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  #21  
Old March 12th 21, 02:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 143
Default Eddy Merckx Elite

On Friday, March 12, 2021 at 9:33:16 AM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, March 12, 2021 at 6:17:46 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Wednesday, March 10, 2021 at 11:36:45 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Wednesday, March 10, 2021 at 7:03:14 PM UTC-6, John B. wrote:
Claims a $40,000 income one month and buys second hand junk

John B.

Is that $40k per YEAR, or per MONTH? If its per month, then even in expensive California that should be enough to get you into the middle class and allow you to live somewhat comfortably if you watch some of your pennies. I'm sure $480,000 per year does not go too far in California, but it should be OK enough. Now, if its $40,000 per year, then one would have to watch what junk they buy second hand. But even with a mere $40,000 per year, even in expensive California you should be able to feed yourself and keep some kind of roof over your head and buy a used K-Mart bike every year or two.

That is taxable income per year though I'm now not far from making that per month. But making money and spending money when Biden is in power wouldn't be very smart now would it. Where it is is inflation safe. Biden has sent us down the road to super inflation and according to Frank, that's no problem at all because he doesn't give one **** about the rest of the world and all of the people in it as long as he can get along. The normal communist schpeal.

If the Biden economy is so bad, how are you close to making $480K per year? Doing what? You stated your retirement account was sub $1M, and it is not going to be generating 50% returns in any Biden market. That's impossible because he's a communist, and the market hates him.

yup, the markets hate biden so much that since biden was sworn in the DJIA is up over 6% and the SP500 is up over 4 %, both tracking to record highs. Here's some financial advice - Watch what kunich does, then do the opposite..
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  #22  
Old March 12th 21, 04:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 10,170
Default Eddy Merckx Elite

On 3/12/2021 4:52 AM, Lou Holtman wrote:

Op vrijdag 12 maart 2021 om 04:17:40 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:

On 3/11/2021 12:43 PM, Lou Holtman wrote:

Op donderdag 11 maart 2021 om 17:09:32 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/10/2021 9:43 PM, John B. wrote:

Well there is the debate about the gravel and CX bikes but here,
essentially, all the roads, or at least all the roads I see, are
paved. I've been riding 23mm tires since I switched from "sew-ups".
I think the narrowest tires ever used for more than a short time were
25mm. I've spent most of my road riding time on 28s, some on 32s, a bit
on 35s or 37s when doing loaded touring.

It seems the latest data indicates the super narrow tires have no lower
rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider tires, unless you're
on a surface as smooth as a velodrome track. And wider tires tend to be
less flat prone and more comfortable.

That is a too simple conclusion. I mentioned this earlier:

https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison

Well, there are always more details one can consider. Care to summarize
which further details you think need mention?



If someone states that tires of the same construction (ie. Continental GP5000) the wider version will have less RR and are more comfortable he/she is mistaken. This is easy to understand. Inflate the wider version to the same pressure and it will have less RR but also is less comfortable for the same reason: less vertical deflection when hitting a bump. As for the less prone to puncture statement this is only true for the pinch flat part. I always opposed to the less RR and more comfortable ride statements of people who never used tires of the same construction for both widths. I use Continental GP5000 tires in 25, 28 and 32 mm width and my observation is exactly on par with the results of the test I referred to. Besides the higher weight and being less aero you can achieve a lower RR with wider tires but they will be more uncomfortable. You can use wider tires at a lower pressure for traction and/or comfort on rough surface without an increased chance of a pinch flat but the RR will be more. To speak in your terms wider tires are more versatile but nothing comes for free.


OK, let's dive into the rabbit hole:

Perhaps I should not have said "... data indicates the super narrow
tires have no lower rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider
tires ..." without adding "... if pressures are within about 25 psi."

Because, according to the second graph at
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
if a person who switched from 23s to 32s reduced their pressure by 30
psi instead of 25 psi, they would see a 2% increase in rolling
resistance. (Whoa!)

And perhaps I should specified that wider tires are less prone to
_pinch_ flats instead of just saying they're less prone to flats...

Hmm.

