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Offer.... New derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 18th 19, 09:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 152
Default Offer.... New derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain

What do you think of this offer?

Your chain has arrived.

I want to offer you a great solution and price and just plan on changing your rear derailleur and shifters (and chain) which I think will make life MUCH nicer for you. I can order the parts for Tuesday delivery and change them out for you on Wednesday while you wait.

The issue with your bike is a lot of wear and tear and not being 100% sure of which part is truly the shifting issue. The new derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain would be right at about $60 (labor included).

It's 50% off normal price but think it would make a world of difference for you. If you want me to order what you need, I can go ahead...just let me know.

Ads
  #2  
Old August 18th 19, 09:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ashevilliot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default Offer.... New derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain

On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 4:51:02 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
What do you think of this offer?

Your chain has arrived.

I want to offer you a great solution and price and just plan on changing your rear derailleur and shifters (and chain) which I think will make life MUCH nicer for you. I can order the parts for Tuesday delivery and change them out for you on Wednesday while you wait.

The issue with your bike is a lot of wear and tear and not being 100% sure of which part is truly the shifting issue. The new derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain would be right at about $60 (labor included).

It's 50% off normal price but think it would make a world of difference for you. If you want me to order what you need, I can go ahead...just let me know.


If you trust the shop, go for it.
  #3  
Old August 18th 19, 11:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 152
Default Offer.... New derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain

On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 3:56:38 PM UTC-5, Ashevilliot wrote:
On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 4:51:02 PM UTC-4, AK wrote:
What do you think of this offer?

Your chain has arrived.

I want to offer you a great solution and price and just plan on changing your rear derailleur and shifters (and chain) which I think will make life MUCH nicer for you. I can order the parts for Tuesday delivery and change them out for you on Wednesday while you wait.

The issue with your bike is a lot of wear and tear and not being 100% sure of which part is truly the shifting issue. The new derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain would be right at about $60 (labor included).

It's 50% off normal price but think it would make a world of difference for you. If you want me to order what you need, I can go ahead...just let me know.


If you trust the shop, go for it.


thanks, I have done business there before.

Andy
  #4  
Old August 19th 19, 12:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,095
Default Offer.... New derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 13:51:01 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

What do you think of this offer?


Ask what the "Normal Price" is and what maker and model components you
will be getting for the unspecified amount. If the shop is supplying
name brand components with a good reputation for quality at a
reasonable price, go for it. If it's some unknown and no-name brand
of components, perhaps it's not a good idea at any price. In other
words, get a real written estimate on the cost of the components plus
the labor.

There are also some details to consider:
1. Is there a warranty on the work?
2. What happens if the shifting problem is present with the new
hardware?
3. If you are planning to learn something about bicycle mechanics
from this exercise, it's not going to happen by having the LBS do all
the work. Buy the components and do it yourself. If you screw it up,
you can always go back to the LBS and have them do the necessary
adjustments.
--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #5  
Old August 19th 19, 01:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 152
Default Offer.... New derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain

On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 6:37:19 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 13:51:01 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

What do you think of this offer?


Ask what the "Normal Price" is and what maker and model components you
will be getting for the unspecified amount. If the shop is supplying
name brand components with a good reputation for quality at a
reasonable price, go for it. If it's some unknown and no-name brand
of components, perhaps it's not a good idea at any price. In other
words, get a real written estimate on the cost of the components plus
the labor.

There are also some details to consider:
1. Is there a warranty on the work?
2. What happens if the shifting problem is present with the new
hardware?
3. If you are planning to learn something about bicycle mechanics
from this exercise, it's not going to happen by having the LBS do all
the work. Buy the components and do it yourself. If you screw it up,
you can always go back to the LBS and have them do the necessary
adjustments.
--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


You gave me some things to consider.

Much of what needs to be done is completely new to me.

The parts alone are close to $60.

I like learning and have watched him make other repairs and learned from it.

There are plenty of bike repair videos, but some things do not go smoothly when done the first time.

Andy
  #6  
Old August 19th 19, 03:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,095
Default Offer.... New derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 17:34:27 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 6:37:19 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 13:51:01 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

What do you think of this offer?


Ask what the "Normal Price" is and what maker and model components you
will be getting for the unspecified amount. If the shop is supplying
name brand components with a good reputation for quality at a
reasonable price, go for it. If it's some unknown and no-name brand
of components, perhaps it's not a good idea at any price. In other
words, get a real written estimate on the cost of the components plus
the labor.

