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Eyc headlight problem



 
 
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  #171  
Old April 7th 21, 03:45 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,334
Default Safety inflation

On 4/7/2021 12:58 AM, Lou Holtman wrote:

snip

I like my backup camera. Is it safer? I don't know but it prevents unnecessary damage and you can see more than looking over your shoulder and the use of only mirrors. Navagation is in practice definiately safer compared to looking at a paper map or cue card when driving alone. Phone use should be banned in a car. All the assist aids can make people lazy but they make it safer for some people. I turned of most of them in my care.


Agreed. A backup camera usually has a very wide angle lens so you can
see people on the sidewalk or in the parking lot even when adjacent
vehicles block your view from the driver's seat. When I replaced the
radio/CD/cassette player in my 2001 Toyota SUV with a double-DIN head
unit it had an input for a backup camera. A camera that attached to the
license plate bolts was $20 (plus a couple of hours of work running the
video cable).
Ads
  #172  
Old April 7th 21, 04:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,134
Default Safety inflation

On 4/6/2021 11:38 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, April 6, 2021 at 7:47:20 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:

Let me interject that you seem a bit confused about what "safety
inflation" is intended to mean. It's more complicated than simply
labeling something as dangerous. It's a demand for ever more safety
precautions, with the implication that what was recently considered
adequately safe is now considered dangerous. If you want to discuss
this, you might keep that in mind.

There have always been people who feel riding a bike on a road is
dangerous. Most of them are demonstrably wrong (although most probably
wouldn't understand the demonstration). I'm sure that a large number of
indoor cyclists (a group comprising much more than the "gym scene") are
part of that fearful group. But that in itself is not necessarily
evidence of safety _inflation_. Perhaps the charitable way to describe
it is timidity caused by lack of knowledge.
And a lot of what you call safety inflation is people just not wanting to deal with traffic.

You're definitely missing the concept. Let's try a non-cycling example.
I just borrowed a friend's new car to get takeout food for a shared
dinner. Some of its features, compared to cars deemed safe enough 15
years ago:

Instead of two airbags (once considered plenty) it has a constellation
of airbags. Pretty much the entire interior inflates in case of a crash.
It's safer than before.

Instead of simple side view mirrors (once considered sufficient) it has
mirrors with internal turn signal lights and a sensor system to tell if
there's a car in a blind spot. It also has lights in the mirrors that
come on any time a door is cracked. They're safer than before.

Of course it has anti-lock brakes. Those were on some cars 15 years ago,
but now they're on all cars. Because it's safer.

It has "lane departure assist" or something like that. It nudges the car
back in the lane if it "sees" you getting too close to a lane line.
Somehow, we used to be safe enough without that.

It has all wheel drive, even though it's not an off-road vehicle and
never will be. I've always felt safe enough being driven by just two of
the four wheels. But all wheel is now promoted, for "safety" reasons, on
regular roads.

It has a backup camera. Once upon a time, we used mirrors to back up.
The camera is easier, of course - but it's also safer.

I could probably go on, but here's my major point: There was a time when
nobody thought a car was dangerous because it had only belts instead of
air bags, simple mirrors without cameras, ordinary brakes, two wheel
drive and steering that you had to operate yourself to stay in a highway
lane. But now, at least for many people, that's just not safe enough.

It's possible to give a myriad of other examples, not just cars or
bicycles. Safety inflation is a fact. Again, I don't know why pointing
this out offends you.


It doesn't offend me, except its tedious. You claim that bicycle facilities are "safety inflation." Basically any convenience from STI to discs is safety inflation. I'm sure padded bar-tape is safety inflation.


Do you find Scharf's claims tedious, that we should all be using DRL
headlights with "breathe" mode whenever we ride? How about Joerg's
claims that he'd be dead on the trail if not for disc brakes? When Bike
Portland says you need to ride through a cattle chute running between
bus stops and pedestrians on sidewalks so you can be safe?

