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  #61  
Old August 13th 19, 12:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 9,635
Default Andrew

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 6:45:40 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 9:47:25 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 2:58:53 PM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/10/2019 10:39 PM, news18 wrote:
On Sat, 10 Aug 2019 14:55:26 -0700, Andre Jute wrote:

On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 8:08:11 PM UTC+1, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 9:45:45 AM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 9:01:33 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 4:16:53 PM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 7:21:12 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute
wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 3:41:31 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/9/2019 9:21 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Saturday, August 10, 2019 at 1:23:24 AM UTC+1, AMuzi
wrote:
On 8/9/2019 6:10 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
Andre Jute Economics isn't difficult: it is the
commonsense activities of individuals considered in
aggregate.


???

If the query is about the tagline to my sig, many
economists with real life experience in business are
moving away from the first two great commandments of
classical economics, viz that all individuals in every
market are fully informed and fully rational in every
decision. That is clearly not so. We don't need to go
further afield than RBT for an example.

Of course we don't go as far as Krugman, who is so
Post-Modern, he's totally unmoored from reality, indeed
he's unattached to anything he said yesterday or the day
before, though in a few days he'll probably spout the
same weirdness as he did a couple of weeks ago. In fact,
he's so cyclically insane, we should make him an honorary
member of RBT.

Andre Jute Sane since I was 13. I wonder how I managed
that.


Krugman is indeed unhinged and he was even before Trump
Derangement Syndrome.


I must quibble that although many individual investors are
frequently wrong, and provably so, the wisdom of crowds is
a real thing and an amazingly reliable economic indicator.
Nor infallible, but amazingly prescient usually.

I agree. However, the mob is never right. The trick is to
distinguish the mob from the crowd.



Andre Jute I can't believe the foolishness of historians
who equate the French and American Revolutions. The French
wanted to raise a ravening mob of murderers, the American
Founding Fathers created the Electoral College and other
enduring institutions specifically to defend minorities
against the mob.


No one understood it better than Burke:

https://www.alibris.com/Reflections-...Revolution-in-
France-Edmund-Burke/book/5612177?matches=601

An excellent short read and starting at just 99 cents.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Thanks, Andrew. I know it, and in fact have it (free from
Project Gutenberg) on iBooks to read on my treadmill, but first
I want to read Thomas Carlyle History of the French Revolution
again, to which Burke makes a suitable coda. At the moment I'm
working my way through Stephen Meyers Darwin's Doubt, which may
be the most important book of the century so far, and Carlyle
is next. He's an agreeable stylist and a meticulous historian,
so I won't be rushing the pleasure.


Pffff (blowing out coffee). Darwin's Doubt the most important
book of the century so far?

The only thing more important than where we came from is where
we're going. Any ideas?

Yikes, an ID book?

Have you actually read it? I haven't finished it but I'm far enough
to know that his dissection of all the other theories is
fair-minded and persausive.

No, I've only read the reviews -- and I will admit my prejudices,
which a (1) whenever I finish a book that involves religion or
philosophy chasing science, or vice versa, I feel like I've wasted my
time. The book may illuminate some current controversy, but that
controversy is usually gone in ten years or has mutated like a virus
into a different controversy. It started out as creationism, mutated
into intelligent design and will be something different in five years
-- maybe go back to ancient astronauts or the Illuminati. Meanwhile,
the actual scientific community plods along with evolution. One hopes
for primary work that really proves something rather than a curated,
retrospective review of prior research with a new gloss. (2) I'm not
against God or intelligent design, but really, if you were an
all-powerful God, would you create a Trilobite? Why not a dog or a
Swedish bikini model. The God envisioned by these people is so lame.

-- Jay Beattie.

Jay, I don't think that you realize the problems with Darwin. While
improvement of the species certainly is possible in the time since
Darwin we have never witnessed speciation due to evolution.

Just the human genome itself would require about several thousand
mutations per second since life first appeared on Earth to have reached
the present point of development. The numbers are simply far too large
for Darwin's theories to ever work on the large scale necessary.

The probabilistic difficulty is worse even than that, Tom. Forget
humans, which are a large, complex afterthought to upright apes which
are already impossible to explain, and let's just stick to the large
animals in the Cambrian Era. It turns out, if you work the numbers, that
protein A seeking protein B will have to do it blindfold in a genetic
space larger than all the atoms in the cosmos, littered with ineffectual
rubbish proteins, and that's just to make one cell. It will take more
than all the time since the Earth was created (about 3.8bn years).

That concept is more akin to the evolution of human knowledge, much of
which can be shown to have independently evolved in different places.
There is no evidence to support that there was ever one protein A seeking
one protein B.


Andre Jute The cutting edge

From the man who thinks that giddens wrote the history of the world.


