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The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 11th 05, 08:08 AM
Blair P. Houghton
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Default The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.


I got my new wheels. Neuvation M28 Aeros. Cheap, but well
reviewed.

I got a new cassette because moving from 6 to 9 speeds was
part of the justification for the new wheels (the old cogs
are on a freewheel and it's a bit eccentric).

I got a new chain because of the new 9-speed, and a spare
one.

I got new tires and tubes because these are 700C wheels and
my old ones are 27-inch.

I got a cassette tool and a chain whip (in case I had to
remove the cassette once I had it installed).

I got rim tape.

I put the cassette on the wheels, put a tube and tire on
the rear wheel, pumped it up, listened to it blow off,
removed it, put a new tube in, pumped it up, and then put a
tube and tire on the front without incident. The one that
blew must have been defective, because I double-checked
the bead after I set it, and the others aren't showing
any signs of weakness.

I racked my bike, removed its wheels, broke the chain, put
the new front wheel on, and went to put the rear on.

Um.

The new rear hub is 130 mm wide.

Turns out I'd mis-measured my rear stays and they're only
124 mm. The frame is made of steel. It's reinforced by the
brake mount, so it doesn't flex much the way I need it to.
No way am I bending this frame, and I really don't want to
have anyone else do it either.

So I'm kinda screwed at this point.

I can't put this wheel on this frame. The front fits fine.

I can't use a 130-mm rear. And if I switch the hub out,
I'll probably not be able to use a 9-speed cassette.

Dammit.

How did I measure that wrong? I used a caliper and it's way
the hell off. Maybe I measured the front and assumed...

Dammit.

DAMMIT DAMMIT DAMMIT.

And now I can't ride tomorrow because I broke the chain and
I don't have a replacement pin for it...

Maybe the new chain will work. It has a split link, so I
can afford to try it. It might slip between the cogs,
though. And I'll need to lube it, if not strip and lube
it...

Or I can pull my MTB off its hook and go ride in South
Mountain Park.

Dammit dammit dammit.

I wanted to be on my new, lighter, smoother, truer, aero
wheels.

Dammit.

--Blair
"Shut up, Lance. Today, it *is* about
the damned bike."
Ads
  #2  
Old August 11th 05, 10:03 AM
Chalo
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Default The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.

Blair P. Houghton wrote:

Turns out I'd mis-measured my rear stays and they're only
124 mm. The frame is made of steel. It's reinforced by the
brake mount, so it doesn't flex much the way I need it to.
No way am I bending this frame, and I really don't want to
have anyone else do it either.


I'd reconsider if I were you. I guarantee you that whoever built your
frame bent it at least that much just to put it in its original state.

If it hasn't been deeply corroded internally, it will move again
without damage. If it has been so corroded, better to find out now
than somewhere out on the road.

I have no less than four bikes at home-- all but one of my factory-made
steel frames-- that have been bent to a wider spacing. I've had no
problems as a result of this.

Chalo Colina

  #3  
Old August 11th 05, 12:45 PM
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Default The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.

Chalo is right. Ive got three bikes with 124-126 mm spacing running 9
speeds. No problems. Go ahead and spread the frame slightly and run 9
speed.

  #4  
Old August 11th 05, 12:50 PM
Anthony A.
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Default The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.

I agree with Chalo - I just cold-set a 126mm frame (which is what I
suspect yours is, if it was 6 speed)to 130 without issue, also with a
braced seatstay. It was a little bit of grunting, and that's it.

Works beautifully.

Unless this is a big bucks frame, i vote that you do it yourself. if
it's big bucks, I vote that you bring it to a shop & have them do it
for you.
Good luck.
-A.

  #5  
Old August 11th 05, 03:14 PM
Rick
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Default The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.


Blair P. Houghton wrote:
I got my new wheels. Neuvation M28 Aeros. Cheap, but well
reviewed.

I got a new cassette because moving from 6 to 9 speeds was
part of the justification for the new wheels (the old cogs
are on a freewheel and it's a bit eccentric).

I got a new chain because of the new 9-speed, and a spare
one.

I got new tires and tubes because these are 700C wheels and
my old ones are 27-inch.

I got a cassette tool and a chain whip (in case I had to
remove the cassette once I had it installed).

I got rim tape.

I put the cassette on the wheels, put a tube and tire on
the rear wheel, pumped it up, listened to it blow off,
removed it, put a new tube in, pumped it up, and then put a
tube and tire on the front without incident. The one that
blew must have been defective, because I double-checked
the bead after I set it, and the others aren't showing
any signs of weakness.

I racked my bike, removed its wheels, broke the chain, put
the new front wheel on, and went to put the rear on.