And as someone who peeled people out of the insides of '50s and '60s cars, they were dangerous...


You're using a simplistic and binary definition of "dangerous." There's
a full spectrum between "dangerous" and "safe" but you're making a
personal judgment that treats the spectrum as black vs. white. My point
is, there's been a overwhelming tendency to shift those personal
judgments and to label more and more things as "dangerous" or at least
"not safe enough."

And I doubt you were consistent in your evaluation. Did you not ride in
cars like the ones you just labeled "dangerous"? What driver protection
was built into the ambulance you drove? Did you at least drive while
wearing a helmet?

and all that car safety inflation stuff you mention -- who cares. Be safe.


The car safety stuff was my attempt to demonstrate the existence of the
trend, or meme, or attitude by using examples that wouldn't raise your
bicycling hackles.

And with cars, I don't care much. But there is a downside for bicycling.
Every time a Scharf says "Anyone with any sense always uses a helmet and
a DRL" it _does_ imply simply riding a bike is dangerous. Someone will
say "I don't want to risk it" or "I don't want my kid to do it." My view
is, this causes net harm to society.

Again, it's not just bicycling. American kids are now restricted in
their play activities as never before. Safe Kids once published
guidelines saying kids should never be outside without adult
supervision, and kids less than age ten should never cross a street
without an adult's help. Who cares? The pediatricians and health experts
who are seeing child obesity soar.

"Safety first!" Safety safety safety! You can't be too safe! If only
_one_ life can be saved!" That's being applied to hundreds of
situations, and it's tedious and borderline neurotic. I'm far from the
only one saying so - I have books and articles on the subject. I'm just
pointing out it also applies to bicycling. Sorry that offends you.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #173  
Old April 7th 21, 06:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,606
Default Safety inflation

On Wednesday, April 7, 2021 at 8:06:31 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 4/6/2021 11:38 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, April 6, 2021 at 7:47:20 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:

Let me interject that you seem a bit confused about what "safety
inflation" is intended to mean. It's more complicated than simply
labeling something as dangerous. It's a demand for ever more safety
precautions, with the implication that what was recently considered
adequately safe is now considered dangerous. If you want to discuss
this, you might keep that in mind.

There have always been people who feel riding a bike on a road is
dangerous. Most of them are demonstrably wrong (although most probably
wouldn't understand the demonstration). I'm sure that a large number of
indoor cyclists (a group comprising much more than the "gym scene") are
part of that fearful group. But that in itself is not necessarily
evidence of safety _inflation_. Perhaps the charitable way to describe
it is timidity caused by lack of knowledge.
And a lot of what you call safety inflation is people just not wanting to deal with traffic.
You're definitely missing the concept. Let's try a non-cycling example..
I just borrowed a friend's new car to get takeout food for a shared
dinner. Some of its features, compared to cars deemed safe enough 15
years ago:

Instead of two airbags (once considered plenty) it has a constellation
of airbags. Pretty much the entire interior inflates in case of a crash.
It's safer than before.

Instead of simple side view mirrors (once considered sufficient) it has
mirrors with internal turn signal lights and a sensor system to tell if
there's a car in a blind spot. It also has lights in the mirrors that
come on any time a door is cracked. They're safer than before.

Of course it has anti-lock brakes. Those were on some cars 15 years ago,
but now they're on all cars. Because it's safer.

It has "lane departure assist" or something like that. It nudges the car
back in the lane if it "sees" you getting too close to a lane line.
Somehow, we used to be safe enough without that.

It has all wheel drive, even though it's not an off-road vehicle and
never will be. I've always felt safe enough being driven by just two of
the four wheels. But all wheel is now promoted, for "safety" reasons, on
regular roads.

It has a backup camera. Once upon a time, we used mirrors to back up.
The camera is easier, of course - but it's also safer.

I could probably go on, but here's my major point: There was a time when
nobody thought a car was dangerous because it had only belts instead of
air bags, simple mirrors without cameras, ordinary brakes, two wheel
drive and steering that you had to operate yourself to stay in a highway
lane. But now, at least for many people, that's just not safe enough.

