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Does anyone know PM-PM-F/R203 adapters



 
 
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  #31  
Old November 14th 17, 06:33 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,554
Default Does anyone know PM-PM-F/R203 adapters

On Mon, 13 Nov 2017 16:56:07 -0800 (PST), jbeattie
wrote:

On Monday, November 13, 2017 at 3:18:45 PM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/13/2017 5:07 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, November 13, 2017 at 10:17:14 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-12 18:13, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 12 Nov 2017 07:38:50 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-11 18:13, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:39:42 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-11 07:51, jbeattie wrote:


[...]

... Avid uses a
higher torque spec. 5nm should be plenty to keep your stem and
headset tight, but probably not in Cameron Park.


It does but only if I smear some grit-laden toothpaste on the fork tube
before sliding on the stem. Not the paste for electric brushing but the
regular paste. What I am saying is that 5nm feels like it's about to
strip the aluminum threads out.

I think I'd buy a torque meter. And use it :-)


Trying to be a minimalist I have a makeshift one that was ridiculed here
but when compared to pro gear is more accurate than anything from a
hardware sto A digital suitcase scale. I can torque a screw to
precisely 44 in-lbs. Not 42 or 46 but exactly 44. Try that with one of
those ratchet gizmos.


Yup, you can use a scale and a carefully measured length wrench but it
is hardly necessary as torque limits always seem to be quite liberal.
Shimano specifies 2 - 4 Nm (18 - 36 "lbs) for brake disc attaching
bolts. No need to get right down to the nth degree.


I know. Just mentioned it because there are people here who seriously
think the suitcase scale method is inaccurate.

No, it's just dopey -- it's like using a nail and a hammer to remove a chain rivet . . . oh wait. Never mind.

-- Jay Beattie.


eh what do we know? Never broke a front axle. Ever. You?


Yes, but only because it melted while going 140mph down a volcano in 125 degree heat here in Portland. My tire also caught fire. The guy in front of me lost his brake and couldn't stop. It was lucky he had his drag-chute. http://www.gagnesports.com/wp-conten...chute-bike.jpg Otherwise, he would have crashed.

I ALWAYS ride with a drag-chute! It's hooked up to a release mechanism in my rear pannier -- in the pocket next to the heart-lung machine. I never take chances, and that's why I won't ride on the road . . . ever. It's too dangerous.

-- Jay Beattie.


At the speeds you ride I'd think that a zero-zero ejection system
would be superior and being zero speed and zero altitude it could also
be used to avoid the occasional harassing auto.
--
Cheers,

John B.

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  #32  
Old November 14th 17, 06:41 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,554
Default Does anyone know PM-PM-F/R203 adapters

On Tue, 14 Nov 2017 02:30:03 +0000 (UTC), Ralph Barone
wrote:

jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, November 13, 2017 at 3:18:45 PM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/13/2017 5:07 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, November 13, 2017 at 10:17:14 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-12 18:13, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 12 Nov 2017 07:38:50 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-11 18:13, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:39:42 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-11 07:51, jbeattie wrote:


[...]

... Avid uses a
higher torque spec. 5nm should be plenty to keep your stem and
headset tight, but probably not in Cameron Park.


It does but only if I smear some grit-laden toothpaste on the fork tube
before sliding on the stem. Not the paste for electric brushing but the
regular paste. What I am saying is that 5nm feels like it's about to
strip the aluminum threads out.

I think I'd buy a torque meter. And use it :-)


Trying to be a minimalist I have a makeshift one that was ridiculed here
but when compared to pro gear is more accurate than anything from a
hardware sto A digital suitcase scale. I can torque a screw to
precisely 44 in-lbs. Not 42 or 46 but exactly 44. Try that with one of
those ratchet gizmos.


Yup, you can use a scale and a carefully measured length wrench but it
is hardly necessary as torque limits always seem to be quite liberal.
Shimano specifies 2 - 4 Nm (18 - 36 "lbs) for brake disc attaching
bolts. No need to get right down to the nth degree.


I know. Just mentioned it because there are people here who seriously
think the suitcase scale method is inaccurate.