He actually did. Or at l;east everything worth knowing:

https://www.alibris.com/Gibbons-Decl...438?matches=65

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


And the rest is iteration of history's failures by those who didn't read Gibbon, an awful lesson? Actually the Middle Ages were a time of peace and plenty for most people as the Roman Church spread agricultural best practice through the Christian world, which for a good long time was nearly co-terminous with the Roman Empire, and presumably at least a bit beyond its borders, and there was global warming which also lifted everyone's spirits and standard of living. But that's at least partly a lesson in the power of communication, belonging to economic history, while Gibbon's main theme is arguably one of morality, duty and sacrifice; those old Romans who built the upstanding republic and later the decadent empire were pretty grim, not a giggle* among the lot of them.

In one school vacation I led a blind lawyer around and in the evenings read to him. He was a fast listener, so I read at a fast clip, and finished the libretto of Da Ponte's Don Giovanni in an evening with time to spare before his bedtime, so, after a few valuable tips on my Italian pronunciation (blind people listen better!), he told me I could choose the next volume from his shelf. Not wanting to be obvious and choose my own fave, Shakespeare, I chose Gibbon. "No, no," he said, "that bloody man is a moralist. Choose a realist. Goethe! Let's have Faustus." By the time I'd read aloud through most of Goethe in gloomy German, I was absolutely convinced that the only thing worse than a moralist is a romantic.


Hey, if I go blind, remind me not to call you. I think they were forcing confessions from the prisoners at Guantanamo Bay by reading them opera librettos. By scene two, the prisoners were requesting water-boarding. And your blind buddy hates moralists, and you read him Don Juan/Giovani? Okey-dokey. You should have taken him down to the pub to play darts.

-- Jay Beattie.


They were his books, and he chose what we read.

Most opera libretti read like ****. "Darling, send out for another pizza" isn't worth being set to sublime music. I learned Russian to read Boris Godunov in the original. Not worth it for the poetry but I got several other worthwhile advantages out of speaking Russian.

Andre Jute
I have a new watch I want to disassemble, so cheers for now
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  #62  
Old August 13th 19, 05:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Posts: 658
Default Andrew

On Mon, 12 Aug 2019 11:27:11 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 4:58:26 PM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On Sun, 11 Aug 2019 10:09:24 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

That gives me the distinct impression that you've never worked in
science nor even around scientists.

So exactly what were your scientists doing in their "science" work.


As of this moment physicists are attempting to prove or disprove several
lines of thought of quantum mechanics most of which are so unlikely that
they make Creation sound absolute a given.

We have childish claims mostly not by scientists but moronic
"journalists" that there COULD be life on other planets.


It isn't "journalist that create these claims, but "scientist making
their thought bubbles public under the requirement for PR action".

The math on
THIS is also flawed to the point where impossibility seems to be the
actual result.


Then again, maths in an ongoing process.

Darwin's theory is so unlikely given the mathematics behind it (which
was known AT THE TIME OF DARWIN) that one has to wonder what would ever
have brought anyone to even give it a second thought.


The entire problem with your argument is that you seem to be under the
premise that all species are totally distinct and different from each
other. The mathematice changes when you start to group by similarities
and again when you start to examine common genetic code.

Being able to answer why the sky is blue is not in the least answering
why the mechanics happen to operate in that manner.

So you thing Dog made the sky blue!

  #63  
Old August 13th 19, 05:02 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Posts: 658
Default Andrew

On Mon, 12 Aug 2019 10:55:56 -0700, Andre Jute wrote:

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 12:58:26 AM UTC+1, news18 wrote:
On Sun, 11 Aug 2019 10:09:24 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

That gives me the distinct impression that you've never worked in
science nor even around scientists.

So exactly what were your scientists doing in their "science" work.


What makes you think Tom has to answer a troll like you?


Ask him. Why do you?

Sneering and jeering doesn't make your dick grow, sonny, it just turns
you into a no-count fool in everyone's eyes.


Lol, "Gee Mum, everyone else is"

Andre Jute If you can't manage amusing snark, please try at least to
make it intelligent


Please lead by example.

  #64  
Old August 13th 19, 05:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Posts: 658
Default Andrew

On Mon, 12 Aug 2019 10:52:32 -0700, Andre Jute wrote:

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 2:03:05 AM UTC+1, James wrote:
On 12/8/19 3:03 am, Tom Kunich wrote:


I gave you the numbers - mutations would have to occur thousands per
second. And yet since the time of Darwin not a single new species has
arisen.


As we are still finding "new species" at an alarming rate, I'm not sure
anyone can proclaim what you just did.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scien.../meet-the-new-

species-748819/

--
JS


Pft! I've seen kipunji when I walked up some bloody mountain in East
Africa with the college mountain club because I wanted to get into the
pants of a keen lady mountaineer.

Perhaps if you had spent some effort in publiscing the species, your
claim might have been gredible

(Waste of effort. She turned out to be a closeted lesbian.)


A woman of taste no doubt.


