she would instinctively track me, and blind me.
Now imagine driving, walking, or cycling at night when the rider is
wearing one of those.
Instinctive scanning movements cause the light to aim all about, and
centering often on an object of interest...a pedestrian, oncoming
cyclist, cager, etc. At the very least it is annoying, and worse, can
disrupt someone's night vision temporarily. The concept is great, but
I see no solution for preventing the effect, after several hours with
someone wearing on.


The negative aspect you mentioned is exactly why they're perfect for
nighttime road cyclists. When you look right at the guy behind the wheel,
he knows you're there.

It's the reason I don't use a head-mounted light. The essence of safe
vehicular cycling is predictability, for the cyclist to fit into the
expected flow and behavior of traffic. This includes fixed headlights that
point in the direction of travel. The potential to confuse and disorient a
driver by pointing a bright light at his face is, in my opinion, a greater
threat to safety than any gain from the lights (vs an effective set of fixed
head- and tail-lights).

RichC


  #8  
Old April 3rd 06, 10:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
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Posts: n/a
Default LED headlight problem solved

Grunty Grogan wrote:
During a power outage,my wife was wearing one of those. Every time I
spoke or moved, she would instinctively track me, and blind me.
Now imagine driving, walking, or cycling at night when the rider is
wearing one of those.


Well of course you don't let women use them.

What you need for safe low-light riding is the ability to overcome
high beams from oncoming traffic by watching the right edge of the
road with your head beacon, far from blinding the other guy with it.

In may case, it's a deer detector as well, picking up deer eyes off
the dark road edge where the fixed beams don't catch them.

You can see very well where the beam is going, and it's easy to
manage.
--
Ron Hardin


On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
  #9  
Old April 3rd 06, 10:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
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Posts: n/a
Default LED headlight problem solved


"Grunty Grogan" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 21:00:24 GMT, "Gooserider"
wrote:

The negative aspect you mentioned is exactly why they're perfect for
nighttime road cyclists. When you look right at the guy behind the wheel,
he
knows you're there.

Oh, NO argument there. By the actions in my town of Moo-U-V drivers,
it would only make me a better target. I gave up pavement, and just
stick to trails. This is too bad, because I lose the store and Post
Office runs on the bike, and smooth pavement is a luxury now. But I
live in a suburb with very narrow country roads, sometimes with steep
banking and no place to escape..not even the escape hatch of a
sidewalk or shoulder, in some places. I fear it is better in my case
to not provide such a tempting target. If you lightstruck one of
them, well, they are already in a feral condition to begin with, and
NOTHING is as important as getting their kids to soccer.
Especially anything as trivial as my life.
(Pardon the mood today, but I did have a narrow escape with one only
an hour ago. The side mirror DID miss my elbow, so no real harm done.
It was a glorious Spring day, and possibly the cagers are entering the
Breeding Phase.)


Oh I've found having a light on my lid has been instrumental in getting
motorists to notice I'm there much sooner than when I didn't have a light on
my lid. Oncoming drivers dip their headlights *much* sooner, thus indicating
they've seen me much sooner than previously - in my book this is increasing
my safety on the roads. Indeed I've found another advantage to a lid-mounted
light - if the oncoming traffic doesn't dip headlights, a swift direct look
from me to where the driver of the offending vehicle is located soon makes
them realise I'm there - again, increasing my safety. I don't always look
directly where an oncoming driver is, but having the facility to do so has
made my night-time cycling far safer IMO. It's not necessary to *stare* for
a *long time* at an oncoming driver and dazzle him/her, but a swift look
certainly gets their attention - which is a good thing. Indeed I've had
motorists comment on how visible I am when cycling at night and how they
view this as a good thing and have even said they wish other cyclists were
as visible as I am.

Cheers, helen s



 




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