It's possible to give a myriad of other examples, not just cars or
bicycles. Safety inflation is a fact. Again, I don't know why pointing
this out offends you.


It doesn't offend me, except its tedious. You claim that bicycle facilities are "safety inflation." Basically any convenience from STI to discs is safety inflation. I'm sure padded bar-tape is safety inflation.

Do you find Scharf's claims tedious, that we should all be using DRL
headlights with "breathe" mode whenever we ride? How about Joerg's
claims that he'd be dead on the trail if not for disc brakes? When Bike
Portland says you need to ride through a cattle chute running between
bus stops and pedestrians on sidewalks so you can be safe?

And as someone who peeled people out of the insides of '50s and '60s cars, they were dangerous...


You're using a simplistic and binary definition of "dangerous." There's
a full spectrum between "dangerous" and "safe" but you're making a
personal judgment that treats the spectrum as black vs. white. My point
is, there's been a overwhelming tendency to shift those personal
judgments and to label more and more things as "dangerous" or at least
"not safe enough."

And I doubt you were consistent in your evaluation. Did you not ride in
cars like the ones you just labeled "dangerous"? What driver protection
was built into the ambulance you drove? Did you at least drive while
wearing a helmet?
and all that car safety inflation stuff you mention -- who cares. Be safe.

The car safety stuff was my attempt to demonstrate the existence of the
trend, or meme, or attitude by using examples that wouldn't raise your
bicycling hackles.


Yes, I rode in old cars and didn't wear seatbelts, etc., and I was in a unique position starting at an early age to see the benefits of modern -- gasp -- safety improvements. The metal dashes and non-collapsing steering columns, and absence of passenger restraints in old vehicles tended to mangle the occupant and allowed them to be ejected from the car. Anyone with a brain would chose the safer option. Why not? Why is that a bad thing?

The ambulances I typical drove were Miller Meteors on Caddy chasses -- in fact, this exact one being driven by a guy who I worked with and who got rich and became a collector. http://www.riponmenloparkpolicecarsh...ler-Meteor.jpg Passenger protection included competent drivers, seat belts, padded dash, collapsible steering columns and a massive engine between me and the rest of the world. Later vans and Modulances had the same features.


And with cars, I don't care much. But there is a downside for bicycling.
Every time a Scharf says "Anyone with any sense always uses a helmet and
a DRL" it _does_ imply simply riding a bike is dangerous. Someone will
say "I don't want to risk it" or "I don't want my kid to do it." My view
is, this causes net harm to society.

Again, it's not just bicycling. American kids are now restricted in
their play activities as never before. Safe Kids once published
guidelines saying kids should never be outside without adult
supervision, and kids less than age ten should never cross a street
without an adult's help. Who cares? The pediatricians and health experts
who are seeing child obesity soar.

"Safety first!" Safety safety safety! You can't be too safe! If only
_one_ life can be saved!" That's being applied to hundreds of
situations, and it's tedious and borderline neurotic. I'm far from the
only one saying so - I have books and articles on the subject. I'm just
pointing out it also applies to bicycling. Sorry that offends you.


It's certainly neurotic for you. You're like Cassandra on a bike. I don't particularly care what personal choices people make so long as they do not make riding more dangerous for me. Overpowered lights -- which can be re-aimed or turned down -- do affect me. DRLs don't, nor does fluorescent clothing. There is no adult MHL in Oregon, but I wear a helmet because it has provided protection for me in the past, so I really wouldn't care.