No, it's just dopey -- it's like using a nail and a hammer to remove a
chain rivet . . . oh wait. Never mind.

-- Jay Beattie.


eh what do we know? Never broke a front axle. Ever. You?


Yes, but only because it melted while going 140mph down a volcano in 125
degree heat here in Portland. My tire also caught fire. The guy in front
of me lost his brake and couldn't stop. It was lucky he had his
drag-chute. http://www.gagnesports.com/wp-conten...chute-bike.jpg
Otherwise, he would have crashed.

I ALWAYS ride with a drag-chute! It's hooked up to a release mechanism in
my rear pannier -- in the pocket next to the heart-lung machine. I never
take chances, and that's why I won't ride on the road . . . ever. It's too dangerous.

-- Jay Beattie.


I call bull****. It never gets up to 125 in Portland.


Ah but you are forgetting "Aerodynamic heating", the heating of a
solid body produced by its high-speed passage through air whereby its
kinetic energy is converted to heat by skin friction on the surface of
the object at a rate that depends on the viscosity and speed of the
air.

Those left coast riders are really fast :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #33  
Old November 14th 17, 10:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,615
Default Does anyone know PM-PM-F/R203 adapters

On 2017-11-13 17:33, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, November 13, 2017 at 3:21:35 PM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-13 15:07, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, November 13, 2017 at 10:17:14 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-12 18:13, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 12 Nov 2017 07:38:50 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-11 18:13, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:39:42 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-11 07:51, jbeattie wrote:


[...]

... Avid uses a higher torque spec. 5nm should be
plenty to keep your stem and headset tight, but
probably not in Cameron Park.


It does but only if I smear some grit-laden toothpaste
on the fork tube before sliding on the stem. Not the
paste for electric brushing but the regular paste. What
I am saying is that 5nm feels like it's about to strip
the aluminum threads out.

I think I'd buy a torque meter. And use it :-)


Trying to be a minimalist I have a makeshift one that was
ridiculed here but when compared to pro gear is more
accurate than anything from a hardware sto A digital
suitcase scale. I can torque a screw to precisely 44
in-lbs. Not 42 or 46 but exactly 44. Try that with one of
those ratchet gizmos.


Yup, you can use a scale and a carefully measured length
wrench but it is hardly necessary as torque limits always
seem to be quite liberal. Shimano specifies 2 - 4 Nm (18 - 36
"lbs) for brake disc attaching bolts. No need to get right
down to the nth degree.


I know. Just mentioned it because there are people here who
seriously think the suitcase scale method is inaccurate.

No, it's just dopey -- it's like using a nail and a hammer to
remove a chain rivet . . . oh wait. Never mind.


Both methods work fine. Until I got a digital scale as a present I
used a butcher "hook scale" which was just fine. As for the hammer
and nail that is how I opened scores of chains when I had used them
up as a university student. When all you have is a single room of
150sqft or less and your monthly budget is $300 including rent,
utilities, food, books, beer and all you learn minimalist
strategies quickly.


Minimalist would be to skip the beer and buy a $3 tool.


Nooo!

Also, minimalist to me isn't being Mr.Frugal but trying to live with the
least amount of stuff. If I had a bike repair shop I'd naturally have a
chain breaker (but not a chintzy $3 edition) and several torque
wrenches. BEing a hobbyist I simply don't see teh need.


I bought a Cyclo Rivoli when I was 12 years old. It was maybe $3
(probably less).
https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8222/...25e6f46e_z.jpg It
was part of my extensive tool kit.
https://tse2.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.1...=0&w=240&h=160

I went to college with tackle box of tools, a Silca floor pump and a
bunch of sew-ups. No dorms -- just a room in a ****-hole house with
three other guys. I had a PX10 and no car.


Similar with me. However, I invested any free cash I had in electronics
parts and ham radio. Oh, and beer.


Since about two years I am the proud owner of a chain breaker
because it was part of a PricePoint bike tool kit. I wish they had
thrown in a T-25 driver instead because that can't easily be
kludged. Do I get my chains open any faster? Nope.