But how many riders carefully calibrate their new tires' pressure to
produce the same absolute (not percentage) tire drop? I've never heard
of anyone doing such a thing.

And if pinch flats are reduced but puncture flats are not affected, does
that not still indicate the tires are more resistant to flats overall?

Never mind. I'm sticking with my original statement. For typical riders'
behaviors and riding conditions, what I said is still true: Wider tires
of similar construction have less rolling resistance and fewer flats.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #23  
Old March 12th 21, 06:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 5,202
Default Eddy Merckx Elite

On Friday, March 12, 2021 at 11:36:57 a.m. UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 3/12/2021 4:52 AM, Lou Holtman wrote:
Op vrijdag 12 maart 2021 om 04:17:40 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/11/2021 12:43 PM, Lou Holtman wrote:
Op donderdag 11 maart 2021 om 17:09:32 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/10/2021 9:43 PM, John B. wrote:

Well there is the debate about the gravel and CX bikes but here,
essentially, all the roads, or at least all the roads I see, are
paved. I've been riding 23mm tires since I switched from "sew-ups".
I think the narrowest tires ever used for more than a short time were
25mm. I've spent most of my road riding time on 28s, some on 32s, a bit
on 35s or 37s when doing loaded touring.

It seems the latest data indicates the super narrow tires have no lower
rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider tires, unless you're
on a surface as smooth as a velodrome track. And wider tires tend to be
less flat prone and more comfortable.

That is a too simple conclusion. I mentioned this earlier:

https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
Well, there are always more details one can consider. Care to summarize
which further details you think need mention?


If someone states that tires of the same construction (ie. Continental GP5000) the wider version will have less RR and are more comfortable he/she is mistaken. This is easy to understand. Inflate the wider version to the same pressure and it will have less RR but also is less comfortable for the same reason: less vertical deflection when hitting a bump. As for the less prone to puncture statement this is only true for the pinch flat part. I always opposed to the less RR and more comfortable ride statements of people who never used tires of the same construction for both widths. I use Continental GP5000 tires in 25, 28 and 32 mm width and my observation is exactly on par with the results of the test I referred to. Besides the higher weight and being less aero you can achieve a lower RR with wider tires but they will be more uncomfortable. You can use wider tires at a lower pressure for traction and/or comfort on rough surface without an increased chance of a pinch flat but the RR will be more. To speak in your terms wider tires are more versatile but nothing comes for free.

OK, let's dive into the rabbit hole:

Perhaps I should not have said "... data indicates the super narrow
tires have no lower rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider
tires ..." without adding "... if pressures are within about 25 psi."

Because, according to the second graph at
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
if a person who switched from 23s to 32s reduced their pressure by 30
psi instead of 25 psi, they would see a 2% increase in rolling
resistance. (Whoa!)

And perhaps I should specified that wider tires are less prone to
_pinch_ flats instead of just saying they're less prone to flats...

Hmm.

But how many riders carefully calibrate their new tires' pressure to
produce the same absolute (not percentage) tire drop? I've never heard
of anyone doing such a thing.

And if pinch flats are reduced but puncture flats are not affected, does
that not still indicate the tires are more resistant to flats overall?

Never mind. I'm sticking with my original statement. For typical riders'
behaviors and riding conditions, what I said is still true: Wider tires
of similar construction have less rolling resistance and fewer flats.

--
- Frank Krygowski


My experience is that the harder a road tire is inflated the easier it is to puncture. My guess is that a hard tire doesn't deform as much when going over a sharp object and therefore the sharp object penetrates easier than with a lower pressure tire or even that tire at a lower pressure.

Cheers
  #24  
Old March 12th 21, 07:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Lou Holtman[_5_]
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Posts: 729
Default Eddy Merckx Elite

Op vrijdag 12 maart 2021 om 17:36:57 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/12/2021 4:52 AM, Lou Holtman wrote:
Op vrijdag 12 maart 2021 om 04:17:40 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/11/2021 12:43 PM, Lou Holtman wrote:
Op donderdag 11 maart 2021 om 17:09:32 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/10/2021 9:43 PM, John B. wrote:

Well there is the debate about the gravel and CX bikes but here,
essentially, all the roads, or at least all the roads I see, are
paved. I've been riding 23mm tires since I switched from "sew-ups".
I think the narrowest tires ever used for more than a short time were
25mm. I've spent most of my road riding time on 28s, some on 32s, a bit
on 35s or 37s when doing loaded touring.