Um.

The new rear hub is 130 mm wide.

Turns out I'd mis-measured my rear stays and they're only
124 mm. The frame is made of steel. It's reinforced by the
brake mount, so it doesn't flex much the way I need it to.
No way am I bending this frame, and I really don't want to
have anyone else do it either.

So I'm kinda screwed at this point.

I can't put this wheel on this frame. The front fits fine.

I can't use a 130-mm rear. And if I switch the hub out,
I'll probably not be able to use a 9-speed cassette.

Dammit.

How did I measure that wrong? I used a caliper and it's way
the hell off. Maybe I measured the front and assumed...

Dammit.

DAMMIT DAMMIT DAMMIT.

And now I can't ride tomorrow because I broke the chain and
I don't have a replacement pin for it...

Maybe the new chain will work. It has a split link, so I
can afford to try it. It might slip between the cogs,
though. And I'll need to lube it, if not strip and lube
it...

Or I can pull my MTB off its hook and go ride in South
Mountain Park.

Dammit dammit dammit.

I wanted to be on my new, lighter, smoother, truer, aero
wheels.

Dammit.


Spreading a steel frame a few mm should be fine.

The bigger problem you need to worry about are your brakes. You are
moving from a 27" (630mm rim) to a 700c (622mm rim). Your braking
surfaces will be 4mm further out. Can you brakes reach that additional
4mm? That is usually the biggest issue converting old frames like
that.

- rick

  #6  
Old August 11th 05, 03:34 PM
Jeff Starr
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Default The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.

On Thu, 11 Aug 2005 07:08:24 GMT, Blair P. Houghton wrote:



Turns out I'd mis-measured my rear stays and they're only
124 mm. The frame is made of steel. It's reinforced by the
brake mount, so it doesn't flex much the way I need it to.
No way am I bending this frame, and I really don't want to
have anyone else do it either.


--Blair


Why not? What brand of frame is it?

Really 4-6mm is not a lot of bending.

No surprise here, Sheldon has the info needed, take a look:
http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html

My vote is for respacing.


Life is Good!
Jeff
  #7  
Old August 11th 05, 04:10 PM
41
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Default The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.


Blair P. Houghton wrote:

Maybe the new chain will work. It has a split link, so I
can afford to try it. It might slip between the cogs,
though. And I'll need to lube it, if not strip and lube


If the chain is new it has already been lubricated at the factory,
likely better than you would do it. Just mount it as is, at most wipe
off some of the excess with a rag, and go.g

  #8  
Old August 12th 05, 03:19 AM
rcoder
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Default The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.

I've been told by several wrenches that the factory lube on chains,
while smooth, is also extremely short-lived. Personally, I've had brand
new bikes show rust on the chain within a week of bringing them home,
after one or two short rides in the rain.

In the late summer, though, you could probably get away with it.

-Lennon

  #9  
Old August 12th 05, 05:46 AM
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Default The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.


Blair P. Houghton wrote:


Turns out I'd mis-measured my rear stays and they're only
124 mm. The frame is made of steel. It's reinforced by the
brake mount, so it doesn't flex much the way I need it to.
No way am I bending this frame, and I really don't want to
have anyone else do it either.


I'll pile on here, and say you should definitely bend the frame. Space
those dropouts to where you need them.

I did this about two months ago to a friend's old bike, and I've done
one of mine. In my case, there must be 15,000 miles on it since I
spread it.

Only caveat I'd mention: Be sure to align the newly-spread dropouts so
they're exactly parallel and nicely lined up. An easy way to check is
to use two long screws as ersatz half-axles. Add washers (if
necessary) and nuts. Screw them to the dropouts so the heads are
outside, the nuts are against the insides of the dropouts, & the screws
point toward each other. Tweak the dropouts as necessary.

It's easy.

- Frank Krygowski

  #10  
Old August 12th 05, 06:40 AM
A Muzi
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Default The one thing that couldn't go wrong, did go wrong.

Blair P. Houghton wrote:

I got my new wheels.

-snip-
The new rear hub is 130 mm wide.
Turns out I'd mis-measured my rear stays and they're only
124 mm. The frame is made of steel. It's reinforced by the
brake mount, so it doesn't flex much the way I need it to.
No way am I bending this frame, and I really don't want to
have anyone else do it either.
So I'm kinda screwed at this point.
I can't put this wheel on this frame. The front fits fine.

-snip-
Lay your frame without wheel flat on the ground. Put your
foot on the frame end. Lift the other one with both hands
until it stays at 130mm. Go ride. Sometime when it's
convenient, have the alignment checked.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 




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