There are also some details to consider:
1. Is there a warranty on the work?
2. What happens if the shifting problem is present with the new
hardware?
3. If you are planning to learn something about bicycle mechanics
from this exercise, it's not going to happen by having the LBS do all
the work. Buy the components and do it yourself. If you screw it up,
you can always go back to the LBS and have them do the necessary
adjustments.


You gave me some things to consider.
The parts alone are close to $60.


That was the general idea. 50% off of full list price might not be
such a great deal if the list price is inflated and if everyone in
town is selling the groupset for the discounted price. I suggest you
get a better estimate of what this will cost you.

Much of what needs to be done is completely new to me.
I like learning and have watched him make other repairs and learned from it.


Notice that my domain is "Learn by Destroying". You really don't
understand how something works until you accidentally break it, and
are then forced to fix it yourself. You learn much more about how
something works with hands on experience and desperation, than by
observation. Mimicking what the expert mechanic will get the bicycle
fixed much faster than trial and error or learn by destroying, but
even will not show you how things work. To fix a shifting problem,
you should put the bicycle up on a stand, and watch the components
closely while you shift up and down the gears. Look for something
that isn't right, like a bad chain line, failure of the chain to mesh
with the gears (usually caused by worn gears and/or worn chain), or
simple things like the wrong chain length. Compare how your bicycle
shifts with another bicycle that is known to work. If you have a slow
motion feature on a smartphone or digital camera, use it to get a
closer and slower look at the action.

Since this is all new to you, I suggest you dive into the works of the
great Sheldon Brown:
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/bicycleGears.html
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/repairs.html
https://www.sheldonbrown.com
and read about your particular area of interest. Don't worry if you
don't understand everything. I don't think any of the participants in
this newsgroup know everything on Sheldon's web pages. If you're
stuck, ask SPECIFIC questions here or in other forums.

Be prepared to make some mistakes. That's what learn by destroying
really means. I you haven't broken (or destroyed) it, and then fixed
it, you don't understand it. You can't learn bicycle repair by
watching someone else do it. You have to get your hands dirty and do
it yourself. However, when you're done, you really understand it.

If you're into the technology and science, as your email address
suggests, there are some books worth reading:
Bicycling Science 3rd edition by David Gordon Wilson:
https://www.alibris.com/Bicycling-Science-David-Gordon-Wilson/book/17828968
Published in 2004, it's a bit dated after 15 years, but most of the
content is still very applicable. You won't find anything on 27 speed
gearing, fixies, carbon fiber, mountain bike suspensions, and eBikes,
but everything else should be there.

There are plenty of bike repair videos, but some things do not
go smoothly when done the first time.


You're being overly optimistic. NOTHING goes smoothly the first time
you try it. When I work on something new, everything takes 5 times
too long, things blow up, things happen that I don't understand, and I
usually have to start over at least once. The 2nd time, things go
faster and better. After a few more attempts, and after I gain
confidence and experience, things go quickly and smoothly. If you're
into Zen, "one must suffer before enlightenment".

The YouTube bicycle repair videos are very useful. However, due to
the video time constraint, they move along much quicker than reality.
The video may show a groupset transplant and adjustment in 10 minutes,
while in real time, it takes up to an hour or more. Don't be
disappointed if you're not quick and/or instantly proficient after
watching a few videos. Don't be disappointed if you have to tear it
all apart, and start over from scratch. Don't worry about breaking
something. It happens. When adjusting the derailleurs, don't be
surprised if you don't get it right the first time. If you're stuck,
don't bang your head against the wall. Just ask someone who knows.

Good luck and may your learning experience be less painful than mine
was.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #7  
Old August 19th 19, 05:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,174
Default Offer.... New derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain

On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 7:43:01 PM UTC-7, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 17:34:27 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 6:37:19 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 13:51:01 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

What do you think of this offer?

Ask what the "Normal Price" is and what maker and model components you
will be getting for the unspecified amount. If the shop is supplying
name brand components with a good reputation for quality at a
reasonable price, go for it. If it's some unknown and no-name brand
of components, perhaps it's not a good idea at any price. In other
words, get a real written estimate on the cost of the components plus
the labor.