It seems the latest data indicates the super narrow tires have no lower
rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider tires, unless you're
on a surface as smooth as a velodrome track. And wider tires tend to be
less flat prone and more comfortable.

That is a too simple conclusion. I mentioned this earlier:

https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
Well, there are always more details one can consider. Care to summarize
which further details you think need mention?


If someone states that tires of the same construction (ie. Continental GP5000) the wider version will have less RR and are more comfortable he/she is mistaken. This is easy to understand. Inflate the wider version to the same pressure and it will have less RR but also is less comfortable for the same reason: less vertical deflection when hitting a bump. As for the less prone to puncture statement this is only true for the pinch flat part. I always opposed to the less RR and more comfortable ride statements of people who never used tires of the same construction for both widths. I use Continental GP5000 tires in 25, 28 and 32 mm width and my observation is exactly on par with the results of the test I referred to. Besides the higher weight and being less aero you can achieve a lower RR with wider tires but they will be more uncomfortable. You can use wider tires at a lower pressure for traction and/or comfort on rough surface without an increased chance of a pinch flat but the RR will be more. To speak in your terms wider tires are more versatile but nothing comes for free.

OK, let's dive into the rabbit hole:

Perhaps I should not have said "... data indicates the super narrow
tires have no lower rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider
tires ..." without adding "... if pressures are within about 25 psi."

Because, according to the second graph at
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
if a person who switched from 23s to 32s reduced their pressure by 30
psi instead of 25 psi, they would see a 2% increase in rolling
resistance. (Whoa!)

And perhaps I should specified that wider tires are less prone to
_pinch_ flats instead of just saying they're less prone to flats...

Hmm.

But how many riders carefully calibrate their new tires' pressure to
produce the same absolute (not percentage) tire drop? I've never heard
of anyone doing such a thing.

And if pinch flats are reduced but puncture flats are not affected, does
that not still indicate the tires are more resistant to flats overall?

Never mind. I'm sticking with my original statement. For typical riders'
behaviors and riding conditions, what I said is still true: Wider tires
of similar construction have less rolling resistance and fewer flats.


Okey Dokey. Do you have data? Nevermind I knew I was wasting my time.

Lou
  #25  
Old March 12th 21, 08:18 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,170
Default Eddy Merckx Elite

On 3/12/2021 2:29 PM, Lou Holtman wrote:

Op vrijdag 12 maart 2021 om 17:36:57 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:

On 3/12/2021 4:52 AM, Lou Holtman wrote:

Op vrijdag 12 maart 2021 om 04:17:40 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/11/2021 12:43 PM, Lou Holtman wrote:
Op donderdag 11 maart 2021 om 17:09:32 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/10/2021 9:43 PM, John B. wrote:

Well there is the debate about the gravel and CX bikes but here,
essentially, all the roads, or at least all the roads I see, are
paved. I've been riding 23mm tires since I switched from "sew-ups".
I think the narrowest tires ever used for more than a short time were
25mm. I've spent most of my road riding time on 28s, some on 32s, a bit
on 35s or 37s when doing loaded touring.

It seems the latest data indicates the super narrow tires have no lower
rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider tires, unless you're
on a surface as smooth as a velodrome track. And wider tires tend to be
less flat prone and more comfortable.

That is a too simple conclusion. I mentioned this earlier:

https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
Well, there are always more details one can consider. Care to summarize
which further details you think need mention?


