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Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 18th 15, 08:37 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
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Default Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube

http://www.bikebiz.com/news/read/pro...er-tube/018702

I won't be rushing out to buy any.

--
JS
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  #2  
Old November 18th 15, 10:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 145
Default Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube

On Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at 12:37:42 PM UTC-8, James wrote:
http://www.bikebiz.com/news/read/pro...er-tube/018702

I won't be rushing out to buy any.


Nice and light. This will help MTB's because they are so damned heavy. But what are the other attributes of these tubes? Are they more difficult to puncture? And on a road bike on a fast descent the TIRE can heat almost to the point that rim brakes heat the rims to.

Disks are a bad idea on street bikes because they have low rolling resistance and disks ALWAYS drag some.

I have just finished my Ridley Xbow and was trying it out yesterday. I hadn't set the cantilever return springs tight enough to not touch the VERY slight wobble in the front rim. So while in the shop it all worked perfect - out on the trail it touched slightly.

When I got home after just 20 miles I was about to collapse. I sat down and it took 20 minutes before I could do anything. So this almost negligible drag of the disk shoes isn't anything to sneer at. And while you can set road rim brakes to never touch you can't do this with a disk. If they can't do it on cars they sure as heck aren't going to go it on bicycles. Remember that the shoe is separate from the piston and the rolling vibration will always have it touching. This is why disk shoes wear so rapidly.

Now because of the way they are designed with disk brakes counter actuating on a solid surface vs. rim brakes actuating against a flexible rim, disk brakes have FAR superior stopping power if you don't melt aluminum disks into a puddle. But it will remain to be seen if the stopping power makes up for the increases rolling resistance.
  #3  
Old November 18th 15, 10:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
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Default Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube


Disks are a bad idea on street bikes because they have low rolling resistance


Disk brakes have rolling resistance?



  #4  
Old November 18th 15, 11:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Default Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube

On 2015-11-18 14:15, wrote:
On Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at 12:37:42 PM UTC-8, James wrote:
http://www.bikebiz.com/news/read/pro...er-tube/018702



I won't be rushing out to buy any.


Same here :-)


Nice and light. This will help MTB's because they are so damned
heavy.



Heavy = better. Ever since I equipped my road bike with tube of 0.120"
wall thickness (about 3mm) there were no more flats. It's been over a
year now. On the MTB the tubes are a bit thicker, 0.160" or 4mm.


... But what are the other attributes of these tubes? Are they
more difficult to puncture? And on a road bike on a fast descent the
TIRE can heat almost to the point that rim brakes heat the rims to.

Disks are a bad idea on street bikes because they have low rolling
resistance and disks ALWAYS drag some.


What sort of disk brakes have you tried? Mine are Promax Decipher and
like many others they have U-shaped spring clips which keep the pads and
pistons away from the disk when not braking. When the calipers are
adjusted correctly there is no drag whatsoever. It's that silver
thingamagic in the pictu

http://www.promaxcomponents.com/wp-c...b2up4itsg0.jpg

In case Clive reads this: These low-end Promax hydraulic brakes are a
perfect example that bicycle gear can be made durable without Rolls
Royce pricing.


I have just finished my Ridley Xbow and was trying it out yesterday.
I hadn't set the cantilever return springs tight enough to not touch
the VERY slight wobble in the front rim. So while in the shop it all
worked perfect - out on the trail it touched slightly.

When I got home after just 20 miles I was about to collapse. I sat
down and it took 20 minutes before I could do anything. So this
almost negligible drag of the disk shoes isn't anything to sneer at.
And while you can set road rim brakes to never touch you can't do
this with a disk. If they can't do it on cars they sure as heck
aren't going to go it on bicycles. Remember that the shoe is separate
from the piston and the rolling vibration will always have it
touching. This is why disk shoes wear so rapidly.


Huh? The brake pads on my car are barely half worn down and its been
77000 miles now. On cars they do drag a little (very little) but
generally not on bicycle disk brakes.


Now because of the way they are designed with disk brakes counter
actuating on a solid surface vs. rim brakes actuating against a
flexible rim, disk brakes have FAR superior stopping power if you
don't melt aluminum disks into a puddle.



Ummm ... they are made from steel.


... But it will remain to be
seen if the stopping power makes up for the increases rolling
resistance.