BTW, there are books about everything, and your arguments simply beg the question of what is safe enough. 1952 safe? 1992 safe? Should we go back to smoking and getting our feet X-rayed in shoe stores? Where do you draw the line -- particularly with an aging, distracted population that now spends most of its time looking at tiny video displays. Are there some people who are too scared? Yes, but they're not the ones with DRLs and fluorescent jerseys because I see those guys and gals out riding all the time. Nobody gives me a hard time because I don't have a DRL or (usually) a fluorescent jersey. I have to admit that my Gabba jersey is safety green.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #174  
Old April 7th 21, 10:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,809
Default Safety inflation

On Wed, 7 Apr 2021 10:16:14 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

Where do you draw the line -- particularly with an aging, distracted
population that now spends most of its time looking at tiny video displays.
(...)


You're not safe until you're equipped with ALL the necessary safety
gadgets and gizmos:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/crud/Bicycle-Safety.jpg
Hmmm... no Covid-19 mask.

--
Jeff Liebermann
PO Box 272
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #175  
Old April 7th 21, 10:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,606
Default Safety inflation

On Wednesday, April 7, 2021 at 2:17:13 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Wed, 7 Apr 2021 10:16:14 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:
Where do you draw the line -- particularly with an aging, distracted
population that now spends most of its time looking at tiny video displays.
(...)


You're not safe until you're equipped with ALL the necessary safety
gadgets and gizmos:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/crud/Bicycle-Safety.jpg
Hmmm... no Covid-19 mask.

--
Jeff Liebermann
PO Box 272 http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


Oddly, CPSC standards are minimal, although the reflector standards are weird and usually disregarded. https://www.cpsc.gov/Business--Manuf...e-Requirements And they apply to the sale of bicycles and have nothing to do with the operation of bicycles.. Equipment required to operate on the road is dictated by local law.

-- Jay Beattie.





  #176  
Old April 7th 21, 11:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,334
Default Safety inflation

On 4/7/2021 10:16 AM, jbeattie wrote:

snip

Yes, I rode in old cars and didn't wear seatbelts, etc., and I was in a unique position starting at an early age to see the benefits of modern -- gasp -- safety improvements. The metal dashes and non-collapsing steering columns, and absence of passenger restraints in old vehicles tended to mangle the occupant and allowed them to be ejected from the car. Anyone with a brain would chose the safer option. Why not? Why is that a bad thing?


There's a key difference between added safety features on motor vehicles
and added safety features on bicycles.

On a motor vehicle many of the safety features are to protect other road
users, not just the drive and passengers of the vehicle with those features.

While seat belts, shoulder belts, safety glass, collapsible steering
columns, reinforced doors, a third brake light, crumple zones, and
padded dashboards protect only the driver and the passengers, ABS,
traction control, TPMS, lane-departure warning, back-up cameras, and
collision sensors, also protect others. Fortunately, the cost of adding
the latter safety systems is quite low because sensors, actuators, and
cameras don't cost much (Honda was especially clever with their
sensorless TPMS, see
https://rts.i-car.com/collision-repair-news/tpms-without-the-sensor-in-the-tire.html
since replacing TPMS sensors when the battery is exhausted is expensive).

You don't see anyone giving up driving just because even low-priced new
cars now come with most of those safety systems. They don't think, "gee
all these safety features must mean that driving a car is exceptionally
dangerous."

I don't see the necrosis, that some claim exists, regarding kids, though
I do see that some people that almost _want_ to believe that it exists,
complaining about "the kids these days."

I still recall when they opened a new middle school in my town. The
school district put in a small bicycle parking area thinking "these
helicopter parents are so neurotic that they'll never let their kids
ride a bicycle to school." Within a week parents and students were
complaining that there was no place to park a bike because so many kids
were riding to school; the school hastily added another bicycle parking
area. Sure there are over-protective parents that wouldn't dream of
letting their kids bike to school, but those have always existed.