If someone states that tires of the same construction (ie. Continental GP5000) the wider version will have less RR and are more comfortable he/she is mistaken. This is easy to understand. Inflate the wider version to the same pressure and it will have less RR but also is less comfortable for the same reason: less vertical deflection when hitting a bump. As for the less prone to puncture statement this is only true for the pinch flat part. I always opposed to the less RR and more comfortable ride statements of people who never used tires of the same construction for both widths. I use Continental GP5000 tires in 25, 28 and 32 mm width and my observation is exactly on par with the results of the test I referred to. Besides the higher weight and being less aero you can achieve a lower RR with wider tires but they will be more uncomfortable. You can use wider tires at a lower pressure for traction and/or comfort on rough surface without an increased chance of a pinch flat but the RR will be more. To speak in your terms wider tires are more versatile but nothing comes for free.

OK, let's dive into the rabbit hole:

Perhaps I should not have said "... data indicates the super narrow
tires have no lower rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider
tires ..." without adding "... if pressures are within about 25 psi."

Because, according to the second graph at
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
if a person who switched from 23s to 32s reduced their pressure by 30
psi instead of 25 psi, they would see a 2% increase in rolling
resistance. (Whoa!)

And perhaps I should specified that wider tires are less prone to
_pinch_ flats instead of just saying they're less prone to flats...

Hmm.

But how many riders carefully calibrate their new tires' pressure to
produce the same absolute (not percentage) tire drop? I've never heard
of anyone doing such a thing.

And if pinch flats are reduced but puncture flats are not affected, does
that not still indicate the tires are more resistant to flats overall?

Never mind. I'm sticking with my original statement. For typical riders'
behaviors and riding conditions, what I said is still true: Wider tires
of similar construction have less rolling resistance and fewer flats.


Okey Dokey. Do you have data? Nevermind I knew I was wasting my time.


I used the data you provided: Graph of rolling resistance vs. pressure
for four different tire widths. Please review.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #26  
Old March 12th 21, 10:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,331
Default Eddy Merckx Elite

On Friday, March 12, 2021 at 11:29:55 AM UTC-8, wrote:
Op vrijdag 12 maart 2021 om 17:36:57 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/12/2021 4:52 AM, Lou Holtman wrote:
Op vrijdag 12 maart 2021 om 04:17:40 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/11/2021 12:43 PM, Lou Holtman wrote:
Op donderdag 11 maart 2021 om 17:09:32 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/10/2021 9:43 PM, John B. wrote:

Well there is the debate about the gravel and CX bikes but here,
essentially, all the roads, or at least all the roads I see, are
paved. I've been riding 23mm tires since I switched from "sew-ups".
I think the narrowest tires ever used for more than a short time were
25mm. I've spent most of my road riding time on 28s, some on 32s, a bit
on 35s or 37s when doing loaded touring.

It seems the latest data indicates the super narrow tires have no lower
rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider tires, unless you're
on a surface as smooth as a velodrome track. And wider tires tend to be
less flat prone and more comfortable.

That is a too simple conclusion. I mentioned this earlier:

https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
Well, there are always more details one can consider. Care to summarize
which further details you think need mention?


If someone states that tires of the same construction (ie. Continental GP5000) the wider version will have less RR and are more comfortable he/she is mistaken. This is easy to understand. Inflate the wider version to the same pressure and it will have less RR but also is less comfortable for the same reason: less vertical deflection when hitting a bump. As for the less prone to puncture statement this is only true for the pinch flat part. I always opposed to the less RR and more comfortable ride statements of people who never used tires of the same construction for both widths. I use Continental GP5000 tires in 25, 28 and 32 mm width and my observation is exactly on par with the results of the test I referred to. Besides the higher weight and being less aero you can achieve a lower RR with wider tires but they will be more uncomfortable. You can use wider tires at a lower pressure for traction and/or comfort on rough surface without an increased chance of a pinch flat but the RR will be more. To speak in your terms wider tires are more versatile but nothing comes for free.

OK, let's dive into the rabbit hole:

Perhaps I should not have said "... data indicates the super narrow
tires have no lower rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider
tires ..." without adding "... if pressures are within about 25 psi."

Because, according to the second graph at
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
if a person who switched from 23s to 32s reduced their pressure by 30
psi instead of 25 psi, they would see a 2% increase in rolling
resistance. (Whoa!)

