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Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick



 
 
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  #21  
Old January 21st 12, 03:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
kolldata
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Posts: 2,836
Default Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick

On Jan 20, 9:01*pm, Phil W Lee wrote:
"(PeteCresswell)" considered Fri, 20 Jan 2012 21:28:21
-0500 the perfect time to write:

Per (PeteCresswell):
I think I had one of those things for awhile when I was living in
Hawaii.


Some dealer got a bunch of them in from one of the UK countries.
I'm pretty sure they were police bikes. *That one introduced me
to the meaning of "English rust proofing: oil seals".


I retract my statement. * *Reading the web page, I see the brand
is "Greeves". * *Mine was a "Matchless". * Sure looked similar
though...


Same engine, so your statement is still applicable.
I suspect the lubrication system on those was best described as
"external splash" to borrow a term from LJK Setright.


ALSO 'TOTAL LOSS LUBRICATION'
is in that file
Ads
  #22  
Old January 21st 12, 06:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
Dan O
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Posts: 6,098
Default Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick

On Jan 20, 7:21 am, Anton Berlin wrote:
I am one of those nuts that has 10 machines in the garage. From a
custom made Columbus Max with SR an Aquila titanium with a brand new c-
record large flange group, to several carbon frames and a collection
of disc wheels and H3s etc.

I am in the stage where I want to simplify and feel that I could get
practical and get down to one bike and be content with that.


From inside my head, that sounds like you've lost interest (just a
sense from my own experience with other things - I could be wrong - no
offense).

My current idea is a titanium cyclocross style bike that uses mtb
wheels, has a long wheelbase and is set up for touring (fenders,
panniers, etc) would be the best compromise of all worlds.


You could do a lot with a bike like that, but compromise is
compromise.

I want a bike that is flexible enough to ride everyday, tour
extensively on (already have 2 cycling trips around the world and
multiple through Europe)


Returning to my earlier post, where I said I'd pick my Stumpjumper
(full-rigid), that is a bike that I can commute on, tour on, whjeelie,
etc., on and off road.

The open questions are rim brakes or discs ?


Doesn't matter too much as I fear it will end up sitting in the garage
while you pursue other interests.

Derailleurs or internal
gearing (rohloff or sram) ?


Internal gearing. If you've lost interest in bikes, you won't want to
be working on it.

And the pros and cons of using s&s couplers. Thanks in advance for
your thoughts and input.


Are you serious? A folder is a very narrow application for a very
specific purpose, and a humongous compromise.

If I'm wrong that you've lost interest, you might want to consider
paring it down to say two bikes - maybe three or four. That would
bring you close(r) to what you're proposing to do, with much less
compromise when you do ride.
  #23  
Old January 21st 12, 11:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
Tom Ace
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Posts: 391
Default Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick

On Jan 20, 6:22*pm, "(PeteCresswell)" wrote:
Per SMS:

Besides the cost and weight, the issue is that you really still need a
front derailleur with at least two chain rings.


Not for me - and I'm about as un-fit a dedicated cyclist as there
is. * I also climb some pretty steep hills.

14 gears is plenty for me and the range is more than adequate.

But it *is* heavy..... * -)


I second the point that the range is adequate, and I live where
there are mountains and my knees aren't up for abuse.

And I agree with Chalo that it works better than derailleurs.

And there's no dish.

And it is built to last.

In my case it adds about 0.5% to the total weight
of bike+rider compared to derailleur gearing.

Tom Ace
  #24  
Old January 21st 12, 11:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
Dave Lehnen[_2_]
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Posts: 45
Default Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick

SMS wrote:
On 1/20/2012 12:37 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Oh yeah, I almost forgot: it's heavy.


Besides the cost and weight, the issue is that you really still need a
front derailleur with at least two chain rings.

On one of my folders I have a Nexus Dual Drive 7 x 3 which works well
and is much lighter achieving a good gearing range with no front
derailleur and at low cost.


The Rohloff has 5.26:1 range. That's more range than a typical road
triple (53 - xx - 30) with a 12-34 cassette, which gives about a 5.01:1
range.

Dave Lehnen
  #25  
Old January 21st 12, 11:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
thirty-six
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Posts: 10,049
Default Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick

On Jan 20, 3:21*pm, Anton Berlin wrote:
*I am one of those nuts that has 10 machines in the garage. From a
custom made Columbus Max with SR an Aquila titanium with a brand new c-
record large flange group, to several carbon frames and a collection
of disc wheels and H3s etc.