Well, I hope you're not opening your chains with a tool considering
they probably come with a master-link. You do have to shorten them,
and I'll race you any day of the week shortening a chain -- you and
your nail and hammer, and me and my chain tool. I'll have the chain
shortened before you strike your first blow.



You'd be surprised. The anvil is always on the bench where I work in
chains et cetera. The whole bike goes on there for maintenance. The nail
used to sit in the top drawer next to the screwdrivers and the hammers
are five drawers below. It was fast. But now I have a chain tool because
it came with a large kit.

Oh, and by the way, the chain breaker of a friend didn't work with a
thick 5-speed chain. So I went home and got that nail ...


BTW you also need some rock or a sturdy surface and a steel nut,
any old nut, to lay the chain link onto so the pin flies into that.
For that purpose I used a chunk of railroad flat-bottom rail as an
anvil which I still have.


Maybe you do, but for the last 45+ years, I've just used a tool.


It's even more extreme with brewing. The fancy guys have a $800
stainless steel fermenter, I use two $15 food grade 6-1/2 gallon pails
(and thus can and do brew two different beers). The beer doesn't taste
any different and it doesn't go any faster.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #34  
Old November 14th 17, 10:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,615
Default Does anyone know PM-PM-F/R203 adapters

On 2017-11-13 18:49, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/13/2017 7:31 PM, Joerg wrote:


There are people who always say that if a bike didn't cost at least
$10k it's junk. I have a different philosophy. If a piece of technical
equipment is priced somewhere in a reasonable mid-range I expect it to
last. Just like the performance we expect (and get) from our cars
which are more towards the lower end of the price spectrum. That is
not asking too much.


I agree about expecting things to last. And I've done pretty well with
bikes. But just yesterday, I was saying to one of my good riding friends
that I'm disappointed in my Cannondale touring bike. Corrosion has
bubbled some of the paint. Maybe this winter I'll pay for a respray or
for powder coat. Damn thing is only 31 years old.


Should have bought a Gazelle frame :-)

Mine is from 1982 and has live in Europe much of its life where they
used to liberally spray salt during winter.


The 1972 Raleigh is still going strong, but of course it's not all
original. The old custom tandem is doing well too, except for the
terribly designed front fork that broke after only 29 years. I really am
****ed about that. The folding bike is perfect, but it's only 11 years
old, and it doesn't get all that much use.

Regarding cars - well, I can't even remember how many we've used up
since the 1970s. It's a lot. I managed to keep one going until it was 26
years old because I liked it so well, but that became a constant repair
project.


Our two cars are now 21 and 22 years old. Not a lick of trouble and they
look like new. No rust, nada. The Audi Station wagon I had in Germany
pretty much survived owner #3 and AFAIK is still going, built in 1987.
The pickup truck of my MTB riding buddy is from the mid 50's. It has a
new engine but only because the previous owner wanted more oomph.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #35  
Old November 15th 17, 08:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,393
Default Does anyone know PM-PM-F/R203 adapters

On 11/14/2017 4:13 PM, Joerg wrote:


Our two cars are now 21 and 22 years old. Not a lick of trouble and they
look like new.


Yes, I remember your claim that despite its age, at least one of your
cars has never needed any repair, not even to have a light bulb changed.

I wonder if anyone here really believes you. I certainly don't.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #36  
Old November 16th 17, 07:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,615
Default Does anyone know PM-PM-F/R203 adapters

On 2017-11-15 11:08, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/14/2017 4:13 PM, Joerg wrote:


Our two cars are now 21 and 22 years old. Not a lick of trouble and
they look like new.


Yes, I remember your claim that despite its age, at least one of your
cars has never needed any repair, not even to have a light bulb changed.


Correct. The Mitsubishi Montero Sport from 1997. Of course I had the
timing belts swapped because of age. When they came out they looked like
new. Just like we humans buy new shoes and undergo colonoscopies after a
certain age cars also need PM and check-ups.

What I claimed was that there was never a defect. Because there wasn't.


I wonder if anyone here really believes you. I certainly don't.


I do not care.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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