The wisdom of using a decent bicycle light that lets motor vehicles
notice you, especially when drivers are more distracted than ever,
shouldn't even be subject to any debate. Fortunately we've come a long
way from bottle dynamos and Wald D cell flashlight holders and most
cyclists understand that lights that let you both see and be seen are a
good idea. Similarly, adopting traffic calming that forces motor
vehicles to obey the law and share the road should be something that
everyone favors (though it is true that some high-speed riders are
frustrated by protected bicycle lanes because they can get stuck behind
a slower rider).
  #177  
Old April 7th 21, 11:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,809
Default Safety inflation

On Wed, 7 Apr 2021 14:48:59 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Wednesday, April 7, 2021 at 2:17:13 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Wed, 7 Apr 2021 10:16:14 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:
Where do you draw the line -- particularly with an aging, distracted
population that now spends most of its time looking at tiny video displays.
(...)


You're not safe until you're equipped with ALL the necessary safety
gadgets and gizmos:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/crud/Bicycle-Safety.jpg
Hmmm... no Covid-19 mask.


Oddly, CPSC standards are minimal, although the reflector standards
are weird and usually disregarded.
https://www.cpsc.gov/Business--Manuf...e-Requirements
And they apply to the sale of bicycles and have nothing to do with the
operation of bicycles. Equipment required to operate on the road is
dictated by local law.
-- Jay Beattie.


https://www.cpsc.gov/Regulations-Laws--Standards/Voluntary-Standards/Topics/Bicycles
"U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) staff
is participating in voluntary standard activities..."

Note the word "voluntary". Once the various voluntary standards are
ossified in ASCII, it only takes a little editing and a quick vote of
the local government(s), and they become law and are made mandatory.
That's how we got the local building codes from what was originally
the NFPA voluntary recommendations for fire-safe construction. Today,
bicycle safety recommendations may be a voluntary cartoon joke.
Tomorrow, they might be the law. In any case, it would not take much
inspiration for a manufacturer of bicycle accessories to morph into a
bicycle safety hardware supplier and encourage the sales of his
products by accelerating the transition from cartoon to law.

You're going to be safe, even if it kills you. (I forgot from where I
stole that).

--
Jeff Liebermann
PO Box 272
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #178  
Old April 8th 21, 12:13 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,334
Default Safety inflation

On 4/7/2021 3:43 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

snip

Note the word "voluntary". Once the various voluntary standards are
ossified in ASCII, it only takes a little editing and a quick vote of
the local government(s), and they become law and are made mandatory.
That's how we got the local building codes from what was originally
the NFPA voluntary recommendations for fire-safe construction. Today,
bicycle safety recommendations may be a voluntary cartoon joke.
Tomorrow, they might be the law. In any case, it would not take much
inspiration for a manufacturer of bicycle accessories to morph into a
bicycle safety hardware supplier and encourage the sales of his
products by accelerating the transition from cartoon to law.


Yet helmet manufacturers have not had much, if any, success in the the
U.S. of passing adult MHLs. A few medical organizations have lobbied for
such laws, on occasion, without success.

MHLs for children are widespread but ironically these tend to promote
more cycling because so many parents seem to believe that a helmet
offers more protection than it actually does; that's fine, bicycling is
not exceptionally dangerous and if it takes a helmet law to convince
parents to let their kids ride then so be it.

Even without an MHL most cyclists choose to wear helmets because of all
statistical evidence on their effectiveness. Education is better than
compulsion IMVAIO. The helmet manufacturers probably don't care much,
about MHLs since the passage of such laws would have minimal impact on
sales.
  #179  
Old April 8th 21, 01:38 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,198
Default Eyc headlight problem

On Wed, 07 Apr 2021 07:36:14 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 4/6/2021 9:43 PM, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 6 Apr 2021 10:03:02 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 4/5/2021 10:32 PM, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 5 Apr 2021 08:03:52 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Monday, April 5, 2021 at 1:53:37 AM UTC-7, Sepp Ruf wrote:
jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, April 3, 2021 at 4:32:13 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 4/3/2021 12:57 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I think it was Jay Beattie who suggested the 800 lumen number. I
merely stole it from him. I agree that 800 lumens probably too much.
However, if such a high power dynamo product ever arrives on the
market, there will surely be a lumens war among vendors to see who
can advertise the largest number. At that time, 800 lumens will be
reserved for purists and regulatory agencies.
This is how a low and high beams, 400 dynamo, optional 400 extra battery
lumens, conversion looks like:
https://www.velomobilforum.de/forum/index.php?attachments/pxl_20210121_153046943-jpg.231317/

The beams look better in reality than they appear on youtube, but I cannot
recommend the upgrade to Jay because he seems mortally afraid of further
increasing his dynamo system's sunk cost (and because a Luxos not considered
watertight).