And perhaps I should specified that wider tires are less prone to
_pinch_ flats instead of just saying they're less prone to flats...

Hmm.

But how many riders carefully calibrate their new tires' pressure to
produce the same absolute (not percentage) tire drop? I've never heard
of anyone doing such a thing.

And if pinch flats are reduced but puncture flats are not affected, does
that not still indicate the tires are more resistant to flats overall?

Never mind. I'm sticking with my original statement. For typical riders'
behaviors and riding conditions, what I said is still true: Wider tires
of similar construction have less rolling resistance and fewer flats.

Okey Dokey. Do you have data? Nevermind I knew I was wasting my time.

Lou

You weren't wasting your time with me. Those numbers pretty much proved my beliefs.
  #27  
Old March 12th 21, 10:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,233
Default Eddy Merckx Elite

On Fri, 12 Mar 2021 06:17:44 -0800 (PST), Tom Kunich
wrote:

On Wednesday, March 10, 2021 at 11:36:45 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Wednesday, March 10, 2021 at 7:03:14 PM UTC-6, John B. wrote:
Claims a $40,000 income one month and buys second hand junk

John B.


Is that $40k per YEAR, or per MONTH? If its per month, then even in expensive California that should be enough to get you into the middle class and allow you to live somewhat comfortably if you watch some of your pennies. I'm sure $480,000 per year does not go too far in California, but it should be OK enough. Now, if its $40,000 per year, then one would have to watch what junk they buy second hand. But even with a mere $40,000 per year, even in expensive California you should be able to feed yourself and keep some kind of roof over your head and buy a used K-Mart bike every year or two.


That is taxable income per year though I'm now not far from making that per month. But making money and spending money when Biden is in power wouldn't be very smart now would it. Where it is is inflation safe. Biden has sent us down the road to super inflation and according to Frank, that's no problem at all because he doesn't give one **** about the rest of the world and all of the people in it as long as he can get along. The normal communist schpeal.


Well yes The Demo's are going to hand out something like 1.9 trillion
to you poor victims of the virus. And it is likely that dumping that
much into the economy will cause some level of inflation.

So what's the solution? Everyone should refuse the (I read) $1,400
that the Government wants to give you?

"Fight Inflation! Don't Take The Money!"
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #28  
Old March 12th 21, 11:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,233
Default Eddy Merckx Elite

On Fri, 12 Mar 2021 06:36:19 -0800 (PST), Tom Kunich
wrote:

On Thursday, March 11, 2021 at 7:17:40 PM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 3/11/2021 12:43 PM, Lou Holtman wrote:
Op donderdag 11 maart 2021 om 17:09:32 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/10/2021 9:43 PM, John B. wrote:

Well there is the debate about the gravel and CX bikes but here,
essentially, all the roads, or at least all the roads I see, are
paved. I've been riding 23mm tires since I switched from "sew-ups".
I think the narrowest tires ever used for more than a short time were
25mm. I've spent most of my road riding time on 28s, some on 32s, a bit
on 35s or 37s when doing loaded touring.

It seems the latest data indicates the super narrow tires have no lower
rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider tires, unless you're
on a surface as smooth as a velodrome track. And wider tires tend to be
less flat prone and more comfortable.

That is a too simple conclusion. I mentioned this earlier:

https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison

Well, there are always more details one can consider. Care to summarize
which further details you think need mention?

Well. I designed the first full time working heart-lung machine and the respiratory gas analyzer both of which you will no doubt make use of in the very near future. From you comments you nearly have a heart attack when you make your unfounded assertions and it turns out that I have wide experience in those fields and can see you for the fool you are.


The first successful heart-lung machine was developed by John H.
Gibbon, Jr. who In 1953, at Jefferson Medical College, Gibbon
connected the circulatory system of an 18-year-old female to a new
machine, stopped the woman’s heart, and for 26 minutes performed
surgery to close a hole in the wall of the heart between the left and
right atria. It was the first successful use of a heart-lung machine
https://www.encyclopedia.com/medicin...t-lung-machine
That was when you were 9 years old.

