A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Parts and Tariffs



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 31st 19, 06:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,174
Default Parts and Tariffs

https://www.bicycleretailer.com/indu...5#.XWqoWihKgRk

I get all sorts of e-mail advertisements and daily specials, particularly from the local stores. I'm seeing price jumps in Shimano drive-train consumables as well as other parts and was wondering if this is tariff related or just inflation. Andrew?
Ads
  #2  
Old August 31st 19, 08:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,698
Default Parts and Tariffs

On 8/31/2019 12:07 PM, jbeattie wrote:
https://www.bicycleretailer.com/indu...5#.XWqoWihKgRk

I get all sorts of e-mail advertisements and daily specials, particularly from the local stores. I'm seeing price jumps in Shimano drive-train consumables as well as other parts and was wondering if this is tariff related or just inflation. Andrew?


Who knows?

At Bianchi for example several popular models moved from
Taiwan ROC to some subdivision of the People's Army a couple
of years ago (motto: girls who can read assemble i-phones.
The rest build bicycles). They've had increases every month
or two which may reflect duties or duties with a markup. The
retail prices are definitely in different brackets now and
rising again for September.

Campagnolo equipment, even the latest Chorus 12, has been
steady to slightly declining in price despite new features.

I see in today's paper that pork in Beijing moved from 18
yuan/kilo to 32 this year and rising on trade limits and
swine flu (weigh that out - both are factors). That's really
nice for Iowa.

Liz Peek notes that although tariffs in theory harm US
consumers, inflation has been insignificant. Then too, US$
is strong despite brutal debt and deficit numbers.

People who say they understand all this are either going to
be very wealthy or they're lying. I'm not among them.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #3  
Old August 31st 19, 09:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,523
Default Parts and Tariffs

On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 2:57:34 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:

I see in today's paper that pork in Beijing moved from 18
yuan/kilo to 32 this year and rising on trade limits and
swine flu (weigh that out - both are factors). That's really
nice for Iowa.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Not really. Pork is down 50% since April. And current price is about equal to what it was one year ago. So despite swine flu and other problems, pork has stayed the same for one year. China is just doing without meat and/or buying it from other parts of the world. I suspect the pork market, as well as the soybean business that has moved to Brail and Argentina, will never return to the USA. Its gone forever.
  #4  
Old August 31st 19, 09:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,174
Default Parts and Tariffs

On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 1:33:46 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 2:57:34 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:

I see in today's paper that pork in Beijing moved from 18
yuan/kilo to 32 this year and rising on trade limits and
swine flu (weigh that out - both are factors). That's really
nice for Iowa.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Not really. Pork is down 50% since April. And current price is about equal to what it was one year ago. So despite swine flu and other problems, pork has stayed the same for one year. China is just doing without meat and/or buying it from other parts of the world. I suspect the pork market, as well as the soybean business that has moved to Brail and Argentina, will never return to the USA. Its gone forever.


Let's not forget that China bought an American supply chain. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-u...-idUSKCN1NL2BZ Welfare for Chinese companies. You can't make this stuff up.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #5  
Old August 31st 19, 11:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 498
Default Parts and Tariffs

On Sat, 31 Aug 2019 13:33:44 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 2:57:34 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:

I see in today's paper that pork in Beijing moved from 18
yuan/kilo to 32 this year and rising on trade limits and
swine flu (weigh that out - both are factors). That's really
nice for Iowa.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Not really. Pork is down 50% since April. And current price is about equal to what it was one year ago. So despite swine flu and other problems, pork has stayed the same for one year. China is just doing without meat and/or buying it from other parts of the world. I suspect the pork market, as well as the soybean business that has moved to Brail and Argentina, will never return to the USA. Its gone forever.


According to what I read, yes the price of pork in China is up and
imports are up, but it is a result of swine fever not import/export
duties.

Wholesale pork spot prices were at 21.55 yuan a kilogram on June 14,
up 12% from the same period last year.

Import growth for the whole year will likely be capped as China is
shunning U.S. supplies due to the trade spat between the two
countries, said Jim Huang, chief executive officer of
China-data.com.cn, a consultant for the agriculture industry.
--

Cheers,

John B.
  #6  
Old September 1st 19, 03:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,523
Default Parts and Tariffs

On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 5:48:36 PM UTC-5, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sat, 31 Aug 2019 13:33:44 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 2:57:34 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:

I see in today's paper that pork in Beijing moved from 18
yuan/kilo to 32 this year and rising on trade limits and
swine flu (weigh that out - both are factors). That's really
nice for Iowa.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Not really. Pork is down 50% since April. And current price is about equal to what it was one year ago. So despite swine flu and other problems, pork has stayed the same for one year. China is just doing without meat and/or buying it from other parts of the world. I suspect the pork market, as well as the soybean business that has moved to Brail and Argentina, will never return to the USA. Its gone forever.


According to what I read, yes the price of pork in China is up and
imports are up, but it is a result of swine fever not import/export
duties.

Wholesale pork spot prices were at 21.55 yuan a kilogram on June 14,
up 12% from the same period last year.


No. On August 30, 2019, pork closed at $63.73 per hundred weight. On August 27, 2018, one year ago, pork was $64.70. Prices from the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. These are the USA prices that USA farmers sell at. Your prices are Chinese Yuan prices paid in China. The foreign exchange rate does not affect the USA price. It only affects the Chinese buyers. Not the USA sellers. The USA seller gets the exact same price no matter what the foreign exchange rate is.




Import growth for the whole year will likely be capped as China is
shunning U.S. supplies due to the trade spat between the two
countries, said Jim Huang, chief executive officer of
China-data.com.cn, a consultant for the agriculture industry.
--

Cheers,

John B.