Mortally afraid is more like "it would be stupid." I have enough lights.

Yep, safety inflation is real.

Since when is being able to see "safety inflation"? Let's go for a night
ride sometime, you and your bottle dyno and light, and me and my whatever
light I chose. I'll wait for you at the bottom. On flat roads and the
bike path through South Waterfront I can get by with a little flea-watt
flasher or a clip on flashlight from 1968 -- or my old Wonder Light. But
that is not where I do (or did pre DST) most of my riding.
Frank is not acquainted with Portland's exotic rain-forest, mountain-bunny
routes. If you are interested in a regular contest, ask a local, like your
son, to take the dyno lamp. Make sure you use Specialized's prototype Zn-C
matrix battery fork for extra power!
Everything
involves a descent, often on old broken concrete roads. I've done those
on dyno only, and its inadequate except at a creeping pace.
When will you finally invite a few fixie-riding antifa for a blissful summer
of subbotnik road repairs?! Oh, wait, repairing and recreating historic
concrete plates is horrendously "CO2 emissions intensive." If you aren't Al
Gore, you simply won't get a permit.

They don't re-do concrete, at least not often in town -- it gets asphalt. One of my routes was repaved in the last year or so, but I think some of neighborhoods don't want repaving because the broken concrete roads act as natural speed bumps. Two, essentially parallel streets: https://tinyurl.com/4n2dfzp8 and next door: https://tinyurl.com/kdrfm2t8
Look out for the manhole down the street: https://tinyurl.com/8a8w383f

I have no idea why they paved one and not the other. I rarely go down those roads -- they're part of the return route from anywhere east, and my pre-plague commute home. I creep up them, LUXOS B blazing the way. This is where I see people's feet before the people -- or their dogs with lighted dog vests.

-- Jay Beattie.

I would comment that those are appallingly poorly built roads. It
appears that they simply laid concrete over an existing, probably,
dirt road. I would guess that the residents bitched about a dirt road
and so the highway department slapped some concrete down and said
"There! A paved road".

Apparently that happened here.

Our County Engineering office always has a booth at the annual county
fair. One year I asked about that - about the process by which farm
roads that were once gravel on dirt got paved.

The young engineers staffing the booth looked at each other, then
explained that long ago (maybe the 1950s or 1960s?) the guy who was
county engineer got re-elected by suddenly paving a huge number of
roads. But the "paving" was just dropping asphalt on top of existing
gravel, with no preparation at all.

I know our county is notorious for potholes. It's not unusual to follow
an ex farm road across our county line and see a huge difference in
pavement smoothness and quality.


I'm not any sort of Civil Engineer but I worked for a while with a guy
that built roads for a living and according to him the underlying
foundation is the most important part of a road, particularly allowing
for water drainage. He also said that these design criteria have been
know since the days when the Romans were building roads :-)


Many of which are still in use. Roman engineering is not
fully appreciated; roads, yes but especially their concrete:

https://www.history.com/news/the-sec...roman-concrete


They also used fake stone facing on concrete buildings as concrete was
considered as rather plebeian while stone was very upmarket :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #180  
Old April 8th 21, 02:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,134
Default Safety inflation

On 4/7/2021 5:17 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Wed, 7 Apr 2021 10:16:14 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

Where do you draw the line -- particularly with an aging, distracted
population that now spends most of its time looking at tiny video displays.
(...)


You're not safe until you're equipped with ALL the necessary safety
gadgets and gizmos:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/crud/Bicycle-Safety.jpg


I love it! :-)

--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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