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Handebar broke off - nasty cash



 
 
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  #41  
Old August 6th 19, 03:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,821
Default Handebar broke off - nasty cash

On 2019-08-06 00:55, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 05 Aug 2019 13:55:13 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2019-08-05 13:36, Tom Kunich wrote:


[...]


Nothing is permanent in this world so I got used to it.


However, one should seek the more permanent stuff versus the less than
permanent stuff. It's like with cars. Japanese ones are among the best
but even they break down. My wife's Toyota developed a steering rack
leak afer 23 years. Unbelievable. Only 23 years. $940 later it's all
fixed. At least it didn't fail on the road, just very gradually. My
Mitsubishi is 22 years and, nada. Not even a dome light has had the
audacity to burn out. I sure wish bicycle manufacturers would learn
about that level of quality.


I see a 2020 Mitsubishi Eclipse, weighing in the neighborhood of 3500
lbs.and costing US$ 24,085. I suggest that anyone selling bicycles
built to those standards probably make a "live for ever" bicycle.



That Mitsubishi can comfortably carry four people, baggae and if needed
a small trailer. Mine (Montero Sport) can carry half a ton of firewood,
and has, many times.

A bicycle only needs to carry ne rider and modest baggage. How much
effort and weight would it have taken to coat the steel stiffener tube
before pressing it in? 0.01oz? 0.02oz?

Yes, they could do better.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
Ads
  #42  
Old August 6th 19, 03:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,821
Default Crashing and Aging

On 2019-08-05 21:55, Andre Jute wrote:
On Tuesday, August 6, 2019 at 2:10:34 AM UTC+1, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 8:41:29 PM UTC-4, Andre Jute wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 9:29:26 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 1:33:00 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute
wrote:

Somebody on my ride was saying only the other day that
crashes at our age are so much more consequential. Though
they were talking about breaking a hip, I thought of that
when a couple of days later I fell while dismounting from my
bike (I hooked the mixte bar between my foot and its heel)
and landed so heavily that the deep dent in my helmet looks
like the most dangerous accident I've had in 30 years of
cycling -- from a standstill! The helmet saved me from a gash
on the head, painful stitches, and perhaps even a concussion.
That's definitely worth its price.

Andre Jute Not an old crock

Modern safety helmets reduce concussions not by softening the
blow via cushioning with the Styrofoam but by fracturing and
breaking via the "vent" holes in the helmet. I have a Bontrager
Wavecell helmet and it has a lot less vents for two reasons -
1. Unlike Styrofoam air passes rather freely though the open
core material and 2. you have to have the Wavecell material
covering most of your head to have the expected effect.

So my helmet isn't wrecked by the impact-dent?

Separate question. That helmet is actually pretty old, being on
its third bike. Is there a natural raging process (embrittling?)
of helmet materials that requires helmets to be replaced after x
time?

Andre Jute


I think that aging of the foam in a helmet depends on t he foam
material itself plus incidentals such as exposure to sunlight
(UVA/UVB rays)bumps it has suffered and even exposure to sweat. I
have an old hard-shell Vetta helmet here that appears to be in mint
condition. I guess it'd take a microscopic examination of the
underlying foam section to tell if the foam has deteriorated.

Manufacturers like to sell helmets and also protect themselves from
litigation and thus many helmet manufacturers tell customers to
replace the helmet every five years or some other number of years
and also to replace the helmet if it has suffered a hard knock or
fall.

Cheers


Thanks, Ridealot. I'll inspect the outside shell under a strong
light and magnification for cracks. None are visible with the naked
eye.


In the UK that may not be such a big deal but here in sunny California I
had to retire a helmet because the UV content of the sun light started
to embrittle the shell. It was only about three years old.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #43  
Old August 6th 19, 03:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,488
Default Handebar broke off - nasty cash

On Tuesday, August 6, 2019 at 10:45:23 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-05 16:28, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 6:22:32 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-05 15:10, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 4:55:14 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-05 13:36, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 1:03:30 PM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:

Yes and no. I've broken steel pedal spindles catastrophically.
Spokes go all at once. Steel fasteners snap -- axles, too. Lots of
steel things will snap, including bars after enough high energy
fatigue cycles.