  #7  
Old September 1st 19, 04:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 498
Default Parts and Tariffs

On Sat, 31 Aug 2019 19:59:05 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 5:48:36 PM UTC-5, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sat, 31 Aug 2019 13:33:44 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 2:57:34 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:

I see in today's paper that pork in Beijing moved from 18
yuan/kilo to 32 this year and rising on trade limits and
swine flu (weigh that out - both are factors). That's really
nice for Iowa.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

Not really. Pork is down 50% since April. And current price is about equal to what it was one year ago. So despite swine flu and other problems, pork has stayed the same for one year. China is just doing without meat and/or buying it from other parts of the world. I suspect the pork market, as well as the soybean business that has moved to Brail and Argentina, will never return to the USA. Its gone forever.


According to what I read, yes the price of pork in China is up and
imports are up, but it is a result of swine fever not import/export
duties.

Wholesale pork spot prices were at 21.55 yuan a kilogram on June 14,
up 12% from the same period last year.


No. On August 30, 2019, pork closed at $63.73 per hundred weight. On August 27, 2018, one year ago, pork was $64.70. Prices from the Chicago Mercantile ExchangeYour prices are Chinese Yuan prices paid in China. These are the USA prices that USA farmers sell at. Your prices are Chinese Yuan prices paid in China. The foreign exchange rate does not affect the USA price. It only affects the Chinese buyers. Not the USA sellers. The USA seller gets the exact same price no matter what the foreign exchange rate is.

"Your prices are Chinese Yuan prices paid in China"
--------------------------------------------------------------

Well, of course, After all the Chinese are the ultimate consumer (in
this discussion) so, again in this discussion of pork in China, they
are the ones who actually determine the sales volume, and to a great
extent the price.

--

Cheers,

John B.
  #9  
Old September 1st 19, 11:24 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 498
Default Parts and Tariffs

On Sun, 1 Sep 2019 08:39:07 -0000 (UTC), news18
wrote:

On Sat, 31 Aug 2019 13:33:44 -0700, wrote:

On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 2:57:34 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:

I see in today's paper that pork in Beijing moved from 18 yuan/kilo to
32 this year and rising on trade limits and swine flu (weigh that out -
both are factors). That's really nice for Iowa.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Not really. Pork is down 50% since April.

Does the USA now have an over supply to domestic markets from that whch
previously went to china?


I'm not sure if they had an oversupply as the Chinese had been
refusing to buy pork tainted with ractopamine, a feed additive that
helps pigs bulk up with more lean meat in the final weeks before
they're sent for slaughter. It's fed to between 60% and 80% of
American pigs but is banned by China, Russia, and the European Union,
citing concerns over its effect on human health.

(as of 27 Nov 2018) Australia's beef exports to China grew by a
whopping 55 per cent to 151,402 tonnes during the 12 months ending
September.

But: Farmers in China produce in the range of about 450 million hogs
each year to feed a growing nation that is, far and away, the top
consumer of pork products in the world. (North Carolina's entire hog
and pig population is about 9 million.)

Last year, (2017) about 96 percent of the pork consumed in China was
produced by Chinese hog farmers.


And current price is about
equal to what it was one year ago. So despite swine flu and other
problems, pork has stayed the same for one year. China is just doing
without meat and/or buying it from other parts of the world.


They are substituting beef for pork in some parts. Widescale drought in
Australia is seeing massiver amounts of cattle go to slaughter but the
local price has doubled. AFAIK, china has relaxed the beef import quotas
for Aussie Beef and there is significant amount,for Australian market,
being now sent to China.


My wife is Chinese and I'd point out that I can't think of any dish
that she cooks that contains beef. This is not to say that no Chinese
ever eats beef but I would guess that the general public eats beef
very rarely.



I suspect
the pork market, as well as the soybean business that has moved to Brail
and Argentina, will never return to the USA. Its gone forever.

--

Cheers,

John B.
  #10  
Old September 2nd 19, 01:48 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 764
Default Parts and Tariffs

On Sunday, September 1, 2019 at 1:39:12 AM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On Sat, 31 Aug 2019 13:33:44 -0700, wrote:

On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 2:57:34 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:

I see in today's paper that pork in Beijing moved from 18 yuan/kilo to
32 this year and rising on trade limits and swine flu (weigh that out -
both are factors). That's really nice for Iowa.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Not really. Pork is down 50% since April.

Does the USA now have an over supply to domestic markets from that whch
previously went to china?

And current price is about
equal to what it was one year ago. So despite swine flu and other
problems, pork has stayed the same for one year. China is just doing
without meat and/or buying it from other parts of the world.


They are substituting beef for pork in some parts. Widescale drought in
Australia is seeing massiver amounts of cattle go to slaughter but the
local price has doubled. AFAIK, china has relaxed the beef import quotas
for Aussie Beef and there is significant amount,for Australian market,
being now sent to China.


I suspect
the pork market, as well as the soybean business that has moved to Brail
and Argentina, will never return to the USA. Its gone forever.


Why would you think the Chinese are stupid? They have already opened subsidies in the US and stocked them with all of the common goods that they were selling here. They beat the tariffs on bicycle goods for the most part.

I have never understood the disrespect that children are ready, willing and able to attend to others.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Campy hubs and parts between 2003 Proton and 2002 Eurus parts Chris M Techniques 3 September 25th 08 01:33 PM
Australians making sausage out of handlebar and spoke tariffs [email protected] Techniques 7 November 7th 07 11:12 AM
Vietnamese and Chinese bike frames - increased EU tariffs JLB UK 8 June 11th 05 02:15 PM
Used Parts [email protected] Marketplace 1 January 17th 05 05:36 AM
FS: XTR Parts, Mountain Parts Daniel Boscacci Marketplace 1 November 12th 03 09:07 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.