* One day I waited on my bike on the footbridge over the river for a
photographer with his back to me to finish photographing five young
herons flying loop de loop inches in front of the monstrously thick and
long lens he was pointing freehand at them. I said helpfully to his
back, "Sir, you need to put a tripod under that heavy lens or at such
close range you'll shoot nothing but a blur." He took another sequence
of shots, then turned to me. It was Richard Mills, a distinguished,
multi-awarded photographer who, obviously, doesn't have shaking hands.
He said, "Ah, I thought it would be you, Andre." Here's a book by a
sometime editor of mine with Richard's photographs:
http://www.obrien.ie/west-cork-a-place-apart


Lol, name dropping again.

  #65  
Old August 13th 19, 05:09 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Posts: 658
Default Andrew

On Mon, 12 Aug 2019 11:32:11 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 6:03:05 PM UTC-7, James wrote:
On 12/8/19 3:03 am, Tom Kunich wrote:


I gave you the numbers - mutations would have to occur thousands per
second. And yet since the time of Darwin not a single new species has
arisen.


As we are still finding "new species" at an alarming rate, I'm not sure
anyone can proclaim what you just did.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scien.../meet-the-new-

species-748819/

--
JS


The trouble is that when you know the environment in which a "new"
species is discovered you know where to look for historic records such
as fossils would be found and there they are.


This can be true. Knowledge of even recent species can be "lost" to
common awareness. OTOH, sharing knowledge can result in the "trashing" of
the species/area.

  #66  
Old August 13th 19, 05:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Posts: 658
Default Andrew

On Mon, 12 Aug 2019 11:29:36 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 5:01:28 PM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On Sun, 11 Aug 2019 10:03:31 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:



I gave you the numbers - mutations would have to occur thousands per
second. And yet since the time of Darwin not a single new species has
arisen.


But we are doing out best by flooding the world with radiation and
toxic chemicals. Good work takes time. BTW, they have actually
identified 1,000s of new species since Darwin first wrtote.
It takes time Or you can agree with others that the minute change in
an insect


What in the hell does identifying unknown species have to do with new
species being brought into existence due to the Theory of Evolution? Not
ONE of these species hasn't been in existence during the entire time of
the records.


Are you sure?

  #67  
Old August 13th 19, 05:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Posts: 658
Default Andrew

On Mon, 12 Aug 2019 12:02:14 -0500, AMuzi wrote:



What I meant by that is the history of my people is endlessly
fascinating; the history of the rest of you not so much.


Aah, studying dead sex are we?

  #68  
Old August 13th 19, 04:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 1,231
Default Andrew

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 9:00:51 PM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On Mon, 12 Aug 2019 11:27:11 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

Darwin's theory is so unlikely given the mathematics behind it (which
was known AT THE TIME OF DARWIN) that one has to wonder what would ever
have brought anyone to even give it a second thought.


The entire problem with your argument is that you seem to be under the
premise that all species are totally distinct and different from each
other. The mathematice changes when you start to group by similarities
and again when you start to examine common genetic code.

So you thing Dog made the sky blue!


Whoever would have guessed that a Zebra and a North American cougar aren't the same species?
  #69  
Old August 14th 19, 04:49 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Posts: 658
Default Andrew

On Tue, 13 Aug 2019 08:42:24 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 9:00:51 PM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On Mon, 12 Aug 2019 11:27:11 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

Darwin's theory is so unlikely given the mathematics behind it (which
was known AT THE TIME OF DARWIN) that one has to wonder what would
ever have brought anyone to even give it a second thought.


The entire problem with your argument is that you seem to be under the
premise that all species are totally distinct and different from each
other. The mathematice changes when you start to group by similarities
and again when you start to examine common genetic code.

So you thing Dog made the sky blue!


Whoever would have guessed that a Zebra and a North American cougar
aren't the same species?


Funny,but a tree of life on my wall says they share a common ancestor.

  #70  
Old August 14th 19, 06:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
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Posts: 1,654
Default Andrew

On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 03:49:13 -0000 (UTC), news18
wrote:

On Tue, 13 Aug 2019 08:42:24 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 9:00:51 PM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On Mon, 12 Aug 2019 11:27:11 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

Darwin's theory is so unlikely given the mathematics behind it (which
was known AT THE TIME OF DARWIN) that one has to wonder what would
ever have brought anyone to even give it a second thought.

The entire problem with your argument is that you seem to be under the
premise that all species are totally distinct and different from each
other. The mathematice changes when you start to group by similarities
and again when you start to examine common genetic code.

So you thing Dog made the sky blue!


Whoever would have guessed that a Zebra and a North American cougar
aren't the same species?


Funny,but a tree of life on my wall says they share a common ancestor.


Common Ancestor? Chimpanzees share from 98.9 - 99% of human DNA. In
addition they chare a reproduction cycle similar to that of humans,
with most reaching sexual maturity just before or during their teenage
years. They also have a gestation period for about 8 months.
--
cheers,

John B.

 




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