A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Serious Tire Questions for the uninitiated



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old April 6th 21, 07:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,314
Default Serious Tire Questions for the uninitiated

On Tuesday, April 6, 2021 at 11:42:50 AM UTC-7, wrote:
Op dinsdag 6 april 2021 om 18:16:54 UTC+2 schreef :
On Tuesday, April 6, 2021 at 9:05:18 AM UTC-7, Mark cleary wrote:
I notice that the Conti GP 5000 I have and even the old GP II 4's, have a direction of rotation on the sidewall. Now mind you I so far have put the tires with the proper rotational direction, but what happens if you don't. My guess is if you put them on the opposite way then does the bike go backwards when I start pedaling? Do the tires wear out different, or possible be off balance. But seriously what is the catch?
Deacon Mark

Supposedly they are not supposed to have the same braking traction in the reverse direction.

My complaints with them is that they wear so quickly. They DO have great traction but I don't think that it is any better than the Michelin Pro4. I have also used the Michelin Power Endurance and they work well too. But the Pro4's have a more reasonable price and don't wear so quickly.

Another datapoint. I recently replaced the rear Continental GP5000 tire (32 mm version) after the first flat after 5500 km. Best allround tire IMO. I must admit that I seldom pay attention to the mounting direction mainly because I'm too lazy to look for the hard to see arrow in bad light conditions in my garage.


Well, My 28 mm tires take forever to wear out. So I don't think it would be unusual for a 32 to wear forever. The Conti's that I was using for centuries were 25 mm and they lasted about two months per pair. That would be about 1,500 miles That's about 2,500 KM but other tires wear a great deal longer and so i often don't inspect the tires until I start getting flats.
Ads
  #12  
Old April 6th 21, 08:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Claus Amann[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Serious Tire Questions for the uninitiated

Mark cleary wrote:
[directional markers on tyres]

They are there so people don't ask the manufacturer which way to
mount the tyres.
Of course instead they get question whether the direction is
important.

--
Note: please read the netiquette before posting. I will almost never
reply to top-postings which include a full copy of the previous
article(s) at the end because it's annoying, shows that the poster
is too lazy to trim his article, and it's wasting the time of all readers.
  #13  
Old April 7th 21, 12:57 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 167
Default Serious Tire Questions for the uninitiated

Lou Holtman wrote:
Op dinsdag 6 april 2021 om 18:16:54 UTC+2 schreef :
On Tuesday, April 6, 2021 at 9:05:18 AM UTC-7, Mark cleary wrote:
I notice that the Conti GP 5000 I have and even the old GP II 4's, have
a direction of rotation on the sidewall. Now mind you I so far have put
the tires with the proper rotational direction, but what happens if you
don't. My guess is if you put them on the opposite way then does the
bike go backwards when I start pedaling? Do the tires wear out
different, or possible be off balance. But seriously what is the catch?
Deacon Mark

Supposedly they are not supposed to have the same braking traction in
the reverse direction.

My complaints with them is that they wear so quickly. They DO have great
traction but I don't think that it is any better than the Michelin Pro4.
I have also used the Michelin Power Endurance and they work well too.
But the Pro4's have a more reasonable price and don't wear so quickly.


Another datapoint. I recently replaced the rear Continental GP5000 tire
(32 mm version) after the first flat after 5500 km. Best allround tire
IMO. I must admit that I seldom pay attention to the mounting direction
mainly because I'm too lazy to look for the hard to see arrow in bad
light conditions in my garage.

Lou


They certainly feel good so far. I’ll see how they last.

Shark fins tell you the direction.

  #14  
Old April 12th 21, 08:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 142
Default Serious Tire Questions for the uninitiated

On Tuesday, April 6, 2021 at 1:10:55 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 4/6/2021 12:05 PM, Mark cleary wrote:
I notice that the Conti GP 5000 I have and even the old GP II 4's, have a direction of rotation on the sidewall. Now mind you I so far have put the tires with the proper rotational direction, but what happens if you don't.. My guess is if you put them on the opposite way then does the bike go backwards when I start pedaling? Do the tires wear out different, or possible be off balance. But seriously what is the catch?
Deacon Mark

Schwalbe says that for road tires, it's essentially cosmetic.

From https://www.schwalbe.com/en/profil
"Why are so many treads direction dependant? [sic]

"In the case of a road tire the rolling direction is mainly important
for aesthetic considerations. Tires marked with arrows simply look more
dynamic..

"Off road, the rolling direction is far more important, as the tread
ensures optimumconnection between the tire and the ground. The rear
wheel transmits the driving force and the front wheel transmits the
braking and steering forces. Driving and braking forces operate in
different directions. That is why certain tires are fitted in opposite
rotating directions when used as front and rear tires.

"There are also treads without a specified rotating direction."



--
- Frank Krygowski


Even off-road directional rotation doesn't make much difference - you have to really push the limits of the tire in order to realize a difference, which is generally much more aggressive than any non-racer would attempt. I remember an article in velonews probably 20 years ago where an engineer for Specialized was interviewed on this very subject. He said choosing the right tread for the terrain is vastly more important than being concerned about the direction of the tread. He even gave the idea of front/rear specific off-road designs a big "meh".
  #15  
Old Yesterday, 07:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tosspot[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default Serious Tire Questions for the uninitiated

On 06/04/2021 19:10, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 4/6/2021 12:05 PM, Mark cleary wrote:
I notice that the Conti GP 5000 I have and even the old GP II 4's,
have a direction of rotation on the sidewall. Now mind you I so far
have put the tires with the proper rotational direction, but what
happens if you don't. My guess is if you put them on the opposite way
then does the bike go backwards when I start pedaling? Do the tires
wear out different, or possible be off balance. But seriously what is
the catch?
Deacon Mark



Schwalbe says that for road tires, it's essentially cosmetic.

From https://www.schwalbe.com/en/profil
"Why are so many treads direction dependant?* [sic]

"In the case of a road tire the rolling direction is mainly important
for aesthetic considerations. Tires marked with arrows simply look more
dynamic..

"Off road, the rolling direction is far more important, as the tread
ensures optimumconnection between the tire and the ground. The rear
wheel transmits the driving force and the front wheel transmits the
braking and steering forces. Driving and braking forces operate in
different directions. That is why certain tires are fitted in opposite
rotating directions when used as front and rear tires.


I wouldn't listen to them. Last time I tired that the frame broke in
the middle.

"There are also treads without a specified rotating direction."




  #16  
Old Yesterday, 03:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,364
Default Serious Tire Questions for the uninitiated

On 4/12/2021 11:51 PM, Tosspot wrote:

snip

I wouldn't listen to them.* Last time I tired that the frame broke in
the middle.

Was it titanium, steel, aluminum, carbon fiber, or other? Be careful to
avoid mounting the tire in the wrong direction on a carbon fiber or
aluminum frame, but on the others there should be no frame breakage.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tire-making: questions and answers, but mostly questions DougC Techniques 6 November 9th 15 06:13 AM
Tire Questions... Riles Unicycling 3 January 11th 08 12:37 PM
tire compression questions. gordito8me Unicycling 9 November 12th 06 01:08 AM
Tire width questions JBAFromNY Techniques 9 August 21st 06 10:09 PM
Partial flat tire questions ... unisteve Unicycling 0 April 18th 06 06:24 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.