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  #51  
Old November 29th 07, 07:00 AM posted to aus.bicycle
G-S
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Posts: 164
Default Simple bikes for local transport

brucef wrote:
On Nov 28, 4:39 pm, G-S wrote:
brucef wrote:
If you can come up with a simple bike like this, with maybe
3 or 5 hub gears for under $200 I will buy three.

So would I

If you can only keep it to around $400 I'd have to keep it to 1 though.


The price point is tricky. It falls somewhere between a kmart special
at about $150 and a low-end name brand bike with reasonable quality
parts, like a giant elwood or upland, which starts at about $400.


True, and whilst the Elwood isn't exciting or note worthy it actually
works pretty well for general pootling around, and can be adapted for
short/medium distance commuting pretty easily.

I reckon they would sell like crazy at $200, above $300 it gets a bit
dicey.


I have to agree...


G-S
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  #52  
Old November 30th 07, 10:15 PM posted to aus.bicycle
Peter Cremasco
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Posts: 15
Default Simple bikes for local transport

Graeme Dods wrote:
On Nov 28, 7:22 am, "Theo Bekkers" wrote:
I did have a steep hill which was on my route in, but I detoured around it
on the way home. So steep became long.


There's a steep hill in Perth! Where? Admittedly there are probably
huge bits of Perth I've not seen, but I've not come across anything
which I'd go out of my way to avoid on a single speed. My single speed
days were when I was younger and fitter but Edinburgh is rather well
known for being built on a bunch of hills.


Try Toowoomba. I've got a single speed, which used to be great for
commuting the 20 kms to work on the flatlands of Inglewood, but killed
me when I tried even a sedate cycle around the 'burbs here. Long live
multi-geared bikes.
  #53  
Old November 30th 07, 10:21 PM posted to aus.bicycle
Peter Cremasco
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Posts: 15
Default Simple bikes for local transport

Liz wrote:


I want one of these bikes when you get them! I'm currently riding my mum's
1950s(?) Malvern Star, and the brakes terrify me. I don't trust them to stop
at the bottom of a hill, so I find myself braking the whole way down the
hill. I'm sure there must be a better way. I'd also like a side stand (I
know, I could easily get one). I ride to the shops (about 1km) or short
rides with my toddler in a front-mounted child seat. It doesn't seem worth
spending $900 (what my previous bike cost) for that. Maybe when my
daughter's a bit older and can ride her own bike.


You'd be surprised what you can do with a $12 recycle-centre bike, with
proper brakes and spend $40 on hi pressure slicks. Been happily
commuting on that for a year or so now.
  #54  
Old December 3rd 07, 09:50 PM posted to aus.bicycle
BT Humble
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Posts: 655
Default Simple bikes for local transport

lemmiwinks wrote:
On Nov 28, 8:01 am, G-S wrote:
Resound wrote:


Centrestands are a thing that I can see being a distinct advantage
(especially for the bakfiet while trying to load and unload it).


You're right... I hate the sidestand on my cypress city with a passion.


It is easily the least practical bit of the bike, when I have weight in
the panniers the bike is very unstable.


I'll third that. My only caveat would be not to get those horrible
centrestands that swing from the rear axle like are common on Dutch
bikes, but rather the neat two legged type that attach just behind the
bottom bracket like a sidestand and the legs tuck up underneath the
chainstays.http://ebent.files.wordpress.com/200...mtriangles.jpg


Is it a midships-mounted sidestand by any chance? Aaargh has one of
those, and by the timewe got to Foster I went shopping for a rear
mounted one[1] because they work much better with panniers. $5 later
and I now have dual sidestands, which gives it a very secure 4-point-
of-contact stance. ;-)


BTH
[1] They either bolt to the rear of the left chainstay, or are held in
place by the left rear axle nut.
  #55  
Old December 4th 07, 07:02 AM posted to aus.bicycle
G-S
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Posts: 164
Default Simple bikes for local transport

BT Humble wrote:
lemmiwinks wrote:
On Nov 28, 8:01 am, G-S wrote:
Resound wrote:
Centrestands are a thing that I can see being a distinct advantage
(especially for the bakfiet while trying to load and unload it).
You're right... I hate the sidestand on my cypress city with a passion.
It is easily the least practical bit of the bike, when I have weight in
the panniers the bike is very unstable.

I'll third that. My only caveat would be not to get those horrible
centrestands that swing from the rear axle like are common on Dutch
bikes, but rather the neat two legged type that attach just behind the
bottom bracket like a sidestand and the legs tuck up underneath the
chainstays.http://ebent.files.wordpress.com/200...mtriangles.jpg


Is it a midships-mounted sidestand by any chance? Aaargh has one of
those, and by the timewe got to Foster I went shopping for a rear
mounted one[1] because they work much better with panniers. $5 later
and I now have dual sidestands, which gives it a very secure 4-point-
of-contact stance. ;-)


Yes it is a midships-mounted sidestand (and the bike fell off it today
for the 3rd time). Bit of a gust and *fall*.

BTH
[1] They either bolt to the rear of the left chainstay, or are held in
place by the left rear axle nut.


Might have to look into one ta BT.


G-S
  #56  
Old December 4th 07, 07:54 AM posted to aus.bicycle
BT Humble
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Posts: 655
Default Simple bikes for local transport

Zebee wrote:
G-S wrote:
[1] nor i suspect isBT'sK-Mart bike! [2]


[2] we're adult... really we are *convincing look* [3]


[3] I don't think Zebee is buying itBTH*sigh*


He has a shed full of c90s.

You have a sidecar. And of course a Guzzi.

THe prosecution rests m'lud


Are you somehow implying that I'm fashion-proof?


Not-quite-sure-if-he-should-be-offended BTH
  #57  
Old December 5th 07, 11:27 AM posted to aus.bicycle
dewatf
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Posts: 60
Default Simple bikes for local transport

On Mon, 26 Nov 2007 15:39:38 -0800 (PST), tim wrote:

I've dispaired at the cheap bike options available in Australia for
years. BTH's good experiences with his BigW bike are refreshing, but
the fact remains - ultra-cheap bikes are very low quality and
generally unsuitable for their target and actual use. It makes no
sense to fit knobby tyres on a bike with the generic "not for off-road
use" sticker, for example.


It's called a market and economies of scale. All the local kids are riding
to school in my area on $1500 downhill bikes with knobbly 2.5'' tyres
because they are cool. Of course they have to stand on the pedals to ride
along the flat at more than 5km/hr.

You can get a decent MTB for $500 and fit it out with slicks though.

dewatf.
 




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