What rolling resistance? The only time I feel any on my MTB is when
those dreaded holes in the disks have caught enough vegetation and the
poker of the Swiss Army knife has to come out for a trailside cleaning job.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #5  
Old November 19th 15, 12:02 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Default Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube

On Wed, 18 Nov 2015 14:36:45 -0800 (PST), Doug Landau
wrote:


Disks are a bad idea on street bikes because they have low rolling resistance


Disk brakes have rolling resistance?


But don't worry as the original poster stipulated that they have "low"
rolling resistance :-)
--

Cheers,

John B.
  #6  
Old November 19th 15, 04:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ralph Barone[_3_]
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Default Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube

James wrote:
http://www.bikebiz.com/news/read/pro...er-tube/018702

I won't be rushing out to buy any.


"Not available for bikes with rim brakes". Because the heat from rim
brakes could melt it? That doesn't sound like a step forwards.

  #7  
Old November 20th 15, 03:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Default Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube

On 11/19/2015 9:31 PM, Phil W Lee wrote:
Doug Landau considered Wed, 18 Nov 2015
14:36:45 -0800 (PST) the perfect time to write:


Disks are a bad idea on street bikes because they have low rolling resistance


Disk brakes have rolling resistance?

In use, yes.
It's kinda the point

There's no reason that a properly aligned and adjusted disk caliper
should drag any more than a properly aligned and adjusted rim caliper
when released.


I've never owned a disk brake bike, but I've ridden several that
belonged to others. Some definitely made scraping sounds with the brake
off. One tourist who had ridden 60 miles that day to get to my house
assured me that the scraping was "normal."

I can't say how much drag it imposed; my ride was a short one, testing
an unrelated repair I made for him. But I know the scraping would have
driven me nuts.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #8  
Old November 20th 15, 03:33 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Clive George
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Posts: 5,394
Default Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube

On 20/11/2015 03:15, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/19/2015 9:31 PM, Phil W Lee wrote:
Doug Landau considered Wed, 18 Nov 2015
14:36:45 -0800 (PST) the perfect time to write:


Disks are a bad idea on street bikes because they have low rolling
resistance

Disk brakes have rolling resistance?

In use, yes.
It's kinda the point

There's no reason that a properly aligned and adjusted disk caliper
should drag any more than a properly aligned and adjusted rim caliper
when released.


I've never owned a disk brake bike, but I've ridden several that
belonged to others. Some definitely made scraping sounds with the brake
off. One tourist who had ridden 60 miles that day to get to my house
assured me that the scraping was "normal."

I can't say how much drag it imposed; my ride was a short one, testing
an unrelated repair I made for him. But I know the scraping would have
driven me nuts.


Knobblies hide the sound :-)

Ours sometimes seem to scrape - but spinning the wheel shows it's not
actually dragging. I think the scraping goes away after a short while
anyway - I certainly don't remember being bothered by it.

  #9  
Old November 20th 15, 10:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 6,374
Default Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube

UCI UCI ?

If ura PIG in TSD ...

gotta be a LARGE problem investing. $$$$$ only to wait on a 'deliberative body'

****...my Redline XC on Schwinebees is so heavy it doesn't fall off a cliff.

Poly hulled kayaks are HEAVY but wear and impact fracture tolerant...flex not Crac
yet no horn blowing here...nada

Cheap compared with glass...no hand work..19 pounds ?

19 POUNDS ?

will UCI yield ?

  #10  
Old November 20th 15, 10:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 3,967
Default Actual bike tech alert: New inner tube

On Fri, 20 Nov 2015 02:31:32 +0000, Phil W Lee
wrote:

Doug Landau considered Wed, 18 Nov 2015
14:36:45 -0800 (PST) the perfect time to write:


Disks are a bad idea on street bikes because they have low rolling resistance


Disk brakes have rolling resistance?

In use, yes.
It's kinda the point

There's no reason that a properly aligned and adjusted disk caliper
should drag any more than a properly aligned and adjusted rim caliper
when released.


I can only comment on the one disk brake that I've actually,
personally, examined and it certainly "dragged", or at lest made a
rubbing noise when you rode the bike. The owner said that it had,
"always done that."
--

Cheers,

John B.
 




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