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #29  
Old March 12th 21, 11:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Mark J.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 815
Default Eddy Merckx Elite

On 3/12/2021 3:06 PM, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 12 Mar 2021 06:36:19 -0800 (PST), Tom Kunich
wrote:

On Thursday, March 11, 2021 at 7:17:40 PM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 3/11/2021 12:43 PM, Lou Holtman wrote:
Op donderdag 11 maart 2021 om 17:09:32 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/10/2021 9:43 PM, John B. wrote:

Well there is the debate about the gravel and CX bikes but here,
essentially, all the roads, or at least all the roads I see, are
paved. I've been riding 23mm tires since I switched from "sew-ups".
I think the narrowest tires ever used for more than a short time were
25mm. I've spent most of my road riding time on 28s, some on 32s, a bit
on 35s or 37s when doing loaded touring.

It seems the latest data indicates the super narrow tires have no lower
rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider tires, unless you're
on a surface as smooth as a velodrome track. And wider tires tend to be
less flat prone and more comfortable.

That is a too simple conclusion. I mentioned this earlier:

https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
Well, there are always more details one can consider. Care to summarize
which further details you think need mention?

Well. I designed the first full time working heart-lung machine and the respiratory gas analyzer both of which you will no doubt make use of in the very near future. From you comments you nearly have a heart attack when you make your unfounded assertions and it turns out that I have wide experience in those fields and can see you for the fool you are.


The first successful heart-lung machine was developed by John H.
Gibbon, Jr. who In 1953, at Jefferson Medical College, Gibbon
connected the circulatory system of an 18-year-old female to a new
machine, stopped the woman’s heart, and for 26 minutes performed
surgery to close a hole in the wall of the heart between the left and
right atria. It was the first successful use of a heart-lung machine
https://www.encyclopedia.com/medicin...t-lung-machine
That was when you were 9 years old.


Clearly a prodigy.

Mark J.
  #30  
Old March 13th 21, 12:14 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,233
Default Eddy Merckx Elite

On Fri, 12 Mar 2021 15:41:21 -0800, "Mark J."
wrote:

On 3/12/2021 3:06 PM, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 12 Mar 2021 06:36:19 -0800 (PST), Tom Kunich
wrote:

On Thursday, March 11, 2021 at 7:17:40 PM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 3/11/2021 12:43 PM, Lou Holtman wrote:
Op donderdag 11 maart 2021 om 17:09:32 UTC+1 schreef Frank Krygowski:
On 3/10/2021 9:43 PM, John B. wrote:

Well there is the debate about the gravel and CX bikes but here,
essentially, all the roads, or at least all the roads I see, are
paved. I've been riding 23mm tires since I switched from "sew-ups".
I think the narrowest tires ever used for more than a short time were
25mm. I've spent most of my road riding time on 28s, some on 32s, a bit
on 35s or 37s when doing loaded touring.

It seems the latest data indicates the super narrow tires have no lower
rolling resistance than similarly constructed wider tires, unless you're
on a surface as smooth as a velodrome track. And wider tires tend to be
less flat prone and more comfortable.

That is a too simple conclusion. I mentioned this earlier:

https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...000-comparison
Well, there are always more details one can consider. Care to summarize
which further details you think need mention?
Well. I designed the first full time working heart-lung machine and the respiratory gas analyzer both of which you will no doubt make use of in the very near future. From you comments you nearly have a heart attack when you make your unfounded assertions and it turns out that I have wide experience in those fields and can see you for the fool you are.


The first successful heart-lung machine was developed by John H.
Gibbon, Jr. who In 1953, at Jefferson Medical College, Gibbon
connected the circulatory system of an 18-year-old female to a new
machine, stopped the woman’s heart, and for 26 minutes performed
surgery to close a hole in the wall of the heart between the left and
right atria. It was the first successful use of a heart-lung machine
https://www.encyclopedia.com/medicin...t-lung-machine
That was when you were 9 years old.


Clearly a prodigy.

Mark J.


Well, as Abraham Lincoln was reported to have said, "No man has a
good enough memory to be a successful liar" :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.

 




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