-- Jay Beattie.


Cast steel will fail suddenly but with any kind of pipe structure that's
rare.


I broke a Look steel pedal spindle on a couple of occasions. Had
steel saddle rails break off and steel spokes break in one swell
foop. I have seen steel bicycle frames fail suddenly and steel bars
suddenly bend upon hitting a pothole.


A pothole can be like an accident, like hitting an object.


Nothing is permanent in this world so I got used to it.


However, one should seek the more permanent stuff versus the less than
permanent stuff. It's like with cars. Japanese ones are among the best
but even they break down. My wife's Toyota developed a steering rack
leak afer 23 years. Unbelievable. Only 23 years. $940 later it's all
fixed. At least it didn't fail on the road, just very gradually. My
Mitsubishi is 22 years and, nada. Not even a dome light has had the
audacity to burn out. I sure wish bicycle manufacturers would learn
about that level of quality.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Maybe you should use the tires and other components these guys use?


Well, I do have an MTB steel handlebar on the road bike now. Also MTB
pedals (for years).


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_IFoSKTl1Y

I'm sure the trails in your area are not as knarly as whatthese guys are riding over.


That's steep but not gnarly at all. Gnarly to me means full of ruts, big
rocks and stuff. Things where you can get really hurt in a crash. Here
is one of our trails and that is gnarly:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y38JzV-ueXI

People have died on that one. Went off the cliff edge which doesn't look
dangerous but the grease brush doesn't hold anyhting and afterwards it's
an almost vertical fall (onto rocks).

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Did you watch the ENTIRE video?


Yes.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Well then you must have seen them riding over rock strewn sections of trails, jumping over some sections and landing on rocks and doing all t hat whilst riding a high rate of speed. Looking at the two videos your clip does NOT compare at all to the route those guys took in the video I posted the link to.

Cheers
  #44  
Old August 6th 19, 06:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,592
Default Handebar broke off - nasty cash

On 8/5/2019 4:20 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, August 4, 2019 at 5:16:31 PM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, August 4, 2019 at 5:09:13 PM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/4/2019 10:14 AM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, August 3, 2019 at 11:31:40 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
Folks,

Had a nasty crash about three months ago. Long story short my handlebar
broke without any warning. There was no cause such as a speed bump or
pothole.

http://analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Handlebar1.jpg

The handlebar was not cheap, an ITM Mondial. It seems they botched the
design in that they used a non-coated steel stiffener tube in the
center. This corroded the aluminum from the inside out, interestingly in
riding direction. Possibly because that's where the headwinds are
hitting it and maybe cause condensation:

http://analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Handlebar1.jpg

Luckily it didn't happen 1/2h earlier where I was coming down a steep
hill at more than 40mph, with a rocky drainage ditch. It happened at a
leisurely travel speed of 15-17mph. Thanks to the fact that it was a
very wide bike lane I had space to roll and at the end I skidded to
avoid traffic. In the lane I'd have crashed into the path of vehicles.
About the only body part that wasn't hurt was my head, thanks to the helmet.

http://analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Helmet1.jpg

I am back in the saddle. I no longer trust aluminum and certainly not
any kind of plastic stuff so the road bike now has a flat steel MTB
handlebar. Put MeetLocks ergo handles on it, rides nicely.

As a side note I cycled by the crash site a week ago. I still saw the
scrape marks on the asphalt and debris from my bike which I cleaned up.
Interestingly all the blood was gone. Maybe a wild animal has licked it
clean.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Very sorry to hear of your injuries Joerg. Let me again mention a product called Second Skin that does a remarkable job of speeding healing and reducing pain.