I am in the stage where I want to simplify and feel that I could get
practical and get down to one bike and be content with that.

My current idea is a titanium cyclocross style bike that uses mtb
wheels, has a long wheelbase and is set up for touring (fenders,
panniers, etc) would be the best compromise of all worlds.

I want a bike that is flexible enough to ride everyday, tour
extensively on (already have 2 cycling trips around the world and
multiple through Europe)

The open questions are rim brakes or discs ? * Derailleurs or internal
gearing (rohloff or sram) ?

And the pros and cons of using s&s couplers. *Thanks in advance for
your thoughts and input.


Use something with a CI engine. There's some bikes meant for military
use, will run on just about anything resembling oil after rough
filtering.
  #26  
Old January 22nd 12, 01:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_3_]
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Posts: 1,365
Default Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick

Anton Berlin wrote:
... I want to simplify and feel that I could get
practical and get down to one bike and be content with that.

My current idea is a titanium cyclocross style bike that uses mtb
wheels, has a long wheelbase and is set up for touring (fenders,
panniers, etc) would be the best compromise of all worlds.

I want a bike that is flexible enough to ride everyday, tour
extensively on (already have 2 cycling trips around the world and
multiple through Europe)

The open questions are rim brakes or discs ? Derailleurs or internal
gearing (rohloff or sram) ?

And the pros and cons of using s&s couplers. Thanks in advance for
your thoughts and input.


It depends on your planned uses, of course. There are many styles of
cycling.

Titanium is fine. So are several other metals. A benefit of steel is
that it's easier to modify later, if necessary - adding brackets,
changing spacing, etc. If you don't see that happening, titanium is fine.

Cyclocross frames may feature high bottom brackets. If your frame has a
horizontal top tube, that may reduce standover height. You can decide
if that's a problem, depending on your use. For my road cycling, I
prefer touring geometry.

I've heard that mtb tires are more available, worldwide, than 700c. If
you plan on more super-remote riding, you may want to check out that
issue. For my riding, which is mostly on-road and more civilized (North
America & Europe), I like the greater selection in 700c road tires. You
can get them fat if you need to.

I'm not a disk brake fan. If I rode mostly off-road and/or did more
huge mountain descents, maybe I would be. But cantilevers are more
robust in that they are universally understood, parts are everywhere,
they work with any wheel, and they can be repaired on the road with your
multi-tool.

Rohloff vs. derailleurs? I like low-tech. I know Rohloffs "never"
break - but my derailleurs have almost never broken either. And I can
fix a derailleur.

I have friends with S&S couplers. They love them. Of course, they're
worthwhile only if you ship your bike often, e.g. as luggage. By
comparison, I've found packing a standard touring bike for air travel to
be a major hassle. For air travel, I prefer a folding bike, but I
probably wouldn't want it for an only bike.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #27  
Old January 22nd 12, 01:43 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
thirty-six
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Posts: 10,049
Default Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick

On Jan 22, 12:06*am, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
Anton Berlin wrote:
*... I want to simplify and feel that I could get
practical and get down to one bike and be content with that.


My current idea is a titanium cyclocross style bike that uses mtb
wheels, has a long wheelbase and is set up for touring (fenders,
panniers, etc) would be the best compromise of all worlds.


I want a bike that is flexible enough to ride everyday, tour
extensively on (already have 2 cycling trips around the world and
multiple through Europe)


The open questions are rim brakes or discs ? * Derailleurs or internal
gearing (rohloff or sram) ?


And the pros and cons of using s&s couplers. *Thanks in advance for
your thoughts and input.


It depends on your planned uses, of course. *There are many styles of
cycling.

Titanium is fine. *So are several other metals. *A benefit of steel is
that it's easier to modify later, if necessary - adding brackets,
changing spacing, etc. *If you don't see that happening, titanium is fine.


A benefit of magnesium is that with n appropriate scraper, the rider
has a godd firestarter for damp tinder/

Cyclocross frames may feature high bottom brackets.


They're mostly straight in UK I'm not sure though if there is an
equivalent riding under the influence of drink or drugs,
..

If your frame has a
horizontal top tube, that may reduce standover height. *You can decide
if that's a problem, depending on your use. *For my road cycling, I
prefer touring geometry.


You could use a milestone o lift it a bit , it's not as if you're
gonna want a go every hopur now, is it?