There are also some details to consider:
1. Is there a warranty on the work?
2. What happens if the shifting problem is present with the new
hardware?
3. If you are planning to learn something about bicycle mechanics
from this exercise, it's not going to happen by having the LBS do all
the work. Buy the components and do it yourself. If you screw it up,
you can always go back to the LBS and have them do the necessary
adjustments.


You gave me some things to consider.
The parts alone are close to $60.


That was the general idea. 50% off of full list price might not be
such a great deal if the list price is inflated and if everyone in
town is selling the groupset for the discounted price. I suggest you
get a better estimate of what this will cost you.

Much of what needs to be done is completely new to me.
I like learning and have watched him make other repairs and learned from it.


Notice that my domain is "Learn by Destroying". You really don't
understand how something works until you accidentally break it, and
are then forced to fix it yourself. You learn much more about how
something works with hands on experience and desperation, than by
observation. Mimicking what the expert mechanic will get the bicycle
fixed much faster than trial and error or learn by destroying, but
even will not show you how things work. To fix a shifting problem,
you should put the bicycle up on a stand, and watch the components
closely while you shift up and down the gears. Look for something
that isn't right, like a bad chain line, failure of the chain to mesh
with the gears (usually caused by worn gears and/or worn chain), or
simple things like the wrong chain length. Compare how your bicycle
shifts with another bicycle that is known to work. If you have a slow
motion feature on a smartphone or digital camera, use it to get a
closer and slower look at the action.

Since this is all new to you, I suggest you dive into the works of the
great Sheldon Brown:
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/bicycleGears.html
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/repairs.html
https://www.sheldonbrown.com
and read about your particular area of interest. Don't worry if you
don't understand everything. I don't think any of the participants in
this newsgroup know everything on Sheldon's web pages. If you're
stuck, ask SPECIFIC questions here or in other forums.

Be prepared to make some mistakes. That's what learn by destroying
really means. I you haven't broken (or destroyed) it, and then fixed
it, you don't understand it. You can't learn bicycle repair by
watching someone else do it. You have to get your hands dirty and do
it yourself. However, when you're done, you really understand it.

If you're into the technology and science, as your email address
suggests, there are some books worth reading:
Bicycling Science 3rd edition by David Gordon Wilson:
https://www.alibris.com/Bicycling-Science-David-Gordon-Wilson/book/17828968
Published in 2004, it's a bit dated after 15 years, but most of the
content is still very applicable. You won't find anything on 27 speed
gearing, fixies, carbon fiber, mountain bike suspensions, and eBikes,
but everything else should be there.

There are plenty of bike repair videos, but some things do not
go smoothly when done the first time.


You're being overly optimistic. NOTHING goes smoothly the first time
you try it. When I work on something new, everything takes 5 times
too long, things blow up, things happen that I don't understand, and I
usually have to start over at least once. The 2nd time, things go
faster and better. After a few more attempts, and after I gain
confidence and experience, things go quickly and smoothly. If you're
into Zen, "one must suffer before enlightenment".

The YouTube bicycle repair videos are very useful. However, due to
the video time constraint, they move along much quicker than reality.
The video may show a groupset transplant and adjustment in 10 minutes,
while in real time, it takes up to an hour or more. Don't be
disappointed if you're not quick and/or instantly proficient after
watching a few videos. Don't be disappointed if you have to tear it
all apart, and start over from scratch. Don't worry about breaking
something. It happens. When adjusting the derailleurs, don't be
surprised if you don't get it right the first time. If you're stuck,
don't bang your head against the wall. Just ask someone who knows.

Good luck and may your learning experience be less painful than mine
was.


Gads, in the era of YouTube, there are no mysteries -- although every time I try to find the repair video for my particular two-stroke yard-whacking-thing by brand and model, the only relevant video is usually shot by some drunk home-mechanic with a smart phone and DTs in a dark room. Things swish and swoosh by . . . was that the carb? . . . where does that gasket go?

-- Jay Beattie.
  #8  
Old August 19th 19, 06:32 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,095
Default Offer.... New derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain

On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 21:12:56 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

Gads, in the era of YouTube, there are no mysteries -- although every time
I try to find the repair video for my particular
two-stroke yard-whacking-thing by brand and model, the only relevant video
is usually shot by some drunk home-mechanic with a smart phone and DTs in
a dark room. Things swish and swoosh by . . . was that the carb? . . .
where does that gasket go?