Also again, Trek through Bontrager is presently making a helmet called "Wavecell" where the padding, instead of Styrofoam is a three-D printed padding. The original documentation stated that it provided 28 times more protection against concussion but the latest documentation now says 48 times. Being printed it is easily changed so perhaps that wasn't a writing error but actual improvement. A helmet cannot save your life, but it could make your life a whole lot easier if you avoid a serious concussion like I had.

I have looked at tests of aluminum and carbon fiber bars. Properly constructed, the carbon fiber bar has almost infinite fatigue resistance whereas an aluminum bar does not. Strangely enough a steel bar is even less if it is stressed in the fatigue zone. The problem is that usually steel or aluminum will bend in a collision whereas carbon fiber will break.

Watch yourself. We can do without losing members of this group that have good sense. We're so few.


In theory, in a perfect world, full of perfect (not human)
beings, sure.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=carbon+han...es&ia=ima ges

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Steel handlebars do me fine. I really fail to see that there's a problem with steel handlebars that glass threads in a resin matrix solves.

Andre Jute
Of course there is a place for useless premium-price products. Just don't expect me to buy them.


If you have the effective mass of a steel handlebar in carbon fiber you would have better reliability. It's just that CF is used to get less mass.


+1

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #45  
Old August 6th 19, 06:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,592
Default Handebar broke off - nasty cash

On 8/5/2019 4:03 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 9:54:04 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-04 22:37, James wrote:
On 4/8/19 4:31 am, Joerg wrote:
Folks,

Had a nasty crash about three months ago. Long story short my
handlebar broke without any warning. There was no cause such as a
speed bump or pothole.

http://analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Handlebar1.jpg

The handlebar was not cheap, an ITM Mondial. It seems they botched the
design in that they used a non-coated steel stiffener tube in the
center. This corroded the aluminum from the inside out, interestingly
in riding direction. Possibly because that's where the headwinds are
hitting it and maybe cause condensation:

http://analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Handlebar1.jpg

Luckily it didn't happen 1/2h earlier where I was coming down a steep
hill at more than 40mph, with a rocky drainage ditch. It happened at a
leisurely travel speed of 15-17mph. Thanks to the fact that it was a
very wide bike lane I had space to roll and at the end I skidded to
avoid traffic. In the lane I'd have crashed into the path of vehicles.
About the only body part that wasn't hurt was my head, thanks to the
helmet.

http://analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Helmet1.jpg

I am back in the saddle. I no longer trust aluminum and certainly not
any kind of plastic stuff so the road bike now has a flat steel MTB
handlebar. Put MeetLocks ergo handles on it, rides nicely.

As a side note I cycled by the crash site a week ago. I still saw the
scrape marks on the asphalt and debris from my bike which I cleaned
up. Interestingly all the blood was gone. Maybe a wild animal has
licked it clean.


Glad you're ok, Joerg.

I broke a steel steerer once, and in a separate incident a steel BB
axle. Both broke without any warning. Thankfully I didn't crash either
time. Oh, I've also broken a few steel axles and my wife broke a steel
bicycle chain.


My dad once broke a steel frame, bike separated into halves. That
resulted in some road rash.


Having also broken aluminium handle bars, a rim or two and a pedal, that
I remember, I'm at a loss to know what is safe to use.


I think steel is still the safest bet. There is a reason why most
hardcore bikepackers will not use anything other than a steel frame.


Though I've heard lots of stories about broken carbon fibre reinforced
plastic parts, I haven't broken any of that stuff yet personally. I
guess that's why I happily go on using my CFRP forks, cranks, brake
levers, and so on.

One day though, there won't be a material left to make safe bicycles from.


Steel mostly fails in a slower fashion, not in a sudden snap. You feel
things becoming mushy, like after a spoke broke.


Yes and no. I've broken steel pedal spindles catastrophically. Spokes go all at once. Steel fasteners snap -- axles, too. Lots of steel things will snap, including bars after enough high energy fatigue cycles.