I've heard that mtb tires are more available, worldwide, than 700c. *If
you plan on more super-remote riding, you may want to check out that
issue. *For my riding, which is mostly on-road and more civilized (North
America & Europe), I like the greater selection in 700c road tires. *You
can get them fat if you need to.


I think I'm what's described as normal, t5he slimmer variety are snug
fit, fat ones may be termed gold.

I'm not a disk brake fan. *If I rode mostly off-road and/or did more


Take a screen, everyman has a videocam these days.

huge mountain descents, maybe I would be. *But cantilevers are more
robust in that they are universally understood, parts are everywhere,
they work with any wheel, and they can be repaired on the road with your
multi-tool.


Well, I've heard it called some things!

Rohloff vs. derailleurs? *I like low-tech. *I know Rohloffs "never"
break - but my derailleurs have almost never broken either. *And I can
fix a derailleur.


Yeah, stick with what you know.

I have friends with S&S couplers. *They love them. *Of course, they're


Sounds kinky, whatever it is.

worthwhile only if you ship your bike often, e.g. as luggage. *By
comparison, I've found packing a standard touring bike for air travel to
be a major hassle. *For air travel, I prefer a folding bike, but I
probably wouldn't want it for an only bike.

--
- Frank Krygowski


  #28  
Old January 22nd 12, 02:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
(PeteCresswell)
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Posts: 2,790
Default Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick

Per Frank Krygowski:
Cyclocross frames may feature high bottom brackets. If your frame has a
horizontal top tube, that may reduce standover height. You can decide
if that's a problem, depending on your use. For my road cycling, I
prefer touring geometry.


That's a significant tradeoff on my Salsa Fargo.

On one hand, I like the lower bottom bracket for stopping at
lights.

On the other hand, I have to remember not to take full pedal
strokes when crossing roots, curbs, and such.
--
Pete Cresswell
  #29  
Old January 22nd 12, 05:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech,rec.bicycles.misc
Lou Holtman[_7_]
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Posts: 628
Default Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick

Op 20-1-2012 16:21, Anton Berlin schreef:
I am one of those nuts that has 10 machines in the garage. From a
custom made Columbus Max with SR an Aquila titanium with a brand new c-
record large flange group, to several carbon frames and a collection
of disc wheels and H3s etc.

I am in the stage where I want to simplify and feel that I could get
practical and get down to one bike and be content with that.

My current idea is a titanium cyclocross style bike that uses mtb
wheels, has a long wheelbase and is set up for touring (fenders,
panniers, etc) would be the best compromise of all worlds.

I want a bike that is flexible enough to ride everyday, tour
extensively on (already have 2 cycling trips around the world and
multiple through Europe)

The open questions are rim brakes or discs ? Derailleurs or internal
gearing (rohloff or sram) ?

And the pros and cons of using s&s couplers. Thanks in advance for
your thoughts and input.


I'm not a big fan of the 'one fits all' concept. If you like different
styles of riding you make too much compromises. If someone held a gun to
my head and said that I only allowed one bike I have to think quickly:

- it should be suitable for fast road riding,
- it should have some off road capabilities,
- it should be able to carry some luggage,
- fenders would be nice,
- it should be nice to look at,
- it should be easy to maintain.

Dropbars are a must for me so a cyclecrossframe would be my choice. If
you are in touring than I a Rohloff hub is an option, but not for me. No
MTB wheels, 700c wheels for me. Mechanical disc brakes work with
brifters and gets rid of the rim wear.
Since I was very pleased with the result of my refurbishing project of
my 9 year old Ti roadbike, Ti would be my choice of frame material: no
paintjob, low maintenance and it stays like new forever:

https://picasaweb.google.com/101076538433373858645/OpknapbeurtLitespeedClassic

Hmm.... maybe a Ti version and with Campy brifters of my crossbike which
I picked up last week and fine tuned yesterday . It is ready to go:

https://picasaweb.google.com/101076538433373858645/Misc#5700494834216624434

but no way I limit myself to one bike. I would miss the montainbiking,
time trials and my low maintenance singlespeed winterriding.

Lou




  #30  
Old January 22nd 12, 06:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
LF
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Posts: 130
Default Getting down to 1 bike - what would you pick

If you want to leave your options open for touring in remote locations, I suspect derailleurs and rim brakes are easier to fix/ replace/ repair when they break at just the wrong time. In my experience, no parts are completely "bullet proof." What's been your experience?

Larry
 




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