Of course. Such videos were not designed for you or me. They were
designed to be viewed by drunken home mechanics with DT's. Most
amateur cinematographers do not have the equipment, talent, or time to
create a proper video. The results, as you describe, are predictable.
Looking through the user comments, the typical viewer is not much
better than the drunken amateur cinematographer.

I watch far too many YouTube videos. While the production quality of
the amateur videos are generally awful, the information and content
are often superior to professionally made videos, which tend to
emphasize entertainment value over information and content. If the
video is difficult to see, otto focus, garbled audio, shaky camera,
etc, it is often worth the time and effort to single step through
videos to extract the necessary details. If you use a browser to
watch YouTube, there are fast-forward and rewind extension to make
this easier:
https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/controls-for-youtube/doocmbmlcnbbdohogchldhlikjpndpng
https://chrome.google.com/webstore/d...nlijacdniggpjn.


YouTube Statistics - 2019
https://biographon.com/youtube-stats/
Got some spare kids? Put them to work:
The youngest YouTube star Ryan ToysReview who is 6 years old
made $11,000,000 in 2017.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #9  
Old August 22nd 19, 03:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 152
Default Offer.... New derailleur, shifters, handlebar grips, cables and chain

On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 9:43:01 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 17:34:27 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

On Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 6:37:19 PM UTC-5, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Sun, 18 Aug 2019 13:51:01 -0700 (PDT), AK
wrote:

What do you think of this offer?

Ask what the "Normal Price" is and what maker and model components you
will be getting for the unspecified amount. If the shop is supplying
name brand components with a good reputation for quality at a
reasonable price, go for it. If it's some unknown and no-name brand
of components, perhaps it's not a good idea at any price. In other
words, get a real written estimate on the cost of the components plus
the labor.

There are also some details to consider:
1. Is there a warranty on the work?
2. What happens if the shifting problem is present with the new
hardware?
3. If you are planning to learn something about bicycle mechanics
from this exercise, it's not going to happen by having the LBS do all
the work. Buy the components and do it yourself. If you screw it up,
you can always go back to the LBS and have them do the necessary
adjustments.


You gave me some things to consider.
The parts alone are close to $60.


That was the general idea. 50% off of full list price might not be
such a great deal if the list price is inflated and if everyone in
town is selling the groupset for the discounted price. I suggest you
get a better estimate of what this will cost you.

Much of what needs to be done is completely new to me.
I like learning and have watched him make other repairs and learned from it.


Notice that my domain is "Learn by Destroying". You really don't
understand how something works until you accidentally break it, and
are then forced to fix it yourself. You learn much more about how
something works with hands on experience and desperation, than by
observation. Mimicking what the expert mechanic will get the bicycle
fixed much faster than trial and error or learn by destroying, but
even will not show you how things work. To fix a shifting problem,
you should put the bicycle up on a stand, and watch the components
closely while you shift up and down the gears. Look for something
that isn't right, like a bad chain line, failure of the chain to mesh
with the gears (usually caused by worn gears and/or worn chain), or
simple things like the wrong chain length. Compare how your bicycle
shifts with another bicycle that is known to work. If you have a slow
motion feature on a smartphone or digital camera, use it to get a
closer and slower look at the action.

Since this is all new to you, I suggest you dive into the works of the
great Sheldon Brown:
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/bicycleGears.html
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/repairs.html
https://www.sheldonbrown.com
and read about your particular area of interest. Don't worry if you
don't understand everything. I don't think any of the participants in
this newsgroup know everything on Sheldon's web pages. If you're
stuck, ask SPECIFIC questions here or in other forums.

Be prepared to make some mistakes. That's what learn by destroying
really means. I you haven't broken (or destroyed) it, and then fixed
it, you don't understand it. You can't learn bicycle repair by
watching someone else do it. You have to get your hands dirty and do
it yourself. However, when you're done, you really understand it.

If you're into the technology and science, as your email address
suggests, there are some books worth reading:
Bicycling Science 3rd edition by David Gordon Wilson:



You're being overly optimistic. NOTHING goes smoothly the first time
you try it. When I work on something new, everything takes 5 times
too long, things blow up, things happen that I don't understand, and I

Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


Looks like you have had a lot of bad luck but the impt thing is you learned from it.

Many things I have done for the first time have gone very smoothly.

Andy
 




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