I'll add our original tandem front forks to the list.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #46  
Old August 6th 19, 07:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,592
Default Crashing and Aging

On 8/6/2019 10:52 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-05 21:55, Andre Jute wrote:
On Tuesday, August 6, 2019 at 2:10:34 AM UTC+1, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 8:41:29 PM UTC-4, Andre Jute wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 9:29:26 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 1:33:00 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute
wrote:

Somebody on my ride was saying only the other day that
crashes at our age are so much more consequential. Though
they were talking about breaking a hip, I thought of that
when a couple of days later I fell while dismounting from my
bike (I hooked the mixte bar between my foot and its heel)
and landed so heavily that the deep dent in my helmet looks
like the most dangerous accident I've had in 30 years of
cycling -- from a standstill! The helmet saved me from a gash
on the head, painful stitches, and perhaps even a concussion.
That's definitely worth its price.

Andre Jute Not an old crock

Modern safety helmets reduce concussions not by softening the
blow via cushioning with the Styrofoam but by fracturing and
breaking via the "vent" holes in the helmet. I have a Bontrager
Wavecell helmet and it has a lot less vents for two reasons -
1. Unlike Styrofoam air passes rather freely though the open
core material and 2. you have to have the Wavecell material
covering most of your head to have the expected effect.

So my helmet isn't wrecked by the impact-dent?

Separate question. That helmet is actually pretty old, being on
its third bike. Is there a natural raging process (embrittling?)
of helmet materials that requires helmets to be replaced after x
time?

Andre Jute

I think that aging of the foam in a helmet depends on t he foam
material itself plus incidentals such as exposure to sunlight
(UVA/UVB rays)bumps it has suffered and even exposure to sweat. I
have an old hard-shell Vetta helmet here that appears to be in mint
condition. I guess it'd take a microscopic examination of the
underlying foam section to tell if the foam has deteriorated.

Manufacturers like to sell helmets and also protect themselves from
litigation and thus many helmet manufacturers tell customers to
replace the helmet every five years or some other number of years
and also to replace the helmet if it has suffered a hard knock or
fall.

Cheers


Thanks, Ridealot. I'll inspectÂ* the outside shell under a strong
light and magnification for cracks. None are visible with the naked
eye.


In the UK that may not be such a big deal but here in sunny California I
had to retire a helmet because the UV content of the sun light started
to embrittle the shell. It was only about three years old.


Helmet manufacturers used to routinely say every helmet should be
replaced every three years. Why? Because supposedly the magic foam could
be degraded by sunlight, or maybe fumes, or maybe heat, or maybe by
dropping them on the floor, or maybe just age.

It was a nice marketing trick, dutifully parroted by many "safety"
organizations. (And I heard that sledge hammer manufacturers briefly
thought about mimicking it. "Hey! More sales!" But the hammer
manufacturers had more honesty.)

Then some lab tested old helmets. From the world's most rabid helmet
promotion website: "In 2015 MEA Forensic reported on their extensive
testing of used (but not crashed) bicycle helmets shows that the foam
liners retain their performance over many years. Some of the helmets
were as old as 26 years. They crash tested 675 helmets in their lab.
Their analysis showed that there was no significant impact performance
change with age. Their data including all 675 helmets tested produced
only a 0.7g per year increase in impact readings at the higher drop
height. After crash testing the helmets on a standard test rig, MEA took
core samples from an uncrashed area of 63 helmets and tested them. This
generated data based solely on the foam performance. Again, the findings
indicate that helmet liner foam does not deteriorate with age."

So last time I looked, Bell Sports changed its tune. They still said you
should replace your helmet every three years (of course!) but not
because it won't work. Instead, to "take advantage of improvements in
technology and styling" or some such nonsense.

Back in the 1960s, I think it was General Motors who advertised
"Wouldn't you rather have _this_ year's model?" It really meant "We
really want you to buy another car. We need the money."


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #47  
Old August 6th 19, 07:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,821
Default Handebar broke off - nasty cash

On 2019-08-06 07:55, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Tuesday, August 6, 2019 at 10:45:23 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-05 16:28, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 6:22:32 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-05 15:10, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 4:55:14 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-05 13:36, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 1:03:30 PM UTC-7, jbeattie
wrote:

Yes and no. I've broken steel pedal spindles
catastrophically. Spokes go all at once. Steel
fasteners snap -- axles, too. Lots of steel things will
snap, including bars after enough high energy fatigue
cycles.

-- Jay Beattie.


Cast steel will fail suddenly but with any kind of pipe
structure that's rare.


I broke a Look steel pedal spindle on a couple of
occasions. Had steel saddle rails break off and steel
spokes break in one swell foop. I have seen steel bicycle
frames fail suddenly and steel bars suddenly bend upon
hitting a pothole.


A pothole can be like an accident, like hitting an object.


Nothing is permanent in this world so I got used to it.


However, one should seek the more permanent stuff versus
the less than permanent stuff. It's like with cars.
Japanese ones are among the best but even they break down.
My wife's Toyota developed a steering rack leak afer 23
years. Unbelievable. Only 23 years. $940 later it's all
fixed. At least it didn't fail on the road, just very
gradually. My Mitsubishi is 22 years and, nada. Not even a
dome light has had the audacity to burn out. I sure wish
bicycle manufacturers would learn about that level of
quality.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Maybe you should use the tires and other components these
guys use?


Well, I do have an MTB steel handlebar on the road bike now.
Also MTB pedals (for years).


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_IFoSKTl1Y

I'm sure the trails in your area are not as knarly as
whatthese guys are riding over.


That's steep but not gnarly at all. Gnarly to me means full of
ruts, big rocks and stuff. Things where you can get really hurt
in a crash. Here is one of our trails and that is gnarly:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y38JzV-ueXI

People have died on that one. Went off the cliff edge which
doesn't look dangerous but the grease brush doesn't hold
anyhting and afterwards it's an almost vertical fall (onto
rocks).

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Did you watch the ENTIRE video?


Yes.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Well then you must have seen them riding over rock strewn sections of
trails, jumping over some sections and landing on rocks and doing all
t hat whilst riding a high rate of speed. Looking at the two videos
your clip does NOT compare at all to the route those guys took in the
video I posted the link to.


Here we disagree.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #48  
Old August 6th 19, 08:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,488
Default Handebar broke off - nasty cash

On Tuesday, August 6, 2019 at 2:54:58 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-06 07:55, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Tuesday, August 6, 2019 at 10:45:23 AM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-05 16:28, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 6:22:32 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-05 15:10, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 4:55:14 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-08-05 13:36, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 1:03:30 PM UTC-7, jbeattie
wrote:

Yes and no. I've broken steel pedal spindles
catastrophically. Spokes go all at once. Steel
fasteners snap -- axles, too. Lots of steel things will
snap, including bars after enough high energy fatigue
cycles.

-- Jay Beattie.


Cast steel will fail suddenly but with any kind of pipe
structure that's rare.


I broke a Look steel pedal spindle on a couple of
occasions. Had steel saddle rails break off and steel
spokes break in one swell foop. I have seen steel bicycle
frames fail suddenly and steel bars suddenly bend upon
hitting a pothole.


A pothole can be like an accident, like hitting an object.


Nothing is permanent in this world so I got used to it.


However, one should seek the more permanent stuff versus
the less than permanent stuff. It's like with cars.
Japanese ones are among the best but even they break down.
My wife's Toyota developed a steering rack leak afer 23
years. Unbelievable. Only 23 years. $940 later it's all
fixed. At least it didn't fail on the road, just very
gradually. My Mitsubishi is 22 years and, nada. Not even a
dome light has had the audacity to burn out. I sure wish
bicycle manufacturers would learn about that level of
quality.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Maybe you should use the tires and other components these
guys use?


Well, I do have an MTB steel handlebar on the road bike now.
Also MTB pedals (for years).


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_IFoSKTl1Y

I'm sure the trails in your area are not as knarly as
whatthese guys are riding over.


That's steep but not gnarly at all. Gnarly to me means full of
ruts, big rocks and stuff. Things where you can get really hurt
in a crash. Here is one of our trails and that is gnarly:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y38JzV-ueXI

People have died on that one. Went off the cliff edge which
doesn't look dangerous but the grease brush doesn't hold
anyhting and afterwards it's an almost vertical fall (onto
rocks).

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Did you watch the ENTIRE video?


Yes.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Well then you must have seen them riding over rock strewn sections of
trails, jumping over some sections and landing on rocks and doing all
that whilst riding a high rate of speed. Looking at the two videos
your clip does NOT compare at all to the route those guys took in the
video I posted the link to.


Here we disagree.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Try watching this one. It's the same race. 4:32, 5:30, 5:54, 6:10+, 7:00, 7:28, 9:46+, 10:10, 11:05, 11:22, 13:20, 13:38+, 13:55, 19:15 - 19:25+, and so on. Plus they're riding that course at speed not just picking their way through it.

I wonder how the tires and the rest of the bikes make it through such a punishing course.

Cheers
  #49  
Old August 6th 19, 11:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,258
Default Handebar broke off - nasty cash

On Monday, August 5, 2019 at 9:03:30 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:

Yes and no. I've broken steel pedal spindles catastrophically.


I snapped off a steel pedal axle once, but it wasn't from fatigue cycles or even because it was bad steel, though it was a vintage pedal made when lots of British steel was ****poot. It was an accident where I was speeding in the dark on a familiar road and since I rode there last a harvesting machine or a tractor had knocked the part of the road I counted on down into the ditch; I was going too fast for my lamps to pick up the damage on the road.. The pedal caught on the new edge of the road, the drop into the ditch was longer than the pedal arm, and my expensive vintage pedal was a casualty.

Andre Jute
I've on many creative edges, but this was the first time physically over the edge
  #50  
Old August 7th 19, 12:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 497
Default Handebar broke off - nasty cash

On Tue, 06 Aug 2019 07:49:44 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2019-08-06 00:55, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 05 Aug 2019 13:55:13 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2019-08-05 13:36, Tom Kunich wrote:


[...]


Nothing is permanent in this world so I got used to it.


However, one should seek the more permanent stuff versus the less than
permanent stuff. It's like with cars. Japanese ones are among the best
but even they break down. My wife's Toyota developed a steering rack
leak afer 23 years. Unbelievable. Only 23 years. $940 later it's all
fixed. At least it didn't fail on the road, just very gradually. My
Mitsubishi is 22 years and, nada. Not even a dome light has had the
audacity to burn out. I sure wish bicycle manufacturers would learn
about that level of quality.


I see a 2020 Mitsubishi Eclipse, weighing in the neighborhood of 3500
lbs.and costing US$ 24,085. I suggest that anyone selling bicycles
built to those standards probably make a "live for ever" bicycle.



That Mitsubishi can comfortably carry four people, baggae and if needed
a small trailer. Mine (Montero Sport) can carry half a ton of firewood,
and has, many times.

A bicycle only needs to carry ne rider and modest baggage. How much
effort and weight would it have taken to coat the steel stiffener tube
before pressing it in? 0.01oz? 0.02oz?

Yes, they could do better.


You are defining the needs of autos and bicycles in a manner that
"proves" your points and is wholly false. You appear to claim that an
auto is capable of carrying 4 people and baggage and a half ton of
firewood and thus is a "standard" for autos. But I owned a MG that
could carry two passengers and a tiny amount of luggage and no
firewood at all.

You say that a bicycle carries the rider and a modest amount of
barrage yet Frank frequently mentions his bicycle that carries both
himself and his wife and when I was in Vietnam the guys in the welding
shop built "a bicycle built for 5" and test rode it on the parking
ramp.

It hardly seems logical to compare a $24,000, 3.500 lb behemoth with a
bicycle but you do it all the time and than when someone argues you
start talking about tons of wood.
--

Cheers